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Doctor insights on: Narrow Stance Leg Presses

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While lying down with pointed toes & straight legs stretch legs as hard as possible. Can this overstretch leg ligaments?

While lying down with pointed toes & straight legs stretch legs as hard as possible. Can this overstretch leg ligaments?

Generally no. : Over stretching of ligaments usually occur from an injury (athletic or traumatic). This is considered an "active" stretch of the ligament involved. What you are describing is a "passive" stretch which generally do not cause an injury. ...Read more

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Toes bend backwards and the arch of the foot twists, ankle becomes rigid and swells at line of ligament, can't walk. Restless leg syndrome?

Toes bend backwards and the arch of the foot twists, ankle becomes rigid and swells at line of ligament, can't walk.  Restless leg syndrome?

Doubt it: This sounds more like carpo-pedal spasm, or more simply "charley horses." the muscles of the ankle and wrist are prone to these problems, which can come on spontaneously for no reason, or can be associated with excessive muscle activity in exercise without adequate stretching, as well as too low a level of either potassium, calcium or magnesium in the blood. If it is recurrent, see your doctor. ...Read more

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Flexible high arch runner. Stability shoes caused arch to collapse, feet to evert, numbness 1st web space, and anterior hip rotation. Reversable?

Flexible high arch runner. Stability shoes caused arch to collapse, feet to evert, numbness 1st web space, and anterior hip rotation. Reversable?

Arches don't : Generally collapse save for a charcot foot deformity or posterior tibial tendon rupture. I would recommed an in office consult with a foot doctor for an exam. ...Read more

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Pain in lower abdominal muscle on left side only when doing decline bench curls or straight left leg lift laying down? What to do? Maybe hip flexor?

Pain in lower abdominal muscle on left side only when doing decline bench curls or straight left leg lift laying down?  What to do?  Maybe hip flexor?

Need exam: Your location of your pain could indeed be due to a hip flexor/adductor muscle strain but it could be several other things as well, including hernias and other intraabdominal or pelvic causes. See your family physician for exam and possible referral to specialist. Good luck! ...Read more

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Leg stiffness and possible leg cramps when lying lying down?

Leg stiffness and possible leg cramps when lying lying down?

Nocturnal leg cramps: This may be nocturnal leg cramps. The best treatment for this is quinine, but now the fda does not allow quinine to be used for this. It is very effective for this, does have side effects, but has never had formal testing. There are a lot of medicines we have learned to use which it never had formal fda testing. Unfortunately this is one we can't use anymore. Available treatment is now stretchingmaintain electrolyte balance. ...Read more

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Left leg flex-or tendon unresponsive, when seated or standing or walking unable to point toes/foot upwards using muscles/tendons partial loss of sensation in left leg from knee down, causing embarrassing limp, 25 year old male

Left leg flex-or tendon unresponsive, when seated or standing or walking unable to point toes/foot upwards using muscles/tendons partial loss of sensation in left leg from knee down, causing embarrassing limp, 25 year old male

This : This sounds like a serious issue that should be evaluated in-person by a qualified physician! if your weakness was sudden, there are numerous possible causes, most importantly associated with your nervous system. It does not sound like you had a trauma, so muscle-or-tendon ruptures are unlikely. The most common reason for this problem is an acute disc herniation in the lumbar spine, that can occur without back pain or even any kind of bending/lifting injury. This causes nerve compression that gives patients typically radiating leg pain, numbness and weakness. The muscles that are associated with each lumbar spine level need to be tested individually during a good physical examination, and the distribution of your numbness should be traced. That can often lead to a pretty good diagnosis, even before imaging studies are done. You will probably need a set of standing lumbar x-rays and then possibly an MRI of your back to determine the real cause of the problem. There could be an inflammatory problem with onevof your nerves in the buttock or leg, although that is not as common as nerve root compression in the lower spine. Very rarely can individual nerve roots be affected with a disease inside of the cauda equina, the lower part of your nervous system inside of the lumbar spine, so that is unlikely. Even more rare would be a spinal cord problem higher up in the spine, or some kind of stroke inside of your brain, so that would not be the first thing your doctor will be looking for. Make sure you tell your physician as clear as you can when the problem started, where you feel weak, and where the numbness is (front, side, back of the lower leg?). Associated fever, chills, recent weight loss and problems with urination are important to convey to your doctor also. Do not wait too long to go see someone. Hopefully you can be treated with a course of anti-inflammatory medicines (similar to ibuprofen) and maybe physical therapy to see if things improve. Even with weakness, there is no good evidence for early surgery, as most patients -even if they were weak for a long time from nerve-root compression- eventually regain their strength just fine. Depending on the evaluation and possible MRI scan, do not let yourself get scared into surgery right away; try non-operative treatments first. If things do not improve, and there is indeed a significant amount of nerve compression in the lumbar spine, surgery might be the answer, and it is often very successful for this. Good luck! ...Read more

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Knees hurt when climbing , bending, sitting with knees bent. Also hamstrings?

Knees hurt when climbing , bending, sitting with knees bent. Also hamstrings?

Patella femoral : If your pain is in front/under your knee cap, then most likely patella femoral pain syndrome/chondromalacia patella. Best managed with exercise to strengthen your quads to improve tracking, and avoiding deep knee bending activities. Also oral or topical nsaids can be of benefit, as well as a brace. Injection of cortisone or hyaluronic acid also very popular. If all else fails, then scope. ...Read more

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My left foot towards sideways/outwards, even in different shoes. I'm 67, 6' tall woman, narrow feet with high arch, hammer/crossed toes & neuropathy.

My left foot towards sideways/outwards, even in different shoes.  I'm 67, 6' tall woman, narrow feet with high arch, hammer/crossed toes & neuropathy.

Hip muscle weakness: The neuropathy has not caused the lateral deviation In the foot placement. This is typically a hip,muscle weakness. You should be in a better shoe,to,accommodate the hammer toes, or see a podiatrist to determine if foot reconstruction is needed for these multiple maladies ...Read more

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Oa of right knee. Aches while walking and turning right leg in sleep. Carrying out preliminary leg exercises.

Oa of right knee. Aches while walking and turning right leg in sleep. Carrying out preliminary leg exercises.

Exercise: The exercise is good but you may want to try non weight bearing exercises like swimming or pool areobics. A knee wrap or analgesic balm can be helpful at night. Otc meds like aleve (naproxen) are also helpful but take with food. And finally, I use a herbal product available online by the name of ' pains all gone' i keep a bottle at my bedside and a bottle in the office to use when regular meds fail. ...Read more

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44 y/o female, leg tremors upon standing/walking down stairs, marked decrease in strength of arms and legs from a squatting position. Thoughts?

44 y/o female, leg tremors upon standing/walking down stairs, marked decrease in strength of arms and legs from a squatting position. Thoughts?

Need exam: You need a physical exam and further evaluation to investigate these issues. It is impossible to give you an opinion on possible factors or causes in this format. ...Read more

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Swelling back leg isolated below gastrocnemius to ankle. MRI, arteriovenous US normal.Tightness both sides of leg near ankle w/ dorsiflex. Tendonitis?

Swelling back leg isolated below gastrocnemius to ankle. MRI, arteriovenous US normal.Tightness both sides of leg near ankle w/ dorsiflex. Tendonitis?

MRI of what?: This is tendonitis the MRI should have picked it up. If it was a Baker's cyst the US should have picked it up. What else did these examinations show? You need to discuss with your physician the results of the tests and what was and what was not imaged. ...Read more

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Can sleep positions affect height? Does sleeping w/ 1 leg bent in fetal position or legs straight (feel bit pulling behind knees) add height in adults

Can sleep positions affect height? Does sleeping w/ 1 leg bent in fetal position or legs straight (feel bit pulling behind knees) add height in adults

Not really: Any comfortable sleeping position may be used, and none of the positions add height more than any other position. All the comfortable positions will add the same slight amount of height, because weight is taken off the spine during sleep (the vertical downward force of gravity is not acting vertically upon a person's spine, during typical sleep in a bed). The effect goes away, when one stands up. ...Read more

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