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Doctor insights on: Myofascial Pain Syndrome Emedicine

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Thoracic outlet syndrome causes arm/neck pain how?

Thoracic outlet syndrome causes arm/neck pain how?

Crowding: Pressure on brachial plexus the nerves from the spinal cord to arm become a group of nerves called the brachial plexus it is compressed by a crowding from an extra rib on top of the rib cage 1st rib or extra cervical rib the working theory goes adfitionally vascular compression of brachial artery or vein can produce arm symptoms nerve pain can extend proximal to neck or distal to arm and hand. ...Read more

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Dr. Laurence Badgley
1,370 doctors shared insights

Fibromyalgia (Definition)

A condition that affects the muscles and soft tissue of the body, causing widespread ...Read more


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What is chronic regional pain syndrome?

What is chronic regional pain syndrome?

NIH Definition: Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic (lasting greater than six months) pain condition that most often affects one limb (arm, leg, hand, or foot) usually after an injury. CRPS is believed to be caused by damage to, or malfunction of, the peripheral and central nervous systems. CRPS 1 is without a confirmed nerve injury and CRPS 2 is when there is a confirmed associated nerve injury. ...Read more

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Regional pain syndrome--cures?

Regional pain syndrome--cures?

Regional pain syndro: Expecting a cure is unrealistic. Reduction of pain and symptoms can be possible. ...Read more

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Is myofascial pain syndrome a serious condition that needs medical attention?

Is myofascial pain syndrome a serious condition that needs medical attention?

Needs attention: It can be quite uncomfortable. You can develop horrible migraine headaches and suffer needlessly. Eventually, you can develop problems in the joints themselves. Absolutely address this as a arlymas possible. ...Read more

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How can snapping scapula syndrome and thoracic outlet syndrome be related?

How can snapping scapula syndrome and thoracic outlet syndrome be related?

Muscle imbalances: Imo tos results from superior trapezius (st) weak & collar bone droops toward first rib closing costoclavicular space (between these bones) clipping artery & nerves to arm. Weak st conscripts neighbor levator scapulae (ls) to burden lifting scapula (sc) & 20 lb. Arm. Long & narrow, ls incurs chronic spasm, tendonitis at insertion on superior sc spine (pick-like), & snapping as shoulder rotates. ...Read more

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Whats idiopathic musculoskeletal pain syndrome?

See below: Idiopathic is simply a fancy term to say that we do not know what the cause is. In this case, this would be a very general term that states that the person has musculoskeletal pain and we do not know the cause. The condition that comes closest to this is fibromyalgia which is widespread muscular pain whose cause is unknown. ...Read more

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What is chronic complex regional pain syndrome?

What is chronic complex regional pain syndrome?

Painful: Crps is a condition of hypersensitivity in your nervous system. Although the exact mechanism is not known it involves your sensory nerves and your nerves that control blood vessels, and may also involve your immune system. Characteristically the pain is burning or shocking in nature, an extremity is affected after a minor to moderate trauma and there may be color and temperature changes. ...Read more

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Can thoracic outlet syndrome cause severe chronic pain at the t6 region.?

Unlikely: Thoracic outlet affects lateral neck, shoulder blade, lateral upper chest, and radiates down the arm typically to digits 4 and 5 of the hand, if the neurogenic variety. A more distal variation seems focalized to the lateral chest and armpit, (pectoralis minor). T-6 is too low for tos. Severe pain there is more likely of discogenic origin, if within the spine, or referred pain from internal organs. ...Read more

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What's the treatment for myofacial pain syndrome?

What's the treatment for myofacial pain syndrome?

One option: It is important to have this medically evaluated to determine the cause so that a treatment plan can be developed. Acupuncture is one option that can be effective. After a complete evaluation, your doctor can let you know if this option is appropriate for you. ...Read more

Dr. Brian Le Dr. Le
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What characterizes complex regional pain syndrome?

Dr. Brian Le Dr. Le
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What characterizes complex regional pain syndrome?

CRPS: Complex regional pain syndrome is an uncommon form of chronic pain that usually affects an arm or leg. Complex regional pain syndrome typically develops after an injury, surgery ... The pain is out of proportion to the severity of the initial injury, if any. The cause of complex regional pain syndrome isn't clearly understood. ...Read more

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Willsjogrens syndrome cause muscle pain?

Willsjogrens syndrome cause muscle pain?

Dry eyes & mouth : Sjögren’s can also affect other parts of the body. Patients may experience pain, stiffness and swelling in the joints, rashes on the arms and legs related to vasculitis – an inflammation of tiny blood vessels. The lungs, liver and kidneys may become inflamed; some people develop tingling and numbness in the limbs because of neurological involvement. ...Read more

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Chronic regional pain syndrome, any advice on coping?

Chronic regional pain syndrome, any advice on coping?

CrPS: Find out about some local support groups - they are all over. Go to them and you will get the support and coping advice you seek. ...Read more

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Can lyrica (pregabalin) help with my chronic myofascial pain syndrome?

Can lyrica (pregabalin) help with my chronic myofascial pain syndrome?

Possibly: Lyrica (pregabalin) does a good job with diabetic peripheral nerve pain, and may be useful with other pain syndromes. Another drug, cymbalta, has now been approved for a variety of non-nerve pain syndromes, and may be a bit more useful with "myofascial pain". You could try either, but high dosage levels may be important, if you can adjust to side effects. ...Read more

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What is myofascial trigger point release for musculoskeletal pain?

See below: A myofascial trigger point is thought to be an area of irritable muscle. Pressure on this area will often cause local pain as well as a referral of pain to other sites. The exact nature and cause of these trigger points is unknown but they do exist. Trigger point release is a manual therapy technique to desensitize this spot. It usually consists of deep pressure as well as stretch of the muscle. ...Read more

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What is complex regional pain syndrome without pain?

What is complex regional pain syndrome without pain?

CRPS: The main character of complex regional pain syndrome is pain. I'm not aware of any complex regional pain syndrome without pain. ...Read more

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What is complex regional pain syndrome?

What is complex regional pain syndrome?

Painful: Crps is a condition of hypersensitivity in your nervous system. Although the exact mechanism is not known it involves your sensory nerves and your nerves that control blood vessels, and may also involve your immune system. Characteristically the pain is burning or shocking in nature, an extremity is affected after a minor to moderate trauma and there may be color and temperature changes. ...Read more

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Fibromyalgia or myofascial pain--which is worse?

Fibromyalgia or myofascial pain--which is worse?

Perspective: Both are painful & can be tough to treat. I deal a lot with both. Some causes of fibro, such as ligament laxity or food sensitivities, if found, may be treated, but the cause is often elusive. Myofascial pain usually results from trauma; if tissues, bones, or nerves are fractured, cut or crushed, it's harder to treat. Osteopathic manipulation has proven very effective in many of my cases. ...Read more

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Which doctors treat complex regional pain syndrome (RSD)?

Which doctors treat complex regional pain syndrome (RSD)?

See details: Rheumatologists, neurologists or pain specialists are all good choices ...Read more