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Doctor insights on: My Father Diagonised With Hemochromotosis Does That Mean I Get It

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Should I be concerned if my father has niemann pick's disease type c and also hemochromatosis.?

Should I be concerned if my father has niemann pick's disease type c and also hemochromatosis.?

Yes: Your dad has a storage disease that may cause trouble, and if his hemochromatosis is primary, he'll need to get rid of the iron by phlebotomy -- easy enough. If you mean "concerned about your own health", if your parents aren't close blood relatives you're unlikely to get niemann pick's, but the hemochromatosis gene is quite common and it's worth screening you just like everybody else. ...Read more

Dr. (Liz)Phuong Tran
321 Doctors shared insights

Hemochromatosis (Definition)

A medical condition caused by iron accumulation in the body. It can be the result of underlying hereditary disease or be due ...Read more


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My father has niemann pick's disease type c and also hemochromatosis. What can you tell me about these conditions?

My father has niemann pick's disease type c and also hemochromatosis. What can you tell me about these conditions?

Hard and easy: Coincidence. Niemann-Pick is a genetic disease of variable severity. Hemochromatosis is a very common disease in which storage iron is increased; it is extremely easy to manage by phlebotomy. There's a new orphan drug that may be available to manage Nieman-Pick. Best wishes. ...Read more

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There's an hemochromatosis health issue in my family. My grandfather had it, but not my father. What are the chances that I have the disease?

There's an hemochromatosis health issue in my family. My grandfather had it, but not my father. What are the chances that I have the disease?

Low, probably: If your granddad had hereditary hemochromatosis caused by homozygous mutations of the hfe gene, then your father has at least one mutation. Your mom may be a carrier - this is pretty common: about 1/9 people with a northern european background have 1 mutation. So your risk of inheriting 2 mutations may be about 3%. However, 75-90% of individuals with 2 mutations never get sick. ...Read more

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My father has a diagnosis of hemochromatosis. My blood lab results seem ambivalent to me. Insight would be appreciated. I have blood tests with me?

My father has a diagnosis of hemochromatosis. My blood lab results seem ambivalent to me. Insight would be appreciated. I have blood tests with me?

Hemochromatosis: The most important thing to know is that all of your first degree relatives need to be examined and have lab tests and genetic testing for hemochromatosis. In some cases imaging may need to be performed. See this link for more info:http://www. Mayoclinic. Org/diseases-conditions/hemochromatosis/diagnosis-treatment/diagnosis/dxc-20167322 ...Read more

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Hemochromatosis: is it possible to inherit both mutated genes from one parent, or is it always one from each parent?

One per parent: It's exceptional to inherit two alleles at one locus from a single parent, though there's some exceptional cases. Here's a heads-up, though -- hemochromatosis can occur in someone with just one dose if he/she takes in a lot of iron for some reason. Of all the highly lethal common diseases, hemochromatosis is the easiest by far to manage. ...Read more

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Hemochromatosis. How do you get hemochromatosis?

Inherited: Inherited disorder of any one of a number of genes that are involved in iron transport and storage. The vast majority of hemochromatosis is type! A point mutation in the hfe gene, (c282y) on the short arm of chromosome 6. ...Read more

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What does genetic inheritance of hemochromatosis mean?

What does genetic inheritance of hemochromatosis mean?

Inherited: Most primary hemochromatosis is passed parent-to-child, especially if each parent supplies one defective gene, though people with a single dose may be affected. If you're not familiar with basic genetics, you need to become familiar with the terminology as it's basic to life and understanding health and disease in the 21st century. ...Read more

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I have hemochromatosis and had my first phlebotomy yesterday. I was to get 300cc out. My blood was so thick it took 1.5hrs to get 200. Why is my blood like that and the risks?

Iron overload: This disease, if advanced, causes increased red blood cells, increased iron, and "thick blood". You may not be well hydrated. Are you on an aspirin? You need to see a hematologist or a GI doctor who deals with this illness & have a good treatment area with experienced phlebotomists. Drink lots of water the day of and be patient. You may have to go every 1-2 weeks for a while & follow closely. ...Read more

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Can you still get symptoms of hemochromatosis while breastfeeding at age 44?

Not really: In hemochromatosis, not only excess deposition of iron occurs in liver, pancreas, heart, joints but can also deposit in pitutary gland (gland in the brain), which can cause hormonal imbalance. However, females are usually less affected than male. ...Read more

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What to do if I have hemochromatosis have to give blood. Can you get medical retirement on this or not. Just asking than?

What to do if I have hemochromatosis have to give blood. Can you get medical retirement on this or not. Just asking than?

Not a disability: Of all the common diseases that will kill a person horribly if they are missed or neglected, hemochromatosis is the easiest to manage. Dropping off a unit or two of blood each week -- whether it's available for transfusion or not -- until you're at a good iron level, then being followed and having blood drawn as required, will keep you healthy. I hope this isn't a disappointment. Best wishes. ...Read more

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Can I get cure with hemochromatosis?

No: But mainstay of treatment is therapeutic phlebotomy. ...Read more

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Do a lot of people get hemochromatosis?

It's relatively rare: Hemochromatosis is a disorder where a person has too much iron in the blood. This can cause significant problems as iron will deposit in areas like the hear and liver. While it is typically rare, it can be seen if someone takes too much iron supplement. Generally, men should not take iron if they are otherwise healthy. Women, on the other hand, are usually ok provided they are still mentruati. ...Read more

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Is it possible for a person to get iron overload from eating a lot of meat but doesn't have gene for hemochromatosis?

Is it possible for a person to get iron overload from eating a lot of meat but doesn't have gene for hemochromatosis?

You're fine: Argentinas gauchos live in a 100% meat diet without apparent ill effects. In the absence of the gene for hemochromatosis, your gut simply doesn't absorb the extra iron. Don't worry about nonexistent / negligible risks -- life's difficult enough. ...Read more

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Could I go into the army with hemochromatosis?

Could I go into the army with hemochromatosis?

No: AR 40-501 Ch 2-e (5) "current or history of metabolic liver disease, including but not limited to hemochromatosis..." No chance of a waiver for that one. ...Read more

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What are some of the symptoms of hemochromatosis?

A few: Lack of energy, abdominal pain, memory fog, loss of sex drive, heart flutters, irregular heart beat. When symptoms are associated with hemochromatosis, these usually begin in men in their late 20’s to early 30’s. In women, symptoms usually start about 10-15 years after they stop having a period due to menopause, birth control pills or hysterectomy. ...Read more

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Could you explain what is hemochromatosis illness?

Iron overload: This is a genetic tendency to absorb iron too readily through the gut, overloading and damaging the organs. Of all the common, deadly diseases that disable and kill young adults, this is by far the easiest to manage by removing blood and thus iron. Consider yourself fortunate. Secondary hemochromatosis is due to repeated transfusions and is more difficult to care for. Glad you're diagnosed. ...Read more

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I want to know what's the impact of hemochromatosis?

Get treated or die: It's as simple as that. Common hereditary hemochromatosis is by far the easiest to manage of all the common, deadly diseases of young people. It announces itself as elevated liver enzymes, impotence, an odd skin color, sore joints at the base of the thumbs, glucose intolerance, or whatever. Accept therapeutic phlebotomy and you'll feel much better. If it's missed or neglected, it's deadly. Period. ...Read more

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What is the definition or description of: Hemochromatosis?

Hemochromatosis: Genetic metabolic disorder of the utilization of iron and can lead to tissue Fe deposits which can have serious side effects to those organs, especially the liver. ...Read more

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Is hemochromatosis considered dominant or considered recessive?

Is hemochromatosis considered dominant or considered recessive?

Recessive (sort of): The common genetic defect in the hfe gene for phenotypic hemochromatosis is the c282y/c282y homozygous. However other defects other than c282y can lead to hemochromatosis. C282y heterozgyotes with hhc are though to posses another unclassified defect. ...Read more

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Can hemochromatosis kill you?

Yes: Untreated, it's lethal. If it's unrecognized, your elevated liver enzymes may lead to your being accused of being a secret problem drinker. You'll lose your sexuality, develop arthritis, and eventually turn yellow, bloat up, and die over several years. It's not pleasant. If you are diagnosed with hemochromatosis, be aware that it's the easiest of all the killers to keep under control. ...Read more

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Is the blood dark in hemochromatosis?

No: The color is normal. Brown blood usually means methemoglobin. ...Read more

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Help docs! My friend has a hemochromatosis?

Glad it's diagnosed: Of all the common, dread diseases, this one is the easiest to manage. I'm going to assume this is primary hemochromatosis not secondary to transfusion for some other lifetime illness. Your friend will be treated with regular phlebotomy and will start feeling a whole lot better in a short time. ...Read more

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What is iron overload, hemochromatosis?

Too much bodily iron: As a result of the inability to increase iron loss, iron overload is an inevitable response to increased iron entry into the body. This can occur by one of three mechanisms - nutritional intake, increased absorption, parenteral sources (i.e. Transfusions). Hemochromatosis is abnormally high absorption of iron as result of a genetic defect. Extra iron can be toxic. ...Read more

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I have hemochromatosis - can I donate blood?

I have hemochromatosis - can I donate blood?

No: Unfortunately, the red cross does not allow this blood to be donated even though there is nothing wrong with the blood. However, certain bacteria thrive on iron and that may be the red cross's rational. ...Read more

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How exactly do you test for hemochromatosis?

How exactly do you test for hemochromatosis?

Varous blood work: Helpful., such as serum transferrin, transferin saturation, liver enzyme testing, ferritin level. Other options include, liver biopsy and imaging. ...Read more

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How common is iron overload/hemochromatosis?

How common is iron overload/hemochromatosis?

1 in 200: It's extremely common, and of all the common, serious diseases, it is the easiest to manage. If it's discovered relatively late, the person realizes they've had "the blahs" for years once phlebotomy removes the excess iron. ...Read more

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How serious is iron overload, hemochromatosis?

Can be deadly: Over time, excesses of iron build up in major organs such as the heart, liver, pancreas, joints and pituitary. If the extra iron is not removed, these organs can become diseased, causing conditions like diabetes mellitus, irregular heart beat or heart attack, arthritis, cirrhosis of the liver or liver cancer, gall bladder disease, depression, impotence, infertility, hypothyroidism, hypogonadism. ...Read more