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Doctor insights on: My Brother Just Found Out He Has Copd Does He Need To Stop Smoking

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My brother just found out he has COPD does he need to stop smoking ?

My brother just found out he has COPD does he need to stop smoking ?

Yes, and yes yes: Stopping smoking is the surest way to slow the progression of the disease and increase both quality of life and the number of years that your brother may live. There are many methods to quit smoking - the most successful include medications plus a cessation intervention that focuses on behavior and social support. Your local physician should have information on both. ...Read more

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Dr. Heidi Fowler
826 doctors shared insights

Quit Smoking (Definition)

Quitting smoking is the single most important decision smokers can make to improve their health. Preparing a quit-smoking plan and enlisting support from your doctor and your loved ones can greatly improve your chances of success. Your doctor can help you decide if over-the-counter or prescription medications can help. Pick a quit day a few weeks ahead and put it on your calendar. Plan how you're going deal with situations that make you want to smoke. Take advantage of support from family, friends, and co-workers, and consider joining a smoking cessation program so that you don't ...Read more


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If I stop smoking will that help heal my copd?

If I stop smoking will that help heal my copd?

Yes: COPD is caused by the accumulated damage created by exposure of the lungs to the toxins in cigarette smoke. If smoking is stopped, no new damage occurs and some old damage can heal. However, just like with the skin, sometimes scarring is left behind which can leave permanent changes. Damage that is not yet "scarred" can often heal. The sooner the smoking stops, the better. ...Read more

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If you are on oxygen due to COPD and start exercising and stop smoking could you get off oxygen?

If you are on oxygen due to COPD and start exercising and stop smoking could you get off oxygen?

It's possible: It's possible but not certain. If stopping smoking helps your mucus production and bronchospasm that would help and if exercise resulted in significant weight loss that might help but if most of the hypoxia was related to emphysema then those interventions might not make much difference in oxygen levels. Best to quit smoking either way though to avoid cancer and disease progression. ...Read more

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If you are on oxygen because you have COPD can you get off oxygen if you exercise and stop smoking?

If you are on oxygen because you have COPD  can you get off oxygen if you exercise and stop smoking?

Yes wait 3 months: If you quit smoking your lung capacity may improve and retesting oxygen need after 2 to 3 months is recommended. ...Read more

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Could emphysema and COPD continue to progress after you stop smoking for 40 years?

Could emphysema and COPD continue to progress after you stop smoking for 40 years?

Usually not, but...: Once you stop smoking, the destruction from the smoking stops. But, the decline in lung function does not. Everyone loses lung function with aging. But those who have COPD may lose that function at a faster rate, even if they stop smoking. Does that mean they should continue to smoke? No! ...Read more

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I quit smoking 10 years ago, but was just diagnosed with copd. Will my lungs get worse?

Yes...: COPD is a slowly progressive disease that has no cure. So, over time, your condition will slowly get worse. There are treatments that will control symptoms, however, so see your doctor. Smoking cessation is important to slow disease progression so congrats on quitting! follow your doctor's treatment plan to control your symptoms! ...Read more

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My sis has bad COPD and continues to smoke. What could happen to her if she doesn't quit smoking?

My sis has bad COPD and continues to smoke. What could happen to her if she doesn't quit smoking?

COPD: smoke will continue to damage her lung tissue and eventually she will not be able to collect enough oxygen from the air and require extra oxygen. COPD is serious issue and you should continue to encourage her to quit smoking. ...Read more

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Many people i know with copd have more trouble with their breathing, when they quit smoking. Why is that?

Many people i know with copd  have more trouble with their breathing,  when they quit smoking. Why is that?

Lungs start to work: one of the side effects of smoking is poor clearance of mucus from the respiratory system. Many long time smokers who quit (the right thing to do) will get a lot of coughing as their lungs wake up and get rid of all that junk that has been sitting there for ages... It gets better and the lungs can recover from the smoking with time. ...Read more

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I have COPD and early Emphysema, I just quit smoking and was wondering will my breathing get better over time ?

I have COPD and early Emphysema, I just quit smoking and was wondering will my breathing get better over time ?

It won't get worse: Good job! You should be proud as you have accomplished a great step! With the right therapies it will not get worse. When you quit smoking you preserve the lungs that are still viable and working. you need to be on inhalers and measure your oxygen level on exertion. ...Read more

Dr. Sue Ferranti
936 doctors shared insights

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (Copd) (Definition)

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, otherwise known as COPD, may include chronic bronchitis, emphysema, or both. Chronic bronchitis is the production of increased mucus caused by inflammation. Bronchitis is considered chronic if you cough and produce excess mucus for most days three months out of the year, two years in a row. Emphysema is a disease that damages the air sacs or the smallest breathing tubes in the lungs. COPD is commonly associated with smoking. ...Read more


Copd (Definition)

COPD may include chronic bronchitis, emphysema, or both. Chronic bronchitis is the production of increased mucus caused by inflammation. Bronchitis is considered chronic if you cough and produce excess mucus most days for three months in a year, two years in a row. Emphysema is a disease that damages the air sacs and/or the smallest breathing tubes in the lungs. ...Read more