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Doctor insights on: Multifocal Motor Neuropathy Prognosis

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Whats multifocal motor neuropathy?

Whats multifocal motor neuropathy?

Neuropathy: Multifocal motor neuropathy is a progressive muscle disorder characterized by muscle weakness in the hands, with differences from one side of the body to the other in the specific muscles involved. It affects men much more than women. Symptoms also include muscle wasting, cramping, and involuntary contractions or twitching of the leg muscles. ...Read more

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Dr. Olav Jaren
1,351 doctors shared insights

Nerve Damage (Definition)

A complete nerve transection will leave an area totally numb. The distribution of the numbers depends upon where the nerve was cut. A partial nerve injury may leave the area tingly or incompletely numb. Finally even if the nerve is not cut the swelling and bruising to the tea can affect the nerve as well. Usually we consider sharp penetrating injuries as likely having nerve lacerations when sensation is lost. A hand surgeon can examine the hand and pinpoint the site or extent of nerve injury and recommend ...Read more


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What is prognosis for multifocal motor neuropathy?

What is prognosis for multifocal motor neuropathy?

See below: Patients usually start to see improvement within 3 to 6 weeks of starting treatment. Over the long hall it is a somewhat progressive disorder. ...Read more

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Any treatment of multifocal motor neuropathy?

Any treatment of multifocal motor neuropathy?

Neuropathy: Treatment for multifocal motor neuropathy varies. Some individuals experience only mild, modest symptoms and require no treatment. For others, treatment generally consists of intravenous immunoglobulin (ivig) or immunosuppressive therapy with cyclophosphamide. ...Read more

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How long can ivig control multifocal motor neuropathy?

Forever: Intra venous immunoglobulins can help control many auto immune diseases. Sometimes remission can be achieved after only a few doses, but sometimes long-term or recurrent intermittent use is needed. Other times ivig may fail to control the disease. ...Read more

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What exactly is axonal sensorimotor peripheral polyneuropathy?

What exactly is axonal sensorimotor peripheral polyneuropathy?

Answer: Description of a peripheral neuropathy that predominantly affects the axon, wire within nerve, and secondarily affects the myelin, insulation. This characteristically occurs in diabetes, alcohol nutritional problems, porphyria, solvent exposure, amyloidosis, etc. ...Read more

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Contemplating surgery. I have type II diabetes, depression, carpal tunnel syndrome, peripheral neuropathy. Abnormal nerve conduction Multileveled bilateral acute on chronic cervical radiculopathy.Correlate EMG findings with cervical spine MRI. Severe sens

Contemplating surgery. I have type II diabetes, depression, carpal tunnel syndrome, peripheral neuropathy. Abnormal nerve conduction Multileveled bilateral acute on chronic cervical radiculopathy.Correlate EMG findings with cervical spine MRI. Severe sens

Double Crush: Sounds like you may have what's known as "double crush" phenomenon. Both cervical spine and entrapment of the ulnar/median nerve causing symptoms. Certainly, carpal tunnel and/or cubital tunnel release is easier and less risky than neck surgery and usually considered before neck surgery. Unfortunately, diabetes puts you at high risk for recurrence of carpal/cubital tunnel syndrome. ...Read more

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What is the difference between progresive multifocal leukoencephilopathy (pml) and reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome (rpls)?

What is the difference between progresive multifocal leukoencephilopathy (pml) and reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome (rpls)?

Different problems: Pml is a viral disease affecting the brain and occurs in patients with compromised immune systems such as those with aids, transplants, cancer, etc. Rpls is a reversible syndrome of headaches, seizures, confusion, and other symptoms due to medications, high blood pressure, etc. And improves upon treatment of the underlying disorder. ...Read more

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How does motor neuron disease progress?

How does motor neuron disease progress?

Depends: There are many different types of motor neuron diseases, each of which has its own unique progression (which is how we tell which one you might have oftentimes). You'll need to be more specific in order to get a good answer. If you think you have a motor neuron disease, you need to get to the doctor right away. ...Read more

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What is axonal peripheral neuropathy?

What is axonal peripheral neuropathy?

Axonal PN: Axonal peripheral neuropathy is an illness that may cause numbness and weakness affecting the feet, legs and sometimes the hands. In this condition the nerve cells (axons) that transmit information become ill. Common causes of this condition are hormonal and blood chemistry disorders...... http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/peripheralneuropathy/detail_peripheralneuropathy.htm ...Read more

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How does bulbar palsy relate to motor neuron diseases?

How does bulbar palsy relate to motor neuron diseases?

One of the causes: Bulbar palsy is an assortment of signs and symptoms, not the name of a precise disease. Bulbar palsy refers to impairment of function of the cranial nerves ix, x, xi and xii. Its causes are many and motor neuron disease (als) is one of them. ...Read more

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Is chronic diffuse sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy with predominant external & secondary demyelinative changes a long-term disability?

Is chronic diffuse sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy with predominant external & secondary demyelinative changes a long-term disability?

It can be: Sensorimotor peripheral neuropathies have many types and various causes. Some of them can be disabling, even long term in some cases. A thorough search will have to include blood tests and urine tests. In some cases spinal tab (lumbar puncture) can be necessary. In delineating the diagnosis. ...Read more

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What are the last stages of motor neurons disease, bulbar palsy?

What are the last stages of motor neurons disease,  bulbar palsy?

Impaired cranial nn: Cranial nerves 9 - 12. Are usually affected in bulbar palsy (a lower motor neuron disease, as compared to pseudobulbar palsy, which i just discussed). Again, there are multiple causes, different ones though. Common symptoms can afftect speech (dysarthria), swallowing (dysphagia), choke on liquids, voice problem (dysphonia). Aspiration of food or fluids can lead to pneumonia and death. ...Read more

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Emg study for puffy feet reads . A fairly symmetric mild sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy with primarily axonal loss features. What are options?

Emg study for puffy feet reads . A fairly symmetric mild sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy with  primarily axonal loss features.  What are options?

It depends: The first thing would be to address possible underlying causes such as diabetes. There are medication which can help to minimize any symptoms of the neuropathy. ...Read more

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58 yrs.Old, 30% nerve damage, minimal peripheral vision loss. Mother's glaucoma uncontrolled. My prognosis diminished because of these factors?

Risk factors: Risk factors of glaucoma do include family history. With regular follow up visits and treatment , drops or stl laser surgery, your ophthalmologist will be able to maintain what you have now. Peripheral vision loss in irreversible. The important thing is to get the eye pressure low and prevent any flucuation of the pressure. Quarterly eye exams are the standard of care for this. ...Read more

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What is sensorimotor peripheral polyneuropathy?

What is sensorimotor peripheral polyneuropathy?

It Effect both: The sensory fiber of the nerve and motor fiber of the nerve. ...Read more

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Could anesthesia cause progressive supranuclear palsy (psp)?

Could anesthesia cause progressive supranuclear palsy (psp)?

Not likely: No one knows for sure what causes it. It is a degenerative neurologic disease a little similar to Parkinson's disease in a comparable area of the brain. The cause may be genetic, viral, though no one really knows. It is very very rare. ...Read more

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Prognosis (Definition)

The prognosis is the predicted outcome or "forecast" for a disease or process. It is only an estimate but is likely based on past experience or data taking into account the individual's overall health status. It may suggest progression of disease ...Read more


Dr. Bennett Machanic
1,473 doctors shared insights

Neuropathy (Definition)

A condition in which a person experiences weakness, numbness, and pain from nerve damage, usually in ...Read more