Top
10
Doctor insights on: Mr Pituitary Without Contrast

Share
1

1
Can MRI without contrast see pituitary tumour from cushings?

Can MRI without contrast see pituitary tumour from cushings?

Yes it might: If it shows, then it has been useful. But one can not exclude its presence if no contrast was used.. So if there is strong suspicion, then a repeat MRI with contrast may be more certain and more definitive study to rely on. ...Read more

2

2
Can a CT and MRI without contrast detect a pituitary tumour?

Can a CT and MRI without contrast  detect a pituitary tumour?

Yes it could: Ct is more dependent on contrast. But MRI has two phases(t1and t2) which can serve like a contrast and the tumors often show up better in t2 weighted images. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
3

3
Is it normal to have white under & behind a pituitary gland on MRI no contrast?

Is it normal to have white under & behind a pituitary gland on MRI no contrast?

Probably: I assume you are referring to the area surrounding the pituitary. This is the sella turcica, the portion of bone which protects it. At the posterior (back) of the pituitary, there is also a "bright spot" which is part of normal pituitary tissue. There are two completely different tissue types that make up the pituitary and they look different on mri. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
4

4
What can cause the pituitary gland to show up bright white on MRI with out contrast?

What can cause the pituitary gland to show up bright white on MRI with out contrast?

Posterior Pituitary: The posterior pituitary has intrinsic high t1 signal. It's thought to reflect the high concentration of neurosecretory granules in the neurohypophysis (posterior pituitary which stores/releases oxytocin ; vasopressin produced in hypothalamus). Absence of the normal posterior pituitary bright spot should prompt a search for an ectopic posterior pituitary that has failed to migrate from hypothalamus. ...Read more

5

5
Could a MRI with contrast fail to identify a pituitary tumor?

Could a MRI with contrast fail to identify a pituitary tumor?

Yes: Most pituitary tumors are "microadenomas", meaning that they are less than 1 CM in size. Mris done specifically to look for a pituitary tumor are very good at detecting tumors near 1 CM in size, and identify about 50% of tumors in the 0.3 CM size range, and would miss most tumors smaller than this. ...Read more

See 2 more doctor answers
6

6
What does a MRI of the pituitary gland check for? What kinds of abnormalities does it detect? Mri is without and then with contrast

What does a MRI of the pituitary gland check for? What kinds of abnormalities does it detect? Mri is without and then with contrast

Pituitary anatomy: Greetings, a pituitary MRI +\- contrast is done to evaluate the potential causes of pituitary hormone abnormalities. Typically, this would be looking for a pituitary adenoma, a benign tumor that can make excess hormones (eg-Prolactin) or damage the pituitary resulting in low hormone levels. Inflammation or a condition called an "empty sella" can also be seen and result in hormone problems. ...Read more

8

8
If I had a pituitary adonema would a standard brain MRI with and without contrast show it?

If I had a pituitary adonema would a standard brain MRI with and without contrast show it?

Maybe: Pituitary adenomas MRIs are very specific protocols. If you have a 'macroadenoma' which is larger than the normal gland, a routine MRI protocol would still likely show this. However, 'micoadenomas' can be only a few millimeters in size and a routine brain protocol MRI could miss it bases on scan slice thickness or it may not stand out within the normal tissue. ...Read more

See 2 more doctor answers
9

9
Does a head MRI both with and without contrast show if there is a problem or tumor in the pituitary gland?

Pituitary gland: Hi, yes, MRI is a very good imagining modality to evaluate posterior brain, but But MRI might not detect microadenomas that are smaller than 3 mm (about 1/8 inch) across, follow up imaging if there is any doubt could be helpful. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
10

10
Finding: a 1 mm focus of non-contrast or delayed contast enhancement involving the pituitary gland at the junction of the anterior and posterior lobes

Finding: a 1 mm focus of non-contrast or delayed contast enhancement involving the pituitary gland at the junction of the anterior and posterior lobes

Follow it: 1 mm sounds very small and non threatening. Recommend repeat study in 3 months and then annually if not enlarging. Doubtful that something that size is causing headaches, visual or endocrine problems. ...Read more