Top
20
Doctor insights on: Motor

Share
1

1
Are motor tics hereditary?

Are motor tics hereditary?

Yes and no: Motor movement disorders are usually inherited, but may also be acquired. Acquired tics are part of panda's, a neuroautoimmune disorder that causes inflammation in the brain's thalamus. This is caused by an auto-antibody triggered by streptococcus bacteria in certain people. The susceptibility to have an autoimmune reaction is likely inherited as well. http://www.pedrheumonlinejournal.org/apri. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
2

2
How are motor sensory and perceptual skills developed?

How are motor sensory and perceptual skills developed?

By exploration.: Children develop their motor sensory and perceptual skills by exploring their environment. When they are very young they explore a great deal with their mouth and this is why we see them m outhing objects. As they learn to get around by sitting up and rolling they can see more of their environment. As they crawl, walk, and climb they discover all that they can about their world. ...Read more

4

4
How are fine motor skills affected by intelligence?

How are fine motor skills affected by intelligence?

Learning is directly: related to cognitive ability; motor planning is an executive function. However, research done in Holland did not find a 1:1 correlation between IQ & fine motor (f.m.) skills. It did find an average 10-point decrease in scores on f.m. tests for every standard deviation or 15-point decrease in kids with IQ scores below 85. ~ 70% of people have IQ's of 85-115, the low-average- high average range. ...Read more

5

5
Whats multifocal motor neuropathy?

Whats multifocal motor neuropathy?

Neuropathy: Multifocal motor neuropathy is a progressive muscle disorder characterized by muscle weakness in the hands, with differences from one side of the body to the other in the specific muscles involved. It affects men much more than women. Symptoms also include muscle wasting, cramping, and involuntary contractions or twitching of the leg muscles. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
6

6
How does bulbar palsy relate to motor neuron diseases?

How does bulbar palsy relate to motor neuron diseases?

One of the causes: Bulbar palsy is an assortment of signs and symptoms, not the name of a precise disease. Bulbar palsy refers to impairment of function of the cranial nerves ix, x, xi and xii. Its causes are many and motor neuron disease (als) is one of them. ...Read more

7

7
How are fine motor skills affected by autism?

How are fine motor skills affected by autism?

Usually affected: Most children with autism have fine motor skills that are delayed and for some they never catch up even with years of therapy. This can make writing difficult as well as buttons, zippers, socks and even flushing a toilet. When a child is young it is important to address with therapy but also to remember that there are often other more useful skills they can acquire in spite of this deficit. ...Read more

8

8
Something in the cerebral hemispheres controlling motor function?

Something in the cerebral hemispheres controlling motor function?

Motor Stip: The cerebral hemispheres have the central fissure. Sort of sepeartes the front part of the brain from the back part of the brain. Anterior or closer to the eyes is a strip of brain that controls almost all motor function and behind the fissue is a strip that controls almost all sensory function. http://thebrain.mcgill.ca/flash/d/d_06/d_06_cr/d_06_cr_mou/d_06_cr_mou.html. ...Read more

9

9
What affects the body's motor skills?

What affects the body's motor skills?

Medical illness: Neurological problems like cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, lou Gehrig's disease and some neurological diseases and trauma Chemicals: intoxication, marijuana, inhalants many others ...Read more

10

10
Is motor and sensory function reduced during polydactyly?

Is motor and sensory function reduced during polydactyly?

No: Polydactyly simply refers to extra digits. The digits may be complete or partial. The nerve and vessel distribution in the extra digit depends upon its completeness and lack of syndactyly. ...Read more

11

11
Is palilalia and multiple motor tics equivalent to tourette syndrome?

Is palilalia and multiple motor tics equivalent to tourette syndrome?

Signs: Palilalia is a speech disorder when one repeats normal words or sentences and can occur as a manifestation of tourette's. Motor tics or abnormal movements are also common symptoms of tourette's. Theses signs can be symptoms but are not equivalent with the diagnosis. ...Read more

12

12
 how does low vision affect motor skill and coordination development?

 how does low vision affect motor skill and coordination development?

Well, : Its just common sense that one needs good vision to develop the best possible motor skill. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
13

13
Could neurofeedback help with aspergers. specifically motor skills and hand eye coordination?

Could neurofeedback help with aspergers. specifically motor skills and hand eye coordination?

No proven benefit: There are no randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled studies to support the claims of those who provide NFB to older kids & teens with Autistic Spectrum Disorder Level 1 & average or above IQ's. EEG Biofeedback has been used since the 70's. When kids with ASD/ADHD relax & focus on 2-dimensional figures on a screen, a preferred activity, they do well. It doesn't generalize outside the lab. ...Read more

14

14
Can boxing lessons help develop hand/eye coordination and fine motor skills?

Can boxing lessons help develop hand/eye coordination and fine motor skills?

Maybe..... Boxing : Can lead to a retina detachment if hit in the head repetitively. ...Read more

15

15
What are fine and gross motor skills?

What are fine and gross motor skills?

Little vs. big: Fine motor skills involve small movements (fingers, toes, lips, wrists, tongue) such as picking up a raisin, grabbing a cup. Gross motor skills involve larger muscles (arms, legs, trunk, feet) and big movements such as running, jumping, hopping, walking. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
16

16
Involuntary movements, lost of sensation, speech impairement and imsomnia?

Involuntary movements, lost of sensation, speech impairement and imsomnia?

Complex: Many possibilities, including multiple sclerosis, hereditary disorder, but could be variety of different causes, so see a neurologist asap, and get answers. ...Read more

17

17
Will neurofeedback help with aspergers. Specifically motor skills and hand eye coordination?

Will neurofeedback help with aspergers. Specifically motor skills and hand eye coordination?

I found a site : That mentions eye hand coordination as 1st thing it can help with, although they did not speak about aspergers here's the link http://www.brain2.com.au/service/neurofeedback ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
18

18
How does motor neuron disease progress?

How does motor neuron disease progress?

Depends: There are many different types of motor neuron diseases, each of which has its own unique progression (which is how we tell which one you might have oftentimes). You'll need to be more specific in order to get a good answer. If you think you have a motor neuron disease, you need to get to the doctor right away. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
19

19
Sudden onset of repeating oneself, difficulty writing> due to fine motor skills?

Sudden onset of repeating oneself, difficulty writing>  due to fine motor skills?

Writer's cramp: No single treatment strategy is appropriate for every case of writer's cramp. One of the most effective methods is adapting tasks to try to avoid triggering the dystonic movements--this may involve occupational therapy or using assistive/adapted devices. ...Read more

20

20
What are the symptoms accompany motor developmental delay (core movements)?

What are the symptoms accompany motor developmental delay (core movements)?

Lack of advances: Motor delay can be fine and/or gross motor delay, and gets evaluated at every pe. It starts with the baby not reaching for things, not holding their head up, and as they get older, the child will not manipulate objects well and will not stand or walk. Definitely a concern! ...Read more