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Doctor insights on: Mother Pneumonia Dialysis Will Kidney Transplant

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My mother is in the icu with pneumonia and sepsis, and now they are starting dialysis. Does that mean she will need a kidney transplant?

My mother is in the icu with pneumonia and sepsis, and now they are starting dialysis. Does that mean she will need a kidney transplant?

Probably not: Most patients who develop acute renal failure from septic shock will regain kidney function if they survive. My concern is that your mother may be developing multisystem organ failure which is a more pressing acute concern. ...Read more

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Dr. Gregory Moneta
3 doctors shared insights

Transplant (Definition)

In medicine: a transfer from one body or body part to another of an organ (liver, heart, lung, kidney, pancreas bowel) or tissue (hand, face, hair). The immune system fights foreign invaders (like infections) so it will reject transplants from other people (allotransplants) because they look like infections. So transplants usually require drugs to ...Read more


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I was wondering what are the differences between renal dialysis and kidney transplant?

I was wondering what are the differences between renal dialysis and kidney transplant?

Big difference: Both are ways to treat kidney failure. Dialysis is the cleansing of the blood of most impurities that build up without a functioning kidney. It can be done through a machine with filters or through a tube in the peritoneum (abdomen) to exchange fluids. A transplant means surgically implanting a new kidney to due to job of the old ones. ...Read more

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What's an alternative remedy for a patient with kidney failure aside from dialysis and kidney transplant?

Not remedy - death: Some patients with kidney failure who are not actively depressed, have tried dialysis and are not reasonable transplant candidates choose to withdraw from care and knowingly accept that they will die. This is allowed in the us but certainly not encouraged. A pulitzer prize winning author, james michener, decided after the age of 90 that he had written his last book and did withdraw from dialysis. ...Read more

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What happens if I voluntarily remove myself from the kidney transplant registry do medicare continue paying for dialysis?

Paying for dialysis: The answer to your question is "Yes". You do not have to have to be on a list for a kidney transplant in order for Medicare to continue to pay for your hemodialysis treatments. ...Read more

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My brother is going through dialysis 3 times a week.Kidney disease stage v. Can he be treated without kidney transplant.He is 27 yrs. Plz help.

Yes: He can remain on dialysis for as long as he is alive. He will have a significantly shorter life expectancy compared to a nondialysis patient. Transplanted patients however, have a significantly longer life expectancy than dialysis patients. In addition, patients with kidney transplants rate their quality of life much higher than dialysis patients. ...Read more

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My sister is in the hospital with kidney failure. Does she need an organ transplant right away? If she can't get a kidney transplant, will she be able to survive with just dialysis until she can get a donor?

My sister is in the hospital with kidney failure. Does she need an organ transplant right away? If she can't get a kidney transplant, will she be able to survive with just dialysis until she can get a donor?

The : The short answer is almost certainly "no", although every patient is different, and critical care patients by definition have complex medical stories. Acute kidney injury (or aki, also known as "acute renal failure") is very common in hospitalized patients, and particularly patients in intensive care (although you do not say your sister is actually in intensive care) there are degrees of kidney failure ranging from mild and quickly reversible, to permanent and complete. The kidneys are very sensitive to what is going on around them -- they're sort of the "canary in a coal mine" of our organ systems. So they tend to protest severe illness early by not making enough urine and allowing toxic byproducts to build up in the bloodstream. Fortunately, usually hospital acquired acute kidney failure goes away with minimal intervention. When it doesn't, the function of the kidneys can often (depending on the other medical circumstances) be replaced with a machine which removes the things the kidneys usually remove from the blood(dialysis). Dialysis isn't a perfect replacement for functioning kidneys by any means, but it's good enough for the short term, and many people live for decades on dialysis. Not every patient can benefit from dialysis -- the choice of whether to initiate dialysis is made on an individual basis. Kidney transplant is usually only made available to patients who have complete and permanent kidney failure, are dialysis dependent, and are doing very well otherwise. I hope you have found this helpful, and that your sister feels better soon. ...Read more

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Why's a kidney transplant a better solution to kidney damage than the use of a dialysis machine?

Why's a kidney transplant a better solution to kidney damage than the use of a dialysis machine?

Length and quality: Life expectancy for a person after kidney transplant is about double that of a person on dialysis. Also most but not all people say their quality of life after transplant is better than it was while on dialysis. ...Read more

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If a kidney transplant fails after 3 years, can the patient go back to dialysis to stay alive? Do the immunosuppressant medications need to be cont?

If a kidney transplant fails after 3 years, can the patient go back to dialysis to stay alive?  Do the immunosuppressant medications need to be cont?

No: The sole purpose for the immunosuppression is to keep the body from rejecting the graft and thus there is no reason to keep taking it if the transplant is no longer functioning. Yes you will need to get dialysis while waiting for another transplant. Best to check with your nephrologist to see if there may still be some residual function in the transplant before you stop the IS drug. ...Read more

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Can you tell me if i voluntarily remove myself from the kidney transplant registry do medicare continue paying for dialysis?

Can you tell me if i voluntarily remove myself from the kidney transplant registry do medicare continue paying for dialysis?

Contrinued payment: If you opt out of a particular treatment, Medicare or any other insurance cannot refuse to pay for other viable alternatives as long as those alternatives were covered services to begin with. No one can force you to have a certain treatment. If you understand the risk/benefit of your options and choices and are of sound mind, then you have every right to decide what is or isn't for you. ...Read more

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Is it possible for a chronic kidney stage 5 patient to prolong dialysis and kidney transplant by just specialised medication and strict diet?

Is it possible for a chronic kidney stage 5 patient to prolong dialysis and kidney transplant by just specialised medication and strict diet?

Yes: Yes; an appropriate (but relatively strict) diet would have to be adhered to as recommended by your nephrologist. Exercise and hydration are equally important. Stage v renal disease, however is near " end-stage" and will likely progress into renal failure at some time. Peritoneal dialysis is an extremely appropriate, and oftentimes under used/recommended option, especially for younger patients l. ...Read more

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Failure kidney transplant because recurrence of focal glomerulosclerosis also has global hypokinesia on dialysis no diabetics or heart disease . ?

Failure kidney transplant because recurrence of focal glomerulosclerosis also has global hypokinesia on dialysis no diabetics or heart disease . ?

Transplant: Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis or fsgs has recurrence rate of 10 % after transplant. You can get another transplant and decrease rate of recurrence by getting plasmapheresis and galactose therapy before next surgery. These therapies have been shown to reduce risk in selected group of patients. ...Read more

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My son is 62 and needs a kidney transplant. I am his mother, 82 years old, active and in excellent health. Can i donate to him?

My son is 62 and needs a kidney transplant. I am his mother, 82 years old, active and in excellent health. Can i donate to him?

Generous thought: Your age is likely a strong conta-indication to kidney donation. Surgical and post-operative risks, at your age, are considerable. Also remaining function of a single kidney, after donation at your age, may not be sufficient for you to remain in excellent health. In same vein, your single donated 82-year-old kidney may not be sufficient for your son. Discuss with transplant drs. ...Read more

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I've had a kidney transplant in the year 2005 and my mother donated the kidney. My creatinine is 1.7 right now. Is it safe for me to consume alcohol ?

I've had a kidney transplant in the year 2005 and my mother donated the kidney. My creatinine is 1.7 right now. Is it safe for me to consume alcohol ?

Yes, in moderation: Alcohol does not specifically harm kidney function although it does have a gentle diuretic effect. If there is no other specific health reason to avoid alcohol use (such as liver disease or other medication that should not be used with alcohol), then an occasional drink is reasonable. Of course, this must be done in a socially responsible manner (do not drink + drive, etc). ...Read more

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My mother needs a double lung transplant but possibly a kidney transplant first aswho are waiting for a transplant, actually get one in time?

My mother needs a double lung transplant but possibly a kidney transplant first aswho are waiting for a transplant, actually get one in time?

Donor lack: Your mother may be in the late 60's or be physiologically too old to be a candidate for those transplants. Your transplant surgeon is the only one to know. Unfortunately every year many transplant candidates never actually get to have any transplant because of lack of suitable donors in a timely fashion. ...Read more

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Been doing dialysis for 8 months. What are the chances of success if kidney transplantation is performed?

93-97%: The results following kidney transplant are 93% chance of being alive and off dialysis one year after kidney transplant. These chances improve if a live donor is available to donate a kidney. ...Read more

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I have had a kidney transplant 3 years ago and I suffer with osteoarthritis and I would like to take s -adenosylmethionine as I can't take Nsaids will?

I have had a kidney transplant 3 years ago and I suffer with osteoarthritis and I would like to take s -adenosylmethionine as I can't take Nsaids will?

Ask nephrologist: S-AME is not generally toxic to the kidneys, but you don't give any other medications or information about the nature of your kidney disease. There is a rare condition called Lesch-Nyan syndrome that can be worsened by s-AME. Your kidney physician and your pharmacist should be your primary source of information, and I recommend against depending solely on online sources. ...Read more

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Kidney transplant failed can I get another?

Yes: More than 90% of renal transplant recipients whose kidney fails years after transplant will get resisted for a re-transplant. However, the waiting time for these patients are no different than people waiting for their first kidney transplant. ...Read more

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How many years does a kidney transplant last?

How many years does a kidney transplant last?

Depends on source: It depends on the donor source and ages of the donor and recipient. About 90% of all kidney recipients are alive with a functioning graft at 1 year. Approximately 55% of living kidney recipients and 40% of deceased donor kidney recipients are alive with a functioning graft at 10 years. Some kidneys have lasted over 30 years. ...Read more

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Dr. Daniel Saurborn
14 doctors shared insights

Kidney Transplant (Definition)

Kidneys anatomically require connection to an artery for blood supply, a vein for blood drainage and the bladder for urine outflow. In a transplant a healthy kidney is disconnected from its usual attachments and moved to a new location with those 3 requirements (artery, vein, bladder). This may be an auto-txp - somewhere else in your own body; or an allo-txp -from ...Read more


Dr. Quresh Khairullah
515 doctors shared insights

Dialysis (Definition)

Simple answer is that it is a medical technology used primarily to provide an artificial replacement for lost kidney function in people with renal failure. Hemodialysis remove wastes and excess water from the blood by circulating blood outside the body through an external filter, called a dialyzer. Blood and dialysate flow through in opposite directions and the ...Read more