Top
20
Doctor insights on: Monoclonal

Share
1

1
Can you please explain the significance of monoclonal alpha chain without accompanying light chain?

Can you please explain the significance of monoclonal  alpha chain without accompanying light chain?

Abnormal globulin: The gammaglobulins, which are proteins that defend our body from different diseases are formed of two chains the light and the heavy chain. In certain diseases, such as multiple myeloma, one cell starts to produce one type of (or part of) gammaglobulin. This proteins are all the same (therefore "monoclonal") and usually non-functioning. It can accumulate in tissues producing more damage. ...Read more

2

2
What is/are the best test(s) for detecting a monoclonal plasma cell disorder? How sensitive are these tests? Which types of mpcds can they detect?

What is/are the best test(s) for detecting a monoclonal plasma cell disorder? How sensitive are these tests? Which types of mpcds can they detect?

SPEP: The best test is a serum protein electrophoresis. It is very sensitive and specific. The disease is rare in anyone under the age of 40. For the vast majority of people the disease does not progress for many years 10-20+ so there is no role for screening. ...Read more

3

3
What causes monoclonal paraproteinemia?

What causes monoclonal paraproteinemia?

Excess of Plasma cel: Plasma cells in our bone marrow make antibodies. Sometimes they become overly active/reactive and produce abnormal proteins called paraproteins. Most such protein production is benign and not uncommon in older folks. Sometimes it is excessive(more than 1gram/day) then we get concerned about a condition called multiple myeloma (paraproteins over 3 grams). ...Read more

4

4
What is monoclonal gammopathy?

What is monoclonal gammopathy?

A tumor type: There are various grades of monoclonal gammopathy. The three types, in increasing order of malignancy are monoclonal gammapathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), smoldering myeloma and the last one, which is a cancer, multiple myeloma. ...Read more

5

5
Monoclonal proteinemia, what is it?

Monoclonal proteinemia, what is it?

Excessive : Amounts of one type of protein in blood. It is usually the reflection of increased production, although abnormal protein structure or impaired destruction may play a role. Check with your doctor for additional details regarding your particular situation. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
7

7
What can cause monoclonal gammopathy?

What can cause monoclonal gammopathy?

Mayo Clinic say: Plasma cells are a type of white blood cell. They are found in your bone marrow. Plasma cells produce some of the antibodies that help your body fight infection. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance occurs when plasma cells in your bone marrow produce an abnormal protein called monoclonal protein (m protein). ...Read more

8

8
Are IgG lambda monoclonal bands common?

IgG lambda rare: Only 20% of all human igg use lambda light chains. Monoclonal bands are not common in general and may be benign or a sign of myeloma. Most a kappa. ...Read more

9

9
What's monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance?

MGUS: Is a common precancerous condition affecting people 50 years of age and older. It was first described by mayo clinic researchers in 1978 and is characterized by the presence of an abnormal protein in the blood called a (monoclonal) protein or m protein.Mgus has a small risk (1 percent each year) of progressing to a blood cancer called multiple myeloma or a related condition. ...Read more

10

10
How much is the percentage of monoclonal type to become carcinoma?

How much is the percentage of monoclonal type to become carcinoma?

What are you asking?: This sounds like a question arising during a poorly taught course on pathophysiology. A clinal overgrowth is either cancer or it's not. Criteria exist for the dusgnosis of boy benign and malignant clinal overgrowths. Perhaps your teacher or their supervisor can clarify. ...Read more

11

11
What are the differences between monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies?

What are the differences between monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies?

Antibody clonality: Each antibody molecule recognizes a specific target. A collection of identical antibodies that all recognize the exact same target is monoclonal. A collection of antibodies that each recognize different targets is polyclonal. For example, if you have a polyclonal antibody against bacteria, all the antibodies attach to the bacteria but at different locations on it. ...Read more

12

12
Can i treat a possible monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance at home?

Nope: You don't treat an mgus, it is a condition that can ultimately lead to multiple myeloma (risk is about 1% per year) but as of itself does not need therapy (assuming it was correctly diagnosed). You need to have labs checked at least 1 or 2 times a year so you should follow up with your doc indefinitely. ...Read more

13

13
What is the definition or description of: monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance?

What is the definition or description of: monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance?

A monoclonal: Gammopathy is an elevation in a specific type of immune protein in the blood. The work-up includes tests of urine protein, bones and blood production. If no serious associated disease is found then the clinical finding is called mgus. The patient is followed over time to see if the gammopathy becomes "significant." some patients declare themselves later with multiple myemoma or lymphoma. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
14

14
What are possible causes of highly elevated ImM levels with low ImG levels with no monoclonal gammopathy present?

May not be a problem: This may depend on your genetic background and not be a medical problem. We would need an explanation of your problems, blurred vision, night sweats. Why are you on opiates ...Read more

See 2 more doctor answers
15

15
Ideop Neurop, IPE=Monoclonal IGGlambada present. No free lambda light chains seen. Mprotein seen below threshold IPE. SI all in ranges Igg 1.4. mean?

Ideop Neurop, IPE=Monoclonal IGGlambada present. No free lambda light chains seen.  Mprotein seen below threshold IPE. SI all in ranges Igg 1.4. mean?

Neuropathy in MGUS: Periphral neuropathy is common in gammopathies. If just sensory (numbness/tingling) we follow it or treat symptoms. If there is motor involvement (muscle weakness) it may need treatment. Risk of converson to a bone marrow disease is about 1% per year. You need to be followed by a neurologist/rheumatologist (if interested in neuropathies). MGUS means monoclonal gammopathy of unknown signifcance. ...Read more

16

16
Whats a monoclonal antibody?

Whats a monoclonal antibody?

Antibody to one site: Monoclonal antibodies (mab or moab) are monospecific antibodies that are the same because they are made by identical immune cells that are all clones of a special parent cell. Monoclonal antibodies have monovalent affinity. That is, they bind to the same epitope/site. These can be used in treating cancer, autoimmune diseases, like rheumatoid arthritis, and in diagnostic tests, like western blot. ...Read more

17

17
What are monoclonal antibodies?

What are monoclonal antibodies?

All the same: Antibodies are complex protein molecules made by the immune system. The have a variable portion that can be made specific to a target. "monoclonal" refers to antibodies whose variable regions are all the same. When directed at specific biological targets, e.g. Inflammatory mediators, they can be used as drugs ("biologics") to modify diseases. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
18

18
What are these monoclonal antibodies?

What are these monoclonal antibodies?

Abs from one cell.: Monoclonal antibodies are those that are produced by the identical immune cells that are descended from the same parent cell. They produce anitibodies that bind to only one epitope or site on an antigen. This means that they are monospecific. This makes them useful in things like research because they can isolate a strain purely and completely. ...Read more

19

19
Hello..What is the monoclonal antibody?How it works?

Hello..What is the monoclonal antibody?How it works?

Monoclonal antibody: A monoclonal antibody means that it is a specific antibody made by a cell, and that all the antibodies are the same. Usually this is done to try to target a specific receptor on a cell or virus. For instance if a scientist finds a susceptible part of a virus and wants to target it, they will try to create an monoclonal antibody to bind to it. This process is done for a multitude of reasons. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
20

20
What is monoclonal gammopathie IgM kappa?

What is monoclonal gammopathie IgM kappa?

Plasma cell disorder: Monoclonal gammopathy refers to an abnormal production of proteins by cells in the immune system (plasma cells) that are growing out of control. It can be one of the signs of myeloma. A hematologist-oncologist can help. ...Read more