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Doctor insights on: Mitochrondial Dna

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Etiology of DNA mutations?

Etiology of DNA mutations?

Replication error: Most changes in dna come from errors in the duplication of the dna. But changes can occur in the structure from radiation and some chemicals especially those used in chemotherapy. Most mutations are harmless, some are tracked down by your normal reparative mechanism but a few can cause trouble including cancer. ...Read more

Dna (Definition)

Dna are the coding molecules found in all living things on earth which contain the instructions on how to build living things. Its is comprised the nucleotide molecules which are ...Read more


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Cause of a positive monoclonal T cell beta gene rearrangement?

Cause of a positive monoclonal T cell beta gene rearrangement?

Tumor: Monoclonal proliferation of lymphoid cells is usually an indication of tumor of the lymphoid tissue. ...Read more

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How is DNA mutated by carcinogens ?

How is DNA mutated by carcinogens ?

DNA breakdown: Carcinogens can cause cells to rapidly divide in response to the continual attack on their survival. With this high cell turnover coves oxidative/free radical damage (stealing of electrons) and in many case errors in dna sequencing resulted in a mutated dna stand. The body sees this imperfect dna strand as a foreign invader and eliminates it through the immune system. ...Read more

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Does DNA or genes cause chromosomal abnormalities?

Does DNA or genes cause chromosomal abnormalities?

Chromosomal: Chromosomes are the packaging for the genes. Genes are made up of dna. Chromosomal abnormalities are extra chromosomes, deletions, duplications, or translocations of large chunks of dna. ...Read more

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hepatitis b surface antigen reactive and hepatitis b surface antibody nonreactive and core antibody total reactive and HBV DNA detected sir plz reply?

 hepatitis b surface antigen reactive and hepatitis b surface antibody nonreactive and core antibody total reactive and HBV DNA detected sir plz reply?

You carry hep B: I am assuming you feel well and this was a surprise finding. There are millions of people like yourself. You will require lifelong health care for it unless / until a means of eradicating it is found. You pose no danger to a partner who is immunized. ...Read more

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What chromosome is mutated in sickle cell disease?

What chromosome is mutated in sickle cell disease?

11: The beta globin gene is mutated in sickle cell anemia; it is located on chromosome 11. ...Read more

Dr. Jay Park Dr. Park
2 doctors agreed:
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What chromosome carries the gene for sickle cell anemia?

Dr. Jay Park Dr. Park
2 doctors agreed:
What chromosome carries the gene for sickle cell anemia?

Chromosome No. 11: Point mutation at beta-globin gene located at chromosome no. 11 results in production of defective hemoglobin, sickle hemoglobin. ...Read more

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What is hemagglutinin (ha) gene and neuraminidase (na) gene?

What is hemagglutinin (ha) gene and neuraminidase (na) gene?

Flu virus genes: The hemaglutinin and neuraminidase genes are in influenza viruses. They code for proteins that are found on the surface of the flu virus. The viruses are named according to which type of hemaglutinin and neuraminidase proteins are on their surfaces (for example: h1n1 or h7n9). ...Read more

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Hbv DNA viral load result: 451.35 iu/ml (1895.67 copies/ml) HBsAG 4.441 and antihbs 0.10. What does this mean? Thank you!

Hbv DNA viral load result: 451.35 iu/ml (1895.67 copies/ml) HBsAG 4.441 and antihbs 0.10. What does this mean? Thank you!

Hepatitis B carrier: You are a hepatitis b carrier - with high levels of hepatitis b surface antigen (hbsag) as well as hbv dna positive. You should see a hepatologist, a liver md for treatment. In this era, there are medications that can suppress hbv dna replication, i.e. Decrease the generation of new viral particles, decreasing injury to the liver and long term complications, such as cirrhosis and liver cancer. ...Read more

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I've achromatopsia, which chromosome is affected?

I've achromatopsia, which chromosome is affected?

Several: Rod monochromatism is most common form of achromatopsia, inherited as autosomal recessive condition; it can be can be caused by more than one gene mutation. So far, mutations or variants of any of 4 genes, cnga3, cngb3, gnat2 and recently pde6c, have been linked to each causing rod monochromatism. These 4 genes appear to account for about 79% of cases of rod monochromatism. See comment below—>. ...Read more

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Electron transport chains and ATP synthase enzymes are embedded within what?

Electron transport chains and ATP synthase enzymes are embedded within what?

Mitochondria: It sounds like you have been reading about mitochondria, the powerhouse organelle of cells. These organelles use methods to create the cellular currency of energy, Adenosine triphosphate. You probably read that a portion of the ATP synthase complex is embedded in the mitochondrial membrane. Read about it here: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3278611/ You can consult me if you have Q's ...Read more

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Blood flow cytmtry shows dual positive cd4cd30 cells absolute count of 2354. IGG slightly elevated with elevated light chains, T cell Beta clone noted?

Blood flow cytmtry shows dual positive cd4cd30 cells absolute count of 2354. IGG slightly elevated with elevated light chains, T cell Beta clone noted?

Asking what?: If your are requesting a diagnosis online, this is not the appropriate venue. Though the flow cytometry results are not totally normal, your results should be reviewed with the physician who ordered it. This format does not give us the ability to determine if your clinical presentation and lab results are consistent with a specific diagnosis. ...Read more

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What damages mitochondria?

Damage: Yes there is potential for some damage. Take your time and go online to read and understand the several articles that should help you. Ask a question later if there is something you read that troubles you. ...Read more

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Which genes control cell growth in pancreatic tissue?

Which genes control cell growth in pancreatic tissue?

There are: literally millions of genes that control cell growth not only in pancreatic tissue but throughout the entire body. Why do you ask? ...Read more

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Elevated EBV ab VCA IgG <8 and EBV nucleaer antigen ab IgG test 4.2. & anti-dna(ss)igg ab qn ( 119)& c react protien(5.6) what are implications?

Elevated EBV ab VCA IgG <8 and EBV nucleaer antigen  ab IgG test 4.2. & anti-dna(ss)igg ab qn ( 119)& c react protien(5.6)  what are implications?

Nothing.: Ebv antibodies indicate you had a previous infection, but not active. The c-reactive protein needs a units indicator - that is either normal or somewhat elevated. The anti ss dna is extremely nonspecific and very rarely indicated; I have no idea why that was ordered, discuss with your doctor. ...Read more

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Can autoantibodies against glutamine synthetase and/or glutamate dehydrogenase cause glutamate metabolism disorders?

Can autoantibodies against glutamine synthetase and/or glutamate dehydrogenase cause glutamate metabolism disorders?

Still searching: Glutamine synthase is part of the glutamine synthetase family. Ammonia incorporation in animals occurs through the actions of glutamate dehydrogenase and glutamine synthase. Glutamate plays the central role in mammalian nitrogen flow, serving as both a nitrogen donor and nitrogen acceptor. I am unble to find references in my search so far as to autoantibodies to these but see comment. ...Read more

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What is a hereditary hemochromatosis DNA mutation?

What is a hereditary hemochromatosis DNA mutation?

Gene Mutation: This is a mutation in one of the genes that help to process iron absorption. The mutation, if present in 2 copies, can cause too much iron to be absorbed. The excess iron then deposits in other organs and can cause disease - cirrhosis, diabetes, impotence. Having only one mutation may not lead to disease. You should discuss this with your doctor to see if you are at risk of developing disease. ...Read more

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Is diffused b cell lymphoma genetic?

Is diffused b cell lymphoma genetic?

Not really: While there may be a genetic suscepibiltiy to developing lymphoma it is not truly a genetic disease. ...Read more

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What happens when DNA gets damaged?

What happens when DNA gets damaged?

The cell may die,: the damage may be repaired and the cell lives normally, or the damage may cause a mutation that leads to a pathologic state(e.g. cancer) or the expression of new traits. ...Read more

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Can DNA be changed using frequency?

Can DNA be changed using frequency?

DNA changeability?: Nope. Not in the general sense. This question may be out of the bounds of expertise in medicine if you need something specific in a research scenario or are looking for cancer causes.... ...Read more

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What is the definition of DNA forensics?

What is the definition of DNA forensics?

DNA forensics: DNA forensics = technique used to identify individuals by characteristics of their deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) which can be used for legal purposes. ...Read more

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How long does a DNA patenity test take ?

DNA paternity test: The technical part of dna paternity test is not taking that long. However, it is usually a court order for that and with legal procedures it might take up to 3 month. ...Read more

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What is the definition or description of: dna?

What is the definition or description of: dna?

Genetic code: Dna are the coding molecules found in all living things on earth which contain the instructions on how to build living things. Its is comprised the nucleotide molecules which are paired in specific ways. ...Read more

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What is the implication of elevated single strand dna?

What is the implication of elevated single  strand dna?

Auto-Immune Disorder: I think what you are asking is "elevation of anti-bodies to single strand dna". This means that you body is producing antibodies to specifically target proteins found throughout your body. This is process scene in some common rheumatologic disorders. I would suggest that since you are on Plaquenil (hydroxychloroquine) you physician is already aware of this or at least had the correct suspicion. ...Read more

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What are repetative sequence in dna? What is there role?

DNA: With ability to do repetitive sequence dna, it opens up avenue to make specific diagnosis. ...Read more

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What are the 3 three main steps in the process of DNA replication?

What are the 3 three main steps in the process of DNA replication?

DNA replication: I would go to wikipedia for this. Cannot think of only 3 steps. There are many more. But if you are taking a class I would look it up in the class text book. ...Read more

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How close could someone DNA who isnt related? Could everything match but 2 things?

How close could someone DNA who isnt related?  Could everything match but 2 things?

It's complicated...: Dna tests don't compare every gene-pair in one person with those in another person. Instead, there are many types of tests. The tests look at only some sections of people's dna. One can ask the person doing the test which kind of test it is and how likely it is for various matches to occur. Lots of information is at: http://en.Wikipedia.Org/wiki/dna_profiling. ...Read more

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Is it possible to go for DNA in nigeria,for hw long is it takin,how much does it cause,?

Is it possible to go for DNA in nigeria,for hw long is it takin,how much does it cause,?

Clarify please...: DNA, as in the carrier of our genetic information? or is that an abbreviation for something else that you are asking about. ...Read more

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Is there a way to have your DNA altered so you have 0% chance of having a child with downs?

Is there a way to have your DNA altered so you have 0% chance of having a child with downs?

Not a chance: At any age all pregnancies have about 4% risk of an unexpected outcome.(Premi, cleft palate, infection,DS,etc) As you pass 40 you begin to add higher risk of DS,as lifelong exposures to toxins affects egg quality.You can get non-invasive (mother's blood) information on a pregnancy as early as 8-10 wks with NIPP.This test commonly done for paternity can also detect DS very early. ...Read more

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Could two people who are not related share the same DNA everything but 3 things say excluded?

Genetics: I am not sure what you mean by '3 things say excluded'. But no two people not related cannot share the same dna. ...Read more

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How safe is it to get a DNA on a baby before its born? And how far along do you need to be? How is it done?

How safe is it to get a DNA on a baby before its born? And how far along do you need to be? How is it done?

Fetal DNA -: hello ! Firstly, fetal DNA comes from fetal cord sample, done after 16 wks AND before 21 weeks under u/sound. Its risky, significant risk of miscarriage, but if you are looking for significant disease AND are prepared to abort the pregnancy if you find it, then its invaluable. I would NOT advise it if you are not prepared to have an abortion if the fetus proved +ve for the disease you are seek.THX ...Read more

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The double strand break in DNA used in Crispr tecnique, is this alteration then passed on to the offspring and future generations..?!

The double strand break in DNA used in Crispr tecnique, is this alteration then passed on to the offspring and future generations..?!

Depends : If it is done in germ line tissue -I.e. Eggs or sperm cells - then those changes are passed to future progeny. If the cells that have been altered are not in the germ line then they only affect that individual. ...Read more

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Do all or most blacks get high unassigned levels on 23andme dna ancestry test at the 90% confidence level? I did. Is this common for blacks?

Do all or most blacks get high unassigned levels on 23andme dna ancestry test at the 90% confidence level?  I did.  Is this common for blacks?

Uncertain: Your best bet is to ask the site what type of genetic material they have. This is how they develop the profile. Your suggestion sounds like it is valid but it is best to ask the source. ...Read more