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Doctor insights on: Memory Loss Testing

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Diagnosis: right to left shunt now what? I've been experiencing headaches and memory loss, my np referred me to a neurologist. Results from testing were sent to np. I just left her office with a follow up to see neurologist again but the diagnosis is rig

Diagnosis: right to left shunt now what? I've been experiencing headaches and memory loss, my np referred me to a neurologist.  Results from testing were sent to np. I just left her office with a follow up to see neurologist again but the diagnosis is rig

The : The heart has two "sides": the right side pumps blood to the lungs for oxygenation and the left side pumps it to the body. A right to left shunt is one that sends blood directly from the right side to the left, bypassing the lungs. This is important fro two reasons: 1) the shunted blood does not have the opportunity to drop off carbon dioxide and pick up oxygen. If the shunt is large, it will reduce the amount of oxygen in your blood and leave you easily winded. 2) the lung, in addition to increasing the oxygen level in the blood, filters out any tiny clots or other particles in the blood. When that filter is missing, there's an increased risk of strokes. Since you have a right to left shunt, you should probably be on a blood thinner, and you should make sure that any IV lines you have placed are freed of all bubbles (the common idea that a few bubbles in a vein will cause damage is not true--unless you have a right to left shunt. Treatment depends on the size of the shunt and its location. If it's very small, you may need nothing. However, if it's big enough to create problems (and it sounds like yours is) then it probably needs to be closed. If it's in the heart, this is done by a cardiologist using a percutaneous closure device or by a cardiac surgeon using traditional open-heart surgery. If it is in the arteries of the lung, it is treated by an interventional radiologist using small artery-blocking coils placed via a puncture in the hip area or the neck. I don't know the joliet area well enough to know who's close by, but you can go to http://doctor-finder.Sirweb.Org/ to find an interventional radiologist in your area. One other thing: shunts in the lung arteries are associated with a condition called osler-weber-rendu syndrome (also know as hereditary hemorrhagic telangietasia). You should be evaluated for this condition and, if you have it, your relatives should be evaluated too. It has a strong family inheritance pattern. ...Read more

Dr. Bennett Machanic
382 doctors shared insights

Memory Loss (Definition)

Memory loss is a symptom in which a person cannot recall (remember) something that he previously learned. Some memory loss is normal, such as not remembering facts learned in school years ago but not used since then. Other memory loss is abnormal, such as that caused by Alzheimer's Dementia ...Read more


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Grand mal seizure i had one 3/31. Am going through neuro. Testing now: mri, ct, 2 decho, eeg, etc. I now have short-term memory loss & have trouble completing my sentennces. I knlow the word, but can't get it from brain to mouth, & can't remember a

Grand mal seizure i had one 3/31.  Am going through neuro. Testing now:  mri, ct, 2 decho, eeg, etc.  I now have short-term memory loss & have trouble completing my sentennces.  I knlow the word, but can't get it from brain to mouth,  & can't remember  a

Encephalopathy: Our brains change with age. Many factors will contribute to the risk for seizures and memory and speech problems. Your doctors will need to evaluate you thoroughly for metabolic problems, blood pressure problems, risk of stroke, risk of cancer, risk of neuro-degenerative disease, etc. I am sure they will provide the necessary and appropriate treatment to help you stay functional and content. ...Read more

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3 small nonspecific lesions. Lyme disease negative. Now being tested for nerve damage and memory loss, all thats left is stroke and ms, limbs tingle?

3 small nonspecific lesions. Lyme disease negative. Now being tested for nerve damage and memory loss, all thats left is stroke and ms, limbs tingle?

MS is possible: Assume you have 3 small brain white matter lesions, but your sensory symptoms and memory issues, could well be a sign of ms, or prior strokes. Can sort out by getting MRI of neck and MRI of gray matter using dir techniques, as extra lesion on these films could confirm ms. Maybe spinal fluid would help. Talk with your doctor, should be able to pin down. ...Read more

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What causes Memory loss?

What causes Memory loss?

Memory loss: Can be caused by numerous events including strokes/trauma, medications or drugs, and illnesses such as Alzheimer’s dementia/other diseases. The complaint of memory impairment requires a careful evaluation and workup to rule out organic causes due to the multitude of possible causes. If it occurred suddenly this directs the M.D. to investigate accordingly, for example. ...Read more

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Severe memory loss? Causes?

Many causes: The common causes of memory loss are usually metabolic developments found in older peoples' brains. When a young man suffers marked memory loss, head trauma, drugs abuse and induced severe hypoglycemia, must be at the top of your list. Remember those cases of amnesia reported that happen, because of intent to treat to cause amnesia. ...Read more

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What is good for memory loss?

What is good for memory loss?

Depends upon cause: If sleep deprivation or sleep apnea with daytime hyper somnolence, might use Nuvigil. Would check for thyroid or vitamin issues and treat specifically, and if infection such as syphilis or HIV, use appropriate meds. Drugs for Alzheimers may be useful in alternative conditions, especially head injury. Some medical foods like Cerefolin-NAC and Axona can be valuable. ...Read more

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What could cause memory loss?

What could cause memory loss?

Memory loss: Memory loss is caused by many factors such as age, health, mental health, medication use, history of head injury, metabolic and environmental factors. Immediate recall is the most susceptible followed by short term memory followed by long term memory. ...Read more

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Dr. Paul Gilson
404 doctors shared insights

Amnesia (Definition)

Amnesia is a condition where you are unable to remember new events (anterograde amnesia) and/or you ...Read more


Dr. Bennett Machanic
1,789 doctors shared insights

Memory (Definition)

Memory is the ability to recall information ...Read more