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Doctor insights on: Medicine For Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery Syndrome

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How common is it for somebody to get posterior inferior cerebellar artery syndrome?

How common is it for somebody to get posterior inferior cerebellar artery syndrome?

Depends: In the general population, it is rare. However, among people with strokes, it is common enough to have an eponym (wallenberg syndrome). ...Read more

Dr. Creighton Wright
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Artery (Definition)

Arteries are defined as blood vessels which carry blood away from the heart (to either the body or lungs). Arteries: higher pressure, thicker walls, stretch (pulse) with each heart contraction & deliver blood to the arterioles which control the flow to individual capillaries. Veins are blood vessels which carry blood from capillaries back to the heart (body to right heart; ...Read more


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What is the definition or description of: Posterior inferior cerebellar artery syndrome?

What is the definition or description of: Posterior inferior cerebellar artery syndrome?

Wallenberg Syndrome: The posterior inferior cerebellar syndrome or other names include Wallenberg Syndrome or the Dorsal Medullary Syndrome is a stroke/infarction in the distribution of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery. The clinical symptoms include cerebellar ataxia/dysmetria on the ipsilateral side and sensory loss on the contralateral side. ...Read more

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What is the treatment for posterior inferior cerebellar artery syndrome?

What is the treatment for posterior inferior cerebellar artery syndrome?

Stroke: Pica occlusion can cause a complex brainstem cerebellar syndrome, and is usually a consequence of obstruction in the vertebral-basilar circulation at the base of brain. Although many meds will be useful, a combination of physical therapy, vestibular rehab, and occupational therapy will often be best. Do not neglect medication to prevent future strokes, such as aggrenox. ...Read more

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My wife thinks I should see neurologist for my posterior inferior cerebellar artery syndrome. Should i?

My wife thinks I should see neurologist for my posterior inferior cerebellar artery syndrome. Should i?

Stroke neurologist: Quite a question because usually it would be a neurologist, and more specifically one who specializes in stroke who would refer by name to the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (pica). This artery may be a problem if it is blocked (stroke), or there is an aneurysm or arteriovenous malformation associated. Further evaluation by a stroke specialist would determine if this is worrisome or not. ...Read more

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Tinnitus+ache l ear.Mri suggests impingement of l inferior cerebellar artery on the origin of l 9th nerve, but "does not explain all symptons" views?

Tinnitus+ache l ear.Mri suggests impingement of l inferior cerebellar artery on the origin of l 9th nerve, but "does not explain all symptons" views?

No: The 9th cranial nerve is for sensation in the pack of the throat as well as for swallowing. It does not produce tinnitus nor does it produce any sensation in the ear. ...Read more

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New neurologist look at MRI scans, says left cerebellar atrophy old, foetal type posterior communicat artery and hypoplastic rva to pica.I am lost now?

New neurologist look at MRI scans, says left cerebellar atrophy old, foetal type posterior communicat artery and hypoplastic rva to pica.I am lost now?

No: I saw an autopsy of a pt who had a congenitally absent cerebellum which was an incidental finding --no ax and unrelated to pts death. ...Read more

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Migraine history MRA/MRI results: right A1 anterior cerebral artery is hypoplastic. Right P1 posterior cerebral artery is markedly hypoplastic. Low lying cerebellar tonsils, no chiari. Borderline high riding left jugular bulb.What's the significance?

Migraine history MRA/MRI results: right A1 anterior cerebral artery is hypoplastic. Right P1 posterior cerebral artery is markedly hypoplastic. Low lying cerebellar tonsils, no chiari. Borderline high riding left jugular bulb.What's the significance?

How it is: The description you provided describes the anatomy seen on the MRA/MRI
The significance needs to be correlated with your clinical exam and findings.
Without more information difficult to say much more. Consult your ordering physician for complete diagnosis. ...Read more

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Absent posterior communicating arteries. Anything I should be aware of with this? They have no idea if it's from birth or ...Something else

Absent posterior communicating arteries. Anything I should be aware of with this? They have no idea if it's from birth or ...Something else

Congenital: If that is all that was revealed on an imaging study, there is no reason to be concerned about intracranial or brain disease. This has nothing to do with your migraines, or ptsd, and is most certainly, a congenital variation you have possessed your entire lifetime. ...Read more

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How does blood flow from the mesenteric arteries to the posterior vena cava?

How does blood flow from the mesenteric arteries to the posterior vena cava?

Blood flow: Blood flow from the mesenteric arteries to the inferior vena cava-VC is a little complex. The blood travels via the mesenteric arteries to the end organ where is travels through smaller and smaller arteries until it enters capillaries. From there the capillaries merge to form veins that are part of the portal system. This travels to the liver where is goes through a similar cycle and then into VC. ...Read more

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Is a more robust posterior communicating artery on right then left worrisome or normal?

Is a more robust posterior communicating artery on right then left worrisome or normal?

Not usually: I'm assuming that you are referring to the posterior communicating artery providing blood flow to the right side of the brain. This is usually a congenital (inborn) change and does not usually produce problems in normal patients. Take care and stay healthy! ...Read more

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MRA revealed Small right and Rudimentery left posterior communicating arteries. What does this mean?

MRA revealed Small right and Rudimentery left posterior communicating arteries. What does this mean?

There: are various normal anatomic variations in this region, and small PCAs are a common one. It simply means that these arteries are underdeveloped...relatively small in caliber...compared to other arteries around the Circle of Willis region. ...Read more

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Is the posterior tibial or peroneal artery a superficial artery? Is there a superficial artery along the lateral aspect of the achilles?

Is the posterior tibial or peroneal artery a superficial artery? Is there a superficial artery along the lateral aspect of the achilles?

Arteries to the foot: The posterior tibial is rather situated medial and deep in the hindfoot, essentially supplying the plantar (bottom) of your foot. The dorsalis pedis supplies the top (dorsal) foot. The fibular (peroneal) artery provides blood to the leg's lateral compartment. ...Read more

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In a recent exam my mom discovered that, she don't have the posterior cerebral artery. Is this normal?

In a recent exam my mom discovered that, she don't have the posterior cerebral artery. Is this normal?

There are 2.: Normally there are 2 posterior cerebral arteries. If one or both are missing it is abnormal. ...Read more

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Can you please define fetal origin of the right posterior cerebral artery?

Can you please define fetal origin of the right posterior cerebral artery?

See below: The posterior cerebral artery has its origin from the right carotid artery instead of from the basilar artery. This is a common anatomic variation that can occur in up to 30% of the population. ...Read more

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What happens if your posterior descending arterial branch of the right coronary artery diffuse proximal 60 to 80%?

What happens if your posterior descending arterial branch of the right coronary artery diffuse proximal 60 to 80%?

Depends: Many people walk around with significant blockages without knowledge or harm. If the person described has angina or evidence of ischemia on testing, a percutaneous intervention should be considered. Otherwise, forget it - but treat the underlying arteriosclerosis: statin, aspirin, Mediterranean Diet, exercise, ideal body weight, no smoking, good BP control. ...Read more

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Posterior cervical fusion which resulted in misplaced screw abutting vetebral artery. Surgeons recommend not to remove, may cause bleeding.

Complex descicion: Removing may very well be riskier than leaving it bleeding from the vert can be life threatening and of course stroke is ever present danger. Cerebral endovascular work has made recent great advancements you might ask interventionslist on the stroke team esp if there is a neuro surgeon on the team with cerebral endovascular experience if they have ...Read more

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What does "minimal ectasia versus tiny aneurysm of the P1 segment of the left posterior cerebral artery" mean??

Artery wider there: Slight widening of the cerebral artery compared to the majority of the artery. No need for concern but needs to be followed by serial scans. Suggest MRI because of less (0) radiation over the years ...Read more

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What does it mean when "minimal ectasia versus tiny aneurysm of the P1 segment of the left posterior cerebral artery?"

Abnormality: The wording suggests that one if the blood vessels that supplies the posterior part of your brain is dilated. This could be from weakening of the walls of the vessel most likely from a congenital problem in the young and atherosclerosis in the elderly. ...Read more

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Who is the best doctor in the country to treat severe stenosis in the distal p2 segment of the right posterior cerebral artery?

Hard to answer: The first thing to answer is whether you need treatment for it. If so, you are looking at an interventional neuroradiologist who would potentially treat the narrowing with ballon angioplasty. This is not a procedure without risk! ...Read more

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Hello, I have had a CT scan of my head and neck. I understand most of what is stated below except the "The posterior indicating arteries are hypoplast?

Hello, I have had a CT scan of my head and neck. I understand most of what is stated below except the "The posterior indicating arteries are hypoplast?

Posterior arteries: Perhaps the reference was to the Posterior Communicating Arteries of the base of the brain called the circle of Willis. These smaller arteries connect the larger cerebral arteries and provide collateral circulation in case of blockage in a critical artery. CT scan may not show vasculature clearly and this finding may not be clinically relevant ...Read more

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Hello, I had a CT scan of my head and neck..I understand everything below except "The posterior indicating arteries are hypoplastic". ?

Hello,
I had a CT scan of my head and neck..I understand everything below except "The posterior indicating arteries are hypoplastic". ?

CT Head/neck: Probably is the "Posterior Communicating arteries" and the transcriptionist typed in Indicating, as I am not familiar with "indicating arteries." The posterior Communicating arteries are in the back of the base of the brain/skull and Hypoplastic is underdevelopment or incomplete development of a tissue or organ. This could be a congenital issue,...check with your Doctor to be safe for correlation. ...Read more

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Diplopia, squeezing band of pressure in head, absent L posterior inferior cerebral artery. chol/hdl calc 6.7. FH mutation. could this cause stroke/tia?

Diplopia, squeezing band of pressure in head, absent L posterior inferior cerebral artery. chol/hdl calc 6.7. FH mutation. could this cause stroke/tia?

No: Minor anatomic variants of the arteries in the back part of the brain are no big deal. Sorry for misunderstanding -- I'm glad your FH / familial hypercholesterolemia was detected & can be managed. Without other findings, band and diplopia are unlikely to be serious ischemic disease, but are classic "functional". You're right to be concerned as such headaches, even if not "stroke", can disable. ...Read more

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An MRI to test for HCM says There is a tortuous descending aorta. There is an aberrant right subclavian artery which courses posterior to the trachea?

An MRI to test for HCM says There is a tortuous descending aorta.  There is an aberrant right subclavian artery which courses posterior to the trachea?

MRI answers nothing: The MRI answers nothing about HCM. The descending aorta being tortuous points to a long history of hypertension, smoking, and/or high cholesterol. The right subclavian normally passes in front of (not behind) the windpipe. This anomaly probably doesn't mean much, u were probably born with it. With HCM, you want to get an idea of how narrow the outflow tract (aortic valve) is, which is not given. ...Read more

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MRI =Mild" thickening of heart muscle not HOCM.Tortuous descending aorta. Aberrant right subclavian artery which courses posterior to the trachea. ??

MRI =Mild" thickening of heart muscle not HOCM.Tortuous descending aorta. Aberrant right subclavian artery which courses posterior to the trachea. ??

Mild thickening's OK: See my comment to your previous post regarding the other findings (tortuous aorta, subclavian artery). The mild thickening of the heart muscle is common, and not necessarily from HCM. It could be the effects of long-standing hypertension. Keeping ur BP low with a -pril or a -sartan (Enalapril, Valsartan, etc.) could even reverse the thickening of the heart. Thanks 4 ur question on HealthTap, & GL! ...Read more

Cerebellum (Definition)

An area in the back of the brain that helps coordinate movement, speech, and eye movements. It has connections to the frontal lobes also and may play a role in helping you ...Read more