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Doctor insights on: Medicine For Furosemide Allergy

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Dr. Jan Tillisch
402 Doctors shared insights

Furosemide (Definition)

Furosemide is a potent diuretic which increases dramatically urine output in most patients. It is most frequently used in patients who are fluid overloaded such as in congestive heart failure. Potassium, sodium and magnesium can be lost in excess with the use of Furosemide and must be closely monitored. It is much stronger than other diuretics used for ...Read more


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I'm currently on prednisone, lisinpril, have a serious allergy to sulfa so is this drug furosemide safe for me to take?

I'm currently on prednisone, lisinpril, have a serious allergy to sulfa so is this drug furosemide safe for me to take?

Sulfa allergy: Lasix (furosemide) may pose a problem for you if you have a sulfa allergy. If you need a diuretic, etacrynic acid, which is potent and has no sulfa is a good choice. Speak to your physician. Good luck. ...Read more

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What to do if I have serious allergy to toradol, can I take a water pill?

What to do if I have serious allergy to toradol, can I take a water pill?

Question unclear: Toradol is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory pain reliever. Taking a 'water pill' would likely have no effect on an allergic reaction.Anti-histamines like Benadryl (diphenhydramine) may help-but if the allergy is 'severe' you risk anaphylaxis w/asphyxiation or a Stevens-Johnson type reaction, among others. Seek medical attention IMMEDIATELY if you have taken Toradol & are swelling, having difficulty breathing, etc. ...Read more

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Episodes of tremors, numbness, foot drop, vision and balance problems in a 37 year-old woman.....?

Episodes of tremors, numbness, foot drop, vision and balance problems in a 37 year-old woman.....?

Consult doctor: You will need a complete exam with blood test and most likely MRI with and without contrast. You will need exam with neurologist and ophthalmologist too. Please see your doc ASAP. ...Read more

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Is these medicines effect diabetes in any way? (bisoprolol, furosemide, dronedaone, diován, spironolactone)

Is these medicines effect diabetes in any way? (bisoprolol, furosemide, dronedaone, diován, spironolactone)

Diabetes and meds: Adding spironolactone to a regimen that includes maximal ace inhibition improves renoprotection (r) in patients with diabetic nephropathy. Diovan (valsartan) is also a r agent as it lowers both blood pressure and protein in the urine of patients with diabetes. The other drugs have no r protect effect in diabetes, other than lowering blood pressure. Speak to your physician for more information in your case. ...Read more

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I am diagnosed with mild and pulmonic regurgitation, and it is benign, and yet my dr. Still prescribed me a medicine Lasix (furosemide) and clopidogrel. Why?

I am diagnosed with mild and pulmonic regurgitation, and it is benign, and yet my dr. Still prescribed me a medicine Lasix (furosemide) and clopidogrel. Why?

Other reasons: You must have swelling that is controlled by lasix (furosemide). Ask him he will tell you the exact reason. You must not shy away from asking why you are taking a certain medicines. Docs don't take it personal. ...Read more

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Is it blood pressure or the medicine that is causing excessive amounts of fluid on my legs? Currently taking carvedilol, clonidine, and furosemide.

Is it blood pressure or the medicine that is causing excessive amounts of fluid on my legs? Currently taking carvedilol, clonidine, and furosemide.

Could be: There are some blood pressure medicines like amlodipine that can cause leg swelling. The three you listed from my experience shouldn't do that. There's probably some other process that's causing that. ...Read more

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Is it blood pressure or the medicine that is causing excessive amounts of fluid on my legs? Currently taking carvedilol, clonidine, and furosemide.

Is it blood pressure or the medicine that is causing excessive amounts of fluid on my legs? Currently taking carvedilol, clonidine, and furosemide.

Both: The fluid may be a side effect of your heart working too hard to pump blood, which is hypertension, and the carvediol can also cause some swelling because it lowers your BP by dilating your arteries. The Furosemide is to help get rid of the fluid, no matter what the cause, so talk to your doctor, you may need a different dose. ...Read more

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How do I come off of Lasix (furosemide)?

How do I come off of Lasix (furosemide)?

Lasix (furosemide): The first step is to discuss coming off Lasix (furosemide) with your doctor. The next step is follow the course you and the doc have agreed on. ...Read more

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What are some good alternatives to furosemide?

What are some good alternatives to furosemide?

Diuretics: There are many different diuretics. Torsemide and Bumetanide are in the same class. Others include hydrochlorothiazide, indapamide, metolazone, . ... Choice of agent in part depends on reason to use diuretic treatment. ...Read more

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What could happen if I take 240mg of Lasix (furosemide) all at once?

What could happen if I take 240mg of Lasix (furosemide) all at once?

Lasix (furosemide): This is a large dose which we would use only in unusual circumstance. The effect would depend on the patient's physiology. In an otherwise normal patient a large diuresis could be expected and possibly side effects such as ringing in the ears or hearing loss. In someone for whom the dose was appropriate we'd expect less diuresis and perhaps less in side effects. The answer is not simple ...Read more

Dr. Tony Ho Dr. Ho
1 doctor agreed:
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Does Lasix (furosemide) causes hypernatremia?

Dr. Tony Ho Dr. Ho
1 doctor agreed:
Does Lasix (furosemide) causes hypernatremia?

Usually, no: Lasix (furosemide) causes sodium wasting, so it classically causes a hyponatremia. ...Read more

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Should nonpitting edema be treated with lasix (furosemide)?

Edema: We use furosemide (lasix)to treat excess fluid and increase the renal excretion of water/electrolyte. Sometimes nonpitting edema is still due to fluid overload and Lasix may be appropriate. The cause of the edema is the indicator for what treatment is needed. ...Read more

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Which is better: Lasix (furosemide) or spironolactone?

Which is better: Lasix (furosemide) or spironolactone?

Diuretics: Both are diuretics, but they work in very different ways. Lasix (furosemide) will cause the body to excrete potassium while spironolactone will cause the body to retain potassium. This is an important difference. These diuretics are sometimes given together, but they are not interchangeable. ...Read more

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Is it common to be prescribed adipex in conjunction with furosemide?

No: It's not a common combination although they have no known interaction. ...Read more

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Is it safe to take lasix (furosemide) while pregnant?

Usually: Lasix (furosemide) is not know to cause birth defects. However, it can cause low potassium levels and, sometimes, rapid loss of fluid through urination. If it is needed to control swelling, it needs to be monitored closely by a nephrologist. Blood tests to confirm the kidney status and potassium level need to be done frequently during the pregnancy. Avoid becoming dehydrated. ...Read more

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Why has my doctor reduced the strength of my furosemide?

Furosemide: There are lots of possibilities why a doctor might change a dosage strength. You provide no way to tell. Why don't you ask your doctor? ...Read more

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Does Lasix (furosemide) in breastmilk affect infant growth?

Does Lasix (furosemide) in breastmilk affect infant growth?

Maybe: Furosemide may decrease breast milk volume by causing dehydration in the mother, which could decrease infant growth. It is excreted into human milk and may inhibit lactation. There are no reports of adverse effects in nursing infants. The manufacturer recommends that caution be used when administering Furosemide to nursing women. ...Read more

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Can a patient with hepatic insufficiency use furosemide?

Yes.: Main contraindications against the use of Lasix (furosemide) are: Anuria, hypovolemia (dehydration), or hypersensitivity. ...Read more

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I have CHF. Should I take Lasix (furosemide) if I don't swell?

I have CHF. Should I take Lasix (furosemide) if I don't swell?

Ask provider: Furosemide is often a critical part of keeping a heart with CHF in balance. Without it, there may be swelling, and usually with it, more shortness of breath. Not all CHF patients need a diuretic however, and excessive use may lead to dehydration or even worsening renal function. This is a question best asked of the provider that follows the patient regularly. ...Read more

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Help! I have pain during renal scan with Lasix (furosemide) wash?

Help! I have pain during renal scan with Lasix (furosemide) wash?

Possible obstruction: I do not know findings of renal scan. Some people develop pain with diuresis from lasix (furosemide) because of sudden distension of collecting system. This may mean there is obstruction to collecting system or ueter and the sudden increased volume not handled well. Sometimes this occurs in obstructed kidneys following beer ingestion, another diuretic. Pain a lot of times when supine at night. ...Read more

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Could getting Lasix (furosemide) cause terrible leg and right side pain?

Could getting Lasix (furosemide) cause terrible leg and right side pain?

Muscle cramps: Overly aggressive use of Lasix (furosemide) can lead to muscle cramps (like a "charley-horse"). Is that what you're describing? If so, ask your doc about reducing the dose. ...Read more

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I took 80mg of Lasix (furosemide) and did not urinate, should I be concerned?

I took 80mg of Lasix (furosemide) and did not urinate, should I be concerned?

Maybe: What is your kidney function? The response of the kidney to lasix (furosemide) is complex and depends on getting lassie into your blood, then it is bound to albumin and delivered by a complex mechanism to the site where it works. Many factors affect the response of the kidney. You medications reflect you have PPH, and sounds like right side HF. You may not respond because your kidney is sensing pre-renal. ...Read more

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I have CHF what happens when Lasix (furosemide) no longer keeps the fluid off?

I have CHF what happens when Lasix (furosemide) no longer keeps the fluid off?

Several things: You may need to restrict your salt and fluid intake. You may need a higher dose of Lasix (furosemide) or change to another loop diuretic. You may need additional diuretics which are complementary to the lasix (furosemide). Sometimes lying down and resting after taking the Lasix (furosemide) helps mobilize the fluid. Please talk to your doctor about it. ...Read more

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I'm wondering why are my husband's feet still swollen when on lasix (furosemide)?

Depends: Depends on 1) what's causing the leg swelling - could be a heart problem, a kidney problem, a liver problem, or just sluggish leg veins, 2) if he's eating salt which makes the body retain water and interferes with the lasix, (furosemide) and 3) what's the dose of Lasix (furosemide) - the effective dose is 20 mg daily for some and 400 for others. Why not go along on the next doctor visit, so you can get more answers. ...Read more

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How much success have you seen for Pseudotumour Cerebri treated with Furosemide?

Sometimes helps: One of the first drugs generally tried is acetazolamide (Diamox) which may reduce the production of cerebrospinal fluid. Also, it has been shown to improve symptoms in 47 to 67 percent of patients. If acetazolamide alone isn't effective sometimes it's combined with furosemide (Lasix), a potent diuretic that decreases fluid retention by increasing urine output. ...Read more

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Why is furosemide called high ceiling diuretic? Why not just high efficiency diuretic?

High Ceiling Diureti: Increasing the dose above the threshold will ellicit a dose-dependant increase in diuresis until they reach maximum effectiveness. This is called the ceiling effect. So, if you go above the ceiling dose, no extra effect will be achieved. Compared to other diuretics Furosemide has high ceiling effect. ...Read more

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At age 88, what are risk of being on Lasix (furosemide) 40mg. Precribe by my cardiologist

Risk: Lasix (furosemide) is a diuretic (water pill), it may increase urination, you may lose potassium, may cause dehydration, mild renal abnormality etc..., but your doctor will monitor you for these possible secondary effects. ...Read more

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Why are my husband's feet still swollen whhile on lasix (furosemide)? It's been almost a week.

Edema: It is necessary to know the reason your husband's feet are swollen as well as the state of his heart and kidneys and venous system. The problem could be not enough dose of Lasix (furosemide) but there are many other possibilities. Should discuss with husband's doctor to get the full explanation of what's going on. ...Read more

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Is it possible for the use of hyperbaric chambers to replace diuretics like lasix (furosemide)?

Not really: Hyperbaric oxygen treatment actually puts stress on the heart by making it pump against higher pressure. By doing so, it can put patients with weak heart muscle into heart failure which will then require Lasix (furosemide) to treat it. This could happen during the treatment or immediately after. In my practice, we are very careful when treating patients with an EF less than 35% (a sign of a weak pump). ...Read more

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My normal 3yrs old 23kg child has eaten my heart baby's 5mg lasix (furosemide). Should I worry?

My normal 3yrs old 23kg child has eaten my heart baby's 5mg lasix (furosemide). Should I worry?

Lasix (furosemide): Your child may urinate a lot so look out for dehydration.You can give electrolye containg fluids if necessary. ...Read more

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I am taking 2 40mg furosemide pills a day but my feet still feel like they are going to explode. What else can I do?

Compression stocking: Try compression stockings to your knees, they are at every drug store and are relatively easy to wear and cheap. Hope that helps. ...Read more

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I take 60 mg of Furosemide every 3-4 days, what meq dose of pot chloride should I take with it? Have been taking 10MEQ ER Cap.

No specific dose: While furosemide (brand name Lasix) does cause you to lose potassium in your urine, not everyone who takes the medication has low potassium. It is best to talk to your doctor and get some blood tests done to see what your potassium is before starting supplementation. If you potassium is not low without the supplement, no need to add another pill to your daily routine. ...Read more

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Generally, if an elderly person has sodium level go from 142 to 150 mmo/L in 24 hrs should anything be done & what? Person on 120 mg furosemide BD

Generally, if an elderly person has sodium level go from 142 to 150 mmo/L in 24 hrs should anything be done & what? Person on 120 mg furosemide BD

Volume: The sodium level is a paradoxic gauge for your volume status. When the sodium level is up such as in your case, it means that your volume or fluid status is low, and you could be dehydrated. However, you have quite medical complexities, and you should discuss this further with your doctor and don't make any changes without your doctor's approval ok?! ...Read more

Dr. John Chiu
2,638 Doctors shared insights

Allergies (Definition)

Allergies occur when your immune system is triggered by envirionmental factors it should ignore--for example, pollen in the air, or dander on a cat or dog--and creates cells to fight against them. An allergic reaction typically causes itching, congestion, or drainage, and ...Read more


Dr. Heidi Fowler
208 Doctors shared insights

Lasix (Definition)

Lasix is a loop affecting water pill/diuretic which is a kind of water pill or diuretic (heart ...Read more