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Doctor insights on: Medicine For Aortic Insufficiency

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What would cause aortic insufficiency to get worse?

What would cause aortic insufficiency to get worse?

Natural history: Progression is part of he natural history. Uncontrolled high blood pressure can make it worse. An infection on the valve is a medical emergency. Serial echocardiograms are very important. Many patients may never require an intervention. ...Read more

Aorta (Definition)

The aorta is the largest artery in the body, leaving directly from the left ventricle of the heart to supply blood to the entire body. It is made of elastic tissue layers called "intima" and is subject to damage by high blood pressure, smoking, cholesterol, ...Read more


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What is the best method or detecting aortic insufficiency?

What is the best method or detecting aortic insufficiency?

Echo.: 2d echo can see the anatomy and function of the heart very well. It can measure the size of of the aortic valve and identify flow abnormalities with good accuracy. ...Read more

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Would echo scan show aortic insufficiency?

Would echo scan show aortic insufficiency?

Yes: An echocardiogram will usually show if you have significant aortic stenosis or insufficiency. ...Read more

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What is the life expectancy if aortic insufficiency?

Unknown: Life expectancy depends not just on the presence of a diagnosis but also on its severity, comorbidities, and its cause. If the aortic insufficiency is mild and there's no underlying cause (say inborn), chances are the expectancy is minimally decreased if any. Whereas in other cases such as valvular abnormalites as a result of infection or immune process or severe heart defect it may be worse. ...Read more

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Would aortic insufficiency be heard by stethescope if causing symptoms?

Would aortic insufficiency be heard by stethescope if causing symptoms?

Not necessarily: Ai is very difficult to hear. It requires a very quiet room, a high index of suspicion, a careful exam, and often one must ask the patient to sit up and lean forward. ...Read more

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What is the life expectancy for someone who has an aortic insufficiency?

Aortic insufficiency: Mild ai of minimal hemodynamic import can have a normal life span. Severe ai with grossly dilated left ventricle unable to have aortic valve replacement, will have more than 50% 3 yr. Mortality from heart failure onset. ...Read more

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Is aortic insufficiency a valve problem?

Is aortic insufficiency a valve problem?

Yes: Cause and severity dictate significance. Serial studies are important. Close follow up with your doctor mandatory for antibiotic and management recommendations. Some cases are relatively benign and may not require intervention ever, but each case needs to be sorted out. ...Read more

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Are there any new treatments for aortic insufficiency?

Not really: The only treatment for significant aortic insufficiency is aortic valve replacement. That said many patients do well and live long lives without surgery if the valve leakage is mild or moderate in degree. ...Read more

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Does anyone on here have aortic insufficiency leak?

Does anyone on here have aortic insufficiency leak?

Probably: Ao. Leak is aortic valve regurgitation. It is a common condition and can be mild to life threatening. However, if you are 34 yrs old and healthy, don't tire easily, have light headedednesss, weakness or an enlarged heart, it is very unlikely you have ao regurgitation. However, if you have any suspicion, it is imperative that you see your physician immediately. ...Read more

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Would tropinin and BNP be elevated in patients with aortic insufficiency and/or severe stenosis?

Would tropinin and BNP be elevated in patients with aortic insufficiency and/or severe stenosis?

Possible: Troponin elevation is indicative of myocardial tissue injury (in absence of other noncardiac causes e.g. kidney disease) which may result from valvular disease through decreased blood supply to the heart. BNP elevation ususlly indicates increased cardiac stress such as in heart failure (that can be from valvular disease). Significance of elevation of either should be correlated clinically. ...Read more

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Former elite marathon runner; Echocardiogram-EF-75% mild TR mild aortic insufficiency. Still run & do strength training. Expected findings for my age?

Former elite marathon runner; Echocardiogram-EF-75% mild TR mild aortic insufficiency. Still run & do strength training. Expected findings for my age?

Depends on: How mild is mild. It is abnormal, but it seems like a trivial abnormality, with a high normal ejection fraction and no functional limitation. But why did you get echo in the first place? Ask your cardiologist for specific opinion in your case. ...Read more

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Had doppler echocardiogram. Report says "mild aortic insufficiency andtrace tricuspid insufficiency". Doc says this is normal findings. Any worries?

Probably: For a woman of 49 years old, your results are probably not "clinically" significant. This means that although your results are not entirely normal, they (the mild aortic and trace tricuspid insufficiency) do not contribute to any of your symptoms in a significant way. ...Read more

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Is aortic regurgitation hereditary?

Might be: Depending upon the cause of the aortic regurgitation (and there are many), the presence of a bicuspid aortic valve, as an example, may be hereditary. ...Read more

Dr. Yu Sun Dr. Sun
2 doctors agreed:
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What sort of problem is aortic regurgitation?

Dr. Yu Sun Dr. Sun
2 doctors agreed:

Valve disease: A herited or acquried valve disease, a variety of methods to treat aortic regurgitation and to replace aorticvalves have already been successfully employed in patients. ...Read more

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What puts someone at risk for aortic regurgitation?

Many causes: Acute: blood infection leading to valve infection (endocarditis), trauma, a tear in the aorta (dissection), marfan's syndrome. Chronic: high blood pressure/aneurysm, congenital bicuspid valve, syphilis, behcet's, takayasu, and reiter syndrome, ankylosing spondylitis, rheumatoid arthritis and idiopathic (cause unknown) - this is a board question! ...Read more

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How come I have aortic regurgitation, but nobody else in the family has it?

Many causes: Aortic regurgitation may be due to diseases with a familial distribution but there are many causes : congenital bicuspid aortic valve, long standing high blood pressure, marfan's syndrome, ankylosing spondylitis, behcet's disease, reiter's syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis - just to name a few. ...Read more

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Is aortic regurgitation progressive?

Generally yes.: This is usually a condition which will become worse over time. ...Read more

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When does aortic regurgitation progress?

Slowly unless..: Depending on the cause, it may progress quite slowly unless there is further unjury to the valve from inflammation, infection, or uncontrolled hypertension. If it is already severe, the main concern is to determine when the valve leak is putting to much strain on the heart and your doc has to monitor that. ...Read more

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What can cause severe aortic regurgitation?

Many: Acute valvular bacterial or fungal endocarditis, trauma, acute aortic dissection, sinus of valsalva aneurysm, acute deceleration compressive aortic valve injury, trauma, to include some. ...Read more

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What do you recommend for aortic regurgitation?

What do you recommend for aortic regurgitation?

Long course: If the ar is acute (eg due to infection or trauma), the problem is urgent. Otherwise, there is a period of many decades in which it should be monitored. Mild ar may never cause symptoms or require treatment. Serial echocardiograms done over the years will determine if the ar is leading to harm. Treatment is replacement of the aortic valve. Amlodipine may slow progression over the years. ...Read more

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What is the meaning of mild aortic regurgitation?

What is the meaning of mild aortic regurgitation?

Leakage: The aortic valve, when closed, prevents blood from rushing back into the left ventricle from which it has just been expelled by contraction of that chamber during systole. When there is some form of abnormality to the valve there may be leakage back into the left ventricle during diastole. Therefore, the blood is regurgitating back. ...Read more

Dr. Thomas Wright
58 Doctors shared insights

Aortic Regurgitation (Definition)

A reflux of blood through an incompetent aortic valve into the left ventricle ...Read more