Top
20
Doctor insights on: Mastitis In Older Women

Share
Dr. Greg Pahnke
92 Doctors shared insights

Tender Swollen Lump In Breast (Definition)

Breast Lump= a painful ...Read more


2

2
Is mastitis found only in women?

Is mastitis found only in women?

"yes": Most common post -partum but other times infection or inflammation can occur but always this has to be checked by a md for the rare possibility of inflammatory breast cancer
males they luck out again -- rare- I have only 2 in 3! years with cysts and infection -one due to trauma-- one with 2nd dcis. ...Read more

3

3
Is breastfeeding women to have recurring mastitis?

Is breastfeeding women to have recurring mastitis?

Possible: Mastitis or breast infection is common in women who breastfeed but can also happen in women who are not breastfeeding. If an infection has not been adequately treated, it is possible for it the recur, even years later. ...Read more

4

4
My 8 month old son was diagnosed with mastitis. How could he get this? Does this happen often?

My 8 month old son was diagnosed with mastitis. How could he get this? Does this happen often?

Not very often: Mastitis is inflammation and infection of the breast tissue.
Commonly happen from contamination from own skin, staph or strep are the most common bugs.
Its also associated with micro trauma or contusion/ compression of breast tissue plus blockage on the tiny pipes of the gland.
Sometimes required just warm compress and oral antibiotics.
Occasionally incision and drainage by the surgeon ...Read more

5

5
Is there any way to prevent recurring mastitis in a postpartum woman?

Is there any way to prevent recurring mastitis in a postpartum woman?

If Rx fails-surgery: We do everything not to operate especially in the post partum period but if long standing drainage-infection- drainage-- abscesses we will make a circumareolar incision and tie off the ducts under the nipple and remove all surrounding inflammatory tissue. ...Read more

6

6
Breastfeeding my three day old. My breasts are very full and she does not fully empty them. Is that okay or will I develop mastitis?

Breastfeeding my three day old. My breasts are very full and she does not fully empty them. Is that okay or will I develop mastitis?

Breast feeding?: There is one major cause and that would be how well she is latching. If she is not on so that most of the arola is covered and just on the nipple itself, she will not get the milk out as she needs and you will get very sore. If you are so full she can't latch, try expressing some milk in advance to soften the area to make it easier for her to get on well. Lactation consult is a great help too. ...Read more

8

8
What is mastitis, what causes it and can a 18 year old have it? I have inverted nipples and breast firmness

What is mastitis, what causes it and can a 18 year old have it? I have inverted nipples and breast firmness

Mastitis: Mastitis is inflammation of the breast glandular tissue. Most commonly it is seen in lactating women in whom due to inadequate milk evacuation and superimposing infection an inflammation develops. Otherwise, mastitis is not that common. Traumas to the nipples (piercing, excessive rubbing, etc.) may potentially predispose to mastitis but those are much less frequent than in cases of lactation. ...Read more

9

9
I’m 28, mastitis, got a fever of 38.7℃, penicillin skin test +, and my baby is 40 days old. What treatment should I take? Can I breastfeeding?

I’m 28, mastitis, got a fever of 38.7℃, penicillin skin test +, and my baby is 40 days old. What treatment should I take? Can I breastfeeding?

Need chk: Your mastitis should be treated with non penicillin antibiotics since you are allergic to penicillin
specially since you have a fever
if itinfection is one sided you can pump from that side and feed or for 2-3 days give formula ...Read more

10

10
My 3week old breastfed baby has green poop. I have been taking antibiotics for mastitis, could it be a reaction and should I stop taking them? Thanks

My 3week old breastfed baby has green poop. I have been taking antibiotics for mastitis, could it be a reaction and should I stop taking them? Thanks

Normal variation: The main agent adding color to the poo is the material made by the liver called bile. It starts out a dark green and goes thru the yellows to brown depending on the influences of various factors in the intestines. Rapid transit thru the system, as may occur with diarrhea or breast feeding may have a greenish yellow or yellow appearance. The slower, more likely browner. I'd ignore it. ...Read more

11

11
I have a bug bite like little red bump on my breast. It does not itch and feels like a blister to touch. I am currently breastfeeding my 3 month old. Not mastitis. Could it be inflammatory breast cancer?

I have a bug bite like little red bump on my breast. It does not itch and feels like a blister to touch. I am currently breastfeeding my 3 month old. Not mastitis. Could it be inflammatory breast cancer?

Need more detail...: The surest thing to do is have doctor review a detailed history and examine the concerned area as soon as possible as described in articles listed in http://formefirst. Com/onDealSickness. Html. By what you described, your worry for inflammatory breast cancer is premature and unnecessary. But if indeed related to a recent insect bite with no allergy, it should spontaneously resolve in 3-7 days.... ...Read more

12

12
What is mastitis?

What is mastitis?

Inflammation: Mastitis is an inflammation of the mammary (breast) glands. The breast can get hard, red, warm and tender. It often is caused by clogging of the beast ducts during nursing which can lead to a breast infection. Warm compresses, adjustment in nursing techniques and sometimes antibiotics are needed fer resolution. ...Read more

13

13
Is mastitis be harmful?

Possibly: If its not treated, it can be. If you are concerned for mastitis get seen, get treated. ...Read more

14

14
How can I cure mastitis?

How can I cure mastitis?

Medication: Treatment usually requires a 10-14 day course of antibiotics. Be sure to take it all, even if you feel better before the medication is gone. It is also important to rest, get plenty of fluids and nurse frequently. If your baby won't nurse on that side, then empty your breast manually. ...Read more

15

15
Can mastitis go untreated?

Can mastitis go untreated?

No: I can't imagine not treating mastitis... It makes you feel awful! Frequent breastfeeding and antibiotics can help you feel better. Feeling better helps you take care of baby better, and improves the odds that you will continue to breastfeed, which is so good for both you and baby! ...Read more

16

16
What are signs of mastitis?

Pain,: Redness, swelling, and possibly fever or other nonspecific systemic signs. ...Read more

17

17
Why do I keep getting mastitis?

Why do I keep getting mastitis?

Mastitis: There are several risk factors for mastitis. These include not emptying the breasts completely, clogged ducts, and cracked nipples. Also, not getting enough rest can be a big risk factor. ...Read more

18

18
How do I know if I have mastitis?

How do I know if I have mastitis?

Pain, hot, red, ill: The most common symptoms include pain or tenderness of the breast, redness of the skin- often in a wedge shaped pattern, warm feeling when touched, general feelings of illness and a fever. It typically happens in the first few weeks of nursing and is generally only on one side. See your doctor to confirm the diagnosis and get treatment. ...Read more

19

19
What are the symptoms of mastitis?

Breast infection: Mastitis is an infection in the tissue of the breast. It usually caused by a common bacteria (like staph or strep) found on skin. The bacteria enter through a break or crack in the skin, usually on the nipple. The infection takes place in the fatty tissue of the breast and causes swelling. This can feel like a hard, painful lump and may be red or warm. You may have a fever and flu like symptoms. ...Read more

20

20
How can I treat and cure my mastitis?

Fluids & Antibiotics: The mainstays of treatment for mastitis are rest, frequent warm compresses, increase in fluid intake (at least 8 glasses of water per day), frequent breastfeeding on affected side, and completing a course of antibiotic therapy. In addition, be vigilant about hand washing prior to nursing. Expressing milk frequently on the affected side is extremely important, and always complete antibiotic course. ...Read more