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Doctor insights on: Macrophage Activation Syndrome

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How is mast cell activation syndrome diagnostically differentiated from carcinoid syndrome?

How is mast cell activation syndrome diagnostically differentiated from carcinoid syndrome?

Totally different: The chemical mediators for these two conditions are totally different even though both can cause flushing. MCAS can be diagnosed by a blood test, carcinoid usually a urine test. ...Read more

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What is macrophage activation syndrome ?

What is macrophage activation syndrome ?

MAS.: Syndrome of uncontrolled proliferation and activation of macrophages and t lymphocytes, with marked increase in circulating cytokines (ifn-gamma, gm-cs). This is a serious disorder differentiated from flare of underlying disease by hypofibrinogenemia and therefore esr. Unknown cause, but associated with several juvenile rheumatic diseases such as still's disease and systemic lupus erythematosus. ...Read more

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What is nonclonal mast cell activation disorder?

What is nonclonal mast cell activation disorder?

Newly characterized: It's a mimic for disorders caused by a neoplastic clone of mast cells. This is hematology subspecialist stuff and i would much rather have this than one of the clonal forms. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23212667. ...Read more

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Which immune cells are most often attacked in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome?

Which immune cells are most often attacked in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome?

CD4 T helper cells: The cd4 t helper cells are reduced by HIV infection. The virus that causes aids also infects macrophage cells but the reduction in t helper cells is the most important indicator of HIV disease progression towards aids. ...Read more

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Muscle Biopsy Results Meaning? rare chronic inflammatory cells, composed of CD3/CD8 positive T-lymphocytes and CD68 positive macrophages.

Muscle Biopsy Results Meaning? rare chronic inflammatory
cells, composed of CD3/CD8 positive T-lymphocytes and CD68 positive macrophages.

All lab test need ..: With data we need clinical context. That is why you are having trouble. There is not enough information to provide an interpretation. ...Read more

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What is cellular immune deficiency syndrome like?

What is cellular immune deficiency syndrome like?

Severe infections: Such a term is not commonly used. Immune deficiency conditions may involved different components of the immune system. The cellular components are diverse and include lymphocytes, granulocytes and monocytes/macrophages. When deficient, severe infections occur, other problems such as cancers also occur in these conditions. A clinical immunologist/allergist should evaluate the immune system. ...Read more

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What is pigment dispersion syndrome (krukenberg's spindle)?

What is pigment dispersion syndrome (krukenberg's spindle)?

Glaucoma risk: Pigmentary dispersion is a syndrome where pigment is liberated from the back to the iris due to chaffing and is released into the aqueous humor. The pigment gradually obstructs the drainage apparatus of the eye and in about 30% of the time, may cause enough elevation in the eye pressure to cause glaucoma (pigmentary glaucoma). Its more common in younger myopic males. Treatment is available. ...Read more

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What does an increased number of mast cells in stress-indiced urticaria biopsy indicate? Previously diagnosed w/connective tissue autoimmune disease.

What does an increased number of mast cells in stress-indiced urticaria biopsy indicate? Previously diagnosed w/connective tissue autoimmune disease.

Histamine!: Mast cells contain histamine the chemical start in "immunology" parlance causes itching, leagage of fluid from blood vessels, even burning. This typical in an urticarial bx! ...Read more

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Is paraneoplastic syndrome genetic?

Is paraneoplastic syndrome genetic?

No: There is no genetic relationship to the development of a paraneoplastic syndrome. ...Read more

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Describe polyclonal and monoclonal antibody production?

Describe polyclonal and monoclonal antibody production?

Cells vs, animals: A monoclonal antibody is produced by in-vitro manipulation by expoanding a single cell making a desired antibody. Polyclonal antibodies are usually derived from immunizing an animal and colletcting its blood/serum containing the antibody. Polyclonal antibodies are a mixture of a large number of different cells. ...Read more

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What is a cellular immune deficiency syndrome?

What is a cellular immune deficiency syndrome?

Very ill: Patients (usually children) are very ill with frequent infections. Primary immunodeficiency (pi) causes children and adults to have infections that come back frequently or are unusually hard to cure. See 10 warning signs of primary immune deficiency http://www.Info4pi.Org/aboutpi/pdf/general10warningsignsfinal.Pdf. ...Read more

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What causes acute immune deficiency syndrome?

What causes acute immune deficiency syndrome?

HIV: I think you mean "acquired, " not "acute." the cause is HIV infection. ...Read more

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Which peripheral nerves are affected with guillain barre syndrome ?

Which peripheral nerves are affected with guillain barre syndrome ?

Affected nerves are:: Any peripheral sensory-motor branch of nerves that affect the anterior musculature of the leg and foot. Becuase gb causes upper motor nerve disruption of muscular function, the most affected nerves are those in the lower leg and foot that are part of the "swing" phase of gait, namely the extensor muscle of the foot and anterior tibialis muscle. The nerve roots affected are l3-l4-l5-s1. ...Read more

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Hypercellular Marrow,increased Trilineage Hematopoiesis,reactive lymphoplasmacytosis, Erythropoiesis normoblastic and decreased. Myeloblasts not increased Megakaryocytes increased, include young forms

Hypercellular Marrow,increased Trilineage Hematopoiesis,reactive lymphoplasmacytosis, Erythropoiesis normoblastic and decreased. Myeloblasts not increased Megakaryocytes increased, include young forms

Marrow confusion: Complex because the answer is dependent on the hematologists total examination and not just a marrow. There is a difference between dysmorphic cells and immature forms so no diagnosis can be made from your comments. Stick with the hematologist or concologist. ...Read more

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What is the difference between mast cell activation syndrome and mastocytosis?

What is the difference between mast cell activation syndrome and  mastocytosis?

Yes they Differ.: These are two separate conditions. Symptoms may be similar but the cause is different. In mastocytosis, patients have too many mast cells(MC). Because they are so plentiful, when one activates the other MC close by, will also release their chemicals (Histamine, Leukotrienes, prostaglandins, etc). MCAS is a condition that the numbers of MC are normal but overactive. Degranulating spontaneously. ...Read more

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Can systemic inflammatory response syndrome in a 5 year old with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis cause macrophage activation syndrome?

Can systemic inflammatory response syndrome  in a 5 year old with juvenile rheumatoid  arthritis cause macrophage activation  syndrome?

SIRS + JRA = MAS?: There is controversy as to whether macrophage activating syndrome is a real entity, versus it being confused for hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (hlh). Hlh has much more defined criteria and can make a patient very sick (and requires chemo for treatment). A question i would have is could a patient with jra who develops sirs really have hlh. I would consult peds hem/onc (rheum mds may disagree). ...Read more

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The antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is antibodies associated with what problem?

Miscarriage: Apa, along with lupus anti-coagulant antibody, are two antibodies that attack the areas in the cell wall of growing tissue, especially the fast-growing placental tissue of an early pregnancy. These are newly-discovered causes for recurrent miscarriage, and are usually treated with Heparin injections and Aspirin during pregnancy. ...Read more

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Can you have MCAS (Mast Cell Activation Syndrome) without an elevated tryptase level, even while symptomatic?

No: If you have symptoms and the tryptase is normal, it is highly unlikely to be from MCAS. However anaphylaxis to food is not always associated with elevated tryptase level. It would be helpful if you can provide us with a description on the types of symptoms you have been experiencing during the attack. ...Read more