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Doctor insights on: Lumbosacral Spondylosis

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Can someone with lumbosacral spondylosis get a disability?

Can someone with lumbosacral spondylosis get a disability?

I hope not: Arthritis is just wear and tear changes in a joint. Any joint. Every living mammal will have some form of arthritis from normal wear changes from living. If every one with arthritis were on disability, then 100% of folks would be disabled. Arthritis is not a disease. It is a normal part of living. ...Read more

Dr. Ihab Ibrahim
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Lumbar (Definition)

The lumbar part of the spine is the low back. It is made up of five bones (most of the time) stacked one on top of the other. They are connected by disks, facet joints, and ligaments. These soft parts allow for movement controlled by the spinal muscles; the muscles can also keep it stiff when need be. The lumbar spine also contains and protects nerves to ...Read more


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I been diagnosed with inflammatory Polyarthropaties and lumbosacral spondylosis what does this mean ?

I been diagnosed with inflammatory Polyarthropaties and lumbosacral spondylosis what does this mean ?

Polyarthropathy: Hard to say exactly since there are many inflammatory polyarthropathies and the prognosis and treatment varies depending upon which it is. Severity of disease can vary tremendously. Your rheumatologist can and probably should provide you with specific info about your disease ...Read more

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What is the difference between lumbar radiculopathy and lumbosacral spondylosis?

What is the difference between lumbar radiculopathy and lumbosacral spondylosis?

Nerve v degeneration: Lumbar radiculopathy a pain pattern due to nerve compression and spondylosus a term meaning degeneration of spine which can sometimes lead to a lumbar radiculopathy. ...Read more

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Oshould Narcotics be given for lumbosacral spondylosis without myelopathy n do u need surgery for it?

Oshould Narcotics be given for lumbosacral spondylosis without myelopathy n do u need surgery for it?

It depends: Lumbosacral spondylosis without myelopathy is a general diagnosis that covers a lot of different kinds and severity of complaints ranging from mild low back pain to severe back and leg pain with neurologic abnormalities like weakness, numbness and tingling. Severe symptoms may sometimes be treated with narcotics or sometimes even with surgery, depending on the history, physical exam, and tests. ...Read more

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Lumbosacral spondylosis with disc degeneration, mild posterior disc bulge at l3-4level indenting thecal sac, lateral canals & neural foraminae, treatment?

Lumbosacral spondylosis with disc degeneration, mild posterior disc bulge at l3-4level indenting thecal sac, lateral canals & neural foraminae, treatment?

DDD=arthritis: Arthritis/spondylosis of the disc is ddd. Like wrinkles of skin, ddd happens to everyone to some degree. It starts to be evident on MRI late teens and early 20's, progressing with age. Ddd/arthritis does not = pain. So don't let the diagnosis bother you. Treatment is specific to the pain. If back pain, nonsurgical. Nsaids/tylenol, pt/core strength. For sciatica, above plus nerve root injections. ...Read more

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I have lumbosacral spondylosis without myelopathy, spinal stenosis other than cervical, lumbar region with neurogenic claudication and thoracic radiculitis. What should I do?

I have lumbosacral spondylosis without myelopathy, spinal stenosis other than cervical, lumbar region with neurogenic claudication and thoracic radiculitis. What should I do?

Exercizes: There are two therapies for neurogenic claudication. Many patients who religiously perform the daily stretching and back strenghthening exercizes, get relief. For those who don't decompressive surgery can improve quality of life. Good luck. ...Read more

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I was already diagnosed cervical spondylosis and radiculitis, lumbosacral radiculitis, and ljd what are my outcomes for the futu more information on my cervical spondylosis::::will cervical spondylosis and radiculitis, lumbosacral radiculitis, and lumbar

Hi, sorry : Hi, sorry to hear about your problems. First of all, try not to worry. Yes, paralysis is possible with cervical spondylolysis, but it is rare and usually does not occur overnight. Having said that, it is difficult to advise based on the histroy alone. Physical examination and MRI report would be needed to get a better picture of your problem. The pain does not always correlate with the findings. In other words, many people have severe pain and little pathology or a lot of pathology and mild pain. It sounds like your pain is not acute but rather chronic. Medications do tend to stop working over time and sometimes they need to be changed or replaced by others to control pain. Increased pain alone does not indicate that something terrible is going on. Watch for weakness in the arms or legs, changes in your bowel/bladder function, and , if you need to, get a second opinion. Good luck. ...Read more