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Doctor insights on: Lumbosacral Plexus

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Cervical spine compression of nerve?

Cervical spine compression of nerve?

Radiculopathy: Typically you will feel referred, burning, radicular pain in a dermatomal distribution, depending upon which nerve root is being compressed. ...Read more

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Dr. Jeffrey Stevens
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Lumbar (Definition)

Refers to something related to the area about the lower part of the ...Read more


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Are brachial plexus injuries hereditary?

Are brachial plexus injuries hereditary?

No: The cervical plexus can be stretched during delivery.After the head is out, it is pulled forward & angled up or down to get the shoulders & rest of baby out.If the plexus responds with swelling around the nerves, transient loss of function(dys/wks) may be found.If the nerves are damaged by the stretch, nerves may be permanently damaged.This is birth trauma any kid could get.It is not hereditary. ...Read more

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What is brachial plexus injury?

What is brachial plexus injury?

Nerve damage: The brachial plexus is a complex of nerves arising from the neck and innervating the upper back, and arm. This can be injured by puncture wounds, direct trauma or falling asleep when intoxicated with the arm over the edge of a chair. Many important functions are served by this set of nerves. If you have concerns about this, see your doctor for evaluation and treatment if possible. ...Read more

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Where is your brachial plexus nerve?

Not single nerve: Brachial plexus is a group/cluster of nerves connecting cervical spinal cord and an arm. The major nerves involved include median, ulnar, and radial, but also axillary and supra scapular. The bulk of the plexus itself in located in the shoulder region. ...Read more

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Could a dilated batson's plexus compress against nerves in the lumbar spine?

Could a dilated batson's plexus compress against nerves in the lumbar spine?

Unlikely: Batson's plexus is the name for the veins that surround the vertebral bodies. Veins are very compressible so they are unlikely to cause any pressure on nerves. ...Read more

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Could a dilated batson's plexus compress against nerves in the lumbar spine?

Not typically: The batson's plexus significance is that it's a network of veins without valves. Typically veins have valves, due to the low pressure in the venous system, to decrease the chance of flow backup within the system. The batson's plexus connects the deep pelvic veins & thoracic veins, & with no valves can easily serve as conduit for infection/cancer cells to travel from pelvic structures to the spine. ...Read more

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Mrireport l4l5disc bulge bilatral lumberlordosis lost spondylosis deformanswithdddwith cauda equina compression and bilateral compresive radiculopathy?

Mrireport l4l5disc bulge bilatral lumberlordosis lost spondylosis deformanswithdddwith cauda equina compression and bilateral compresive radiculopathy?

MRI report: This means you have some spinal arthritis with some nerve compression (lateral compression) and some central compression of the caudal equine (where other defending nerves travel). There is also loss of the normal lumbar lordosis curve which may signify back spasm. This can only be interpreted based on your symptoms and neurological exam. Hope this helps! ...Read more

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enhanced posterior clivus likely venous plexus.

 enhanced posterior clivus likely venous plexus.

Probably normal: Limited information here, am assuming this is a MRI finding. Venous plexus in this location is normal. If this is simply an incidental finding, probably no follow up necessary, or possibly an additional study or follow up MRI in a short time if there is some uncertainty. As always, speak with your clinician regarding appropriate course of action. ...Read more

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Difference between herniated discs, nerve compression, radiculopathy, sciatica, spinal stenosis, spondylosis and osteoarthritis. I get various diagnosis?

Difference between herniated discs, nerve compression, radiculopathy, sciatica, spinal stenosis, spondylosis and osteoarthritis. I get various diagnosis?

It may be that you : Have them all as everyone ages so by 49 as a male, there are degenerative or arthritis changes in the spine termed spondylosis. By age 60, 20% have some narrowing or stenosis of the spinal canal. Disc herniation can lead to it too all resulting in nerve compression which can cause arm/leg symptoms termed a radiculopathy or in leg also known as a sciatica. ...Read more

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Confirmed first rib injury with brachial plexus involvement. Nerve root C5 and C6 injured at brachial plexus near first rib. Chances of healing?

Confirmed first rib injury with brachial plexus involvement.  Nerve root C5 and C6 injured at brachial plexus near first rib.  Chances of healing?

Brachial plexus : Depends on the length of time since the injury and the extent of the injury. If it involves the insulation of the nerves (myelin) recovery is 3 weeks to 3 months if no further injury. If the wires themselves (axons) are injured it depends on how bad they are injured. Can take 6-12 months if not injured past point of ability to repair. ...Read more

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Could massage help a brachial plexus injury?

Could massage help a brachial plexus injury?

Possibly: But the results will be short-lived. However if you have scar tissue developing there, maybe scar mobilization exercises might help. Suggest seeing a sports medicine trained Physical Medicine & Rehab Doctor that can help you with your recovery from this. ...Read more

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Can thoracic outlet syndrome or any other brachial plexus issues cause scapular instability/winging?

Can thoracic outlet syndrome or any other brachial plexus issues cause scapular instability/winging?

Winged Scapula: A "winged scapula" is a result of injury to the long thoracic nerve which innervates the serratus anterior muscle. The long thoracic nerve is made up of portions of the brachial plexus, namely cervical roots 5, 6, 7, so in theory, a brachial plexus injury can cause a winged scapula but it is unlikely to be in isolation of other nerve problems. Winged scapula is not typical in thoracic outlet. ...Read more

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Hi,,impressions show compression of L5 nerve root spinalcanal narrowing bilateral neural foraminal narrowing at L4 l5.diffuse posterior disc bulge at?

Hi,,impressions show compression of L5 nerve root spinalcanal narrowing bilateral neural foraminal narrowing at L4 l5.diffuse posterior disc bulge at?

Sounds like a fairly: Typical read for a male over 50 years old. Many findings are normal for age and sex as described here. They may not be related to symptoms or may cause symptoms. That is why a careful history and physical exam must be done in conjunction with imaging studies to fully assess the issues presented by the patient. ...Read more

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Please explain.Spinal stenosis and neural foraminal stenosis, inferior cervical spine due to posteriordisc osteophyten complex formation, uncovertebral?

Please explain.Spinal stenosis and neural foraminal stenosis, inferior cervical spine due to posteriordisc osteophyten complex  formation, uncovertebral?

Cervical narrowing: Age appropriate changes of a settling cervical spine causing bone spurs and crowding of nerves in neck may cause arm pain and numbess in fingers small and ring with or without neck pain. ...Read more

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What would cause cervical spondylosis, central canal stenosis, disc osteophyte complexes, mild cord impingement, cervical straightening in 43 y/o?

Age: These are all common findings that can be found on cervical MRI in patients over 40. Usually related to aging and the natural degenerative process. Genetics and lifestyle also contribute to these changes. ...Read more

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Is thoracic outlet syndrome and pinched nerves the same?

Is thoracic outlet syndrome and pinched nerves the same?

Related: The thoracic outlet contains both a collection of nerves like the brachial plexus and blood vessels serving the arms. Any compromise of the to can cause symptoms affecting both the nerves and circulation by compression of either or both causing similar sensations of cold, numbness and tingling. Simple exercises such as wall push-ups can sometimes yield some relief. See a physical therapist or dr. ...Read more

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Who reads the lumbosacral spine mri?

Who reads the lumbosacral spine mri?

Your radiologist: Your radiologist. Your orthopod (if you were referred and he ordered the study) will probably take a look as well, for any surgical planning, etc. But ultimately a radiologist will make the final read and is responsible for the findings. ...Read more