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Doctor insights on: Loose Joint Syndrome

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What is joint hypermobility syndrome?

What is  joint hypermobility syndrome?

Fingers bend back: Hypermobility is diagnosed when several joints extend ( move backwards ) more than they should, elbows small knucles and knees are common. It is not serious generally, and found in many gymnasts and indian rubber circus people. ...Read more

Dr. Stratos Christianakis
1,189 doctors shared insights

Joints (Definition)

Joints are parts of the body, formed by the cartilage-covered ends of bones plus the strong, flexible ligaments that attach the bones to one another. Movements at the joints in the body allow the different parts of the body to move in ...Read more


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What is joint hypermobility syndrome?

What is joint hypermobility syndrome?

Painful Joints: Joints that exceed their normal range of motion are "hypermobile". The condition is found mostly in women and has genetic relationships. There is an association of joint hypermobility and #fibromyalgia. Hypermobile joints potentiate people who have this condition to mechanical injury. ...Read more

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What is the difference between benign hyper mobile joint syndrome (dx'd by rheumy)and ehlers danlos . Have chronic joint/ muscle pain and fatigue. ?

What is the difference between benign hyper mobile joint syndrome (dx'd by rheumy)and ehlers danlos . Have chronic joint/ muscle pain and fatigue. ?

Opposite spectrum: A connective tissue disease or CTD is any disease that has the connective tissues of the body as a target of pathology. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS) is a severe type that has an actual series of gene mutations associated. It can be fatal. Hypermobile joint, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue, these are debilitating and chronic but not likely fatal or nearly as life concerning as EDS. ...Read more

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Is slipping rib syndrome related to hypermobility syndrome in any way?

Possibly: Slipping rib syndrome is also known as tietze's syndrome. As like any joint, if you have increased flexibility, your ribs can easily move in and out of place as well. ...Read more

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If have some acquired hypermobile joints w/o symptoms, can joints above or below loose joint become loose as well?

If have some acquired hypermobile joints w/o symptoms, can joints above or below loose joint become loose as well?

All of them: ? If have Hypermobility Syndrome can isolated joints be more or less loose than others. No, all body ligaments have similar degrees of genetically increased laxity; especially spine where all ligaments are physiologically similar. The entire musculoskeletal system is homogeniously rubbery; in keeping with each individual's unique Hypermobility trait penetrance. ...Read more

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Joint hypermobility cause of tendonitis?

Joint hypermobility cause of tendonitis?

Sometimes: One of the potential causes of tendonitis is overuse by the muscle/tendon unit trying to stabilize a hypermobile joint. This is certainly the case with the posterior tibial tendon in individuals with flexible flatfoot. However, not all tendinitis is related to joint hypermobility, so you would need to consult with your doctor to determine the cause of your tendinitis. ...Read more

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Just orthopedic or rheumatologist answer some hypermobile joints from ballet, gymnastics. Can these loose joints make the normal joints loose?

Just orthopedic or rheumatologist  answer some hypermobile joints from  ballet, gymnastics.  Can these loose joints make the normal joints loose?

Loose joints: Indirectly, you are putting additional stresses on muscles, tendons, ligaments, and joints above a loose joint. If well-trained, you can accommodate for these weaknesses. ...Read more

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What causes loose ligaments in ankle/foot?

What causes loose ligaments in ankle/foot?

Loose ligaments: This can either be a congenital issue or acquired after ligamenbt injury that did not properly heal. It is important to be evaluated by a podiatrist to see what would be appropriate to stabilize your foot/ankle to prevent injury and disability. ...Read more

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What is the difference between ehlers-danlos syndrome and joint hypermobility syndrome?

What is the difference between ehlers-danlos syndrome and joint hypermobility syndrome?

EDS-HT = JHS: EDS-hypermobility type (EDS-HT) is considered synonymous with JHS. Do not confuse these with other types of EDS as they have very different presentations including more involvement of skin, vascular structures, scleral fragility, or scoliosis. ...Read more

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Is there any pain relief from ehlers danlos syndrome hypermobility?

Is there any pain relief from ehlers danlos syndrome hypermobility?

Difficult problem: Because of vascular bleeding it is difficult to give you a definitive answer. You are better off going to a pain clinic preferably at a teaching hospital where they can taylor make a pain medicine cocktail for you, since they would have more experience with your type of problem. ...Read more

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Is joint cracking and popping a symptom of marfan's syndrome?

Is joint cracking and popping a symptom of marfan's syndrome?

Yes: People with marfan's can have joint cracking and popping, but joint popping and cracking is seen in many diseases and in many healthy people without joint disease. ...Read more

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Diagnosed with joint hypermobility syndrome, pain in joints including ribs hips knees sometimes excruciating. Constant fatigue, always cold, normal?

Diagnosed with joint hypermobility syndrome, pain in joints including ribs hips knees sometimes excruciating.  Constant fatigue,  always cold, normal?

Workup and PT: There is no good evidence that JHS in and of itself will cause such significant pain. With that said, many people with JHS do present with chronic pain, fibromyalgia, fatigue and even autonomic symptoms such as you're describing. Evaluation by a rheumatologist, neurologist and physiatrist could be helpful in sorting out your symptoms, ruling out other problems, and providing appropriate treatment. ...Read more

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Are joint hypermobility and tendonitis related?

Sort of: There is some evidence that those with hypermobilty are at increased risk of sprains and strains, although there also exists some evidence to the contrary. Pathophysiologically speaking, I am not aware of any studies implicating changes in the structure of tendons among individuals with hypermobility ...Read more

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Is having joint dislocation a muscle, bone, or joint disorder?

Is having joint dislocation a muscle, bone, or joint disorder?

Joint dislocation: A joint dislocation involves the joint, capsule, and possible boney fracture or avulsion. Depending upon displacement, nerve, muscle, and tendons may be involved as well. Check with your orthopedic surgeon. ...Read more

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What are the TMJ syndrome (temporomandibular joint disorder)?

What are the TMJ syndrome  (temporomandibular joint disorder)?

Jaw joint: Tmj stands for temporomandibular joint. It is the joint that connects the lower jaw to the base of the skull at two areas or joints. It sometimes refers to conditions that involve this anatomical area that today are referred to as tmd, temporomandibular disorders, a group of various conditions involving the breakdown of any, some or all of the differing components of the tmj. ...Read more

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How do you diagnose facet joint syndrome?

With difficulty: This is a diagnosis doctors disagree about. Mri and ct may show degeneration (aging, arthritis) of the small joints behind the disk and nerve channel. In some people this is painless. In some folks they may be a source of pain. Injection of medication (anesthetic or cortisone like) into the joint or around the small nerve supplying the joint is viewed by some as evidence of facet joint syndrome. ...Read more

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