Top 20 Doctor insights on: Lateral femoral condyle

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What is petellar tendon lateral femoral condyle friction syndrome and how is it treated?

What is petellar tendon lateral femoral condyle friction syndrome and how is it treated?

Hoffa's syndrome: Due to trauma or altered biomechanics or wear and tear inflammation, the anterior fat pad of your knee gets pinched between the femoral condyle and the kneecap. Treatment is usually conservative at first (rest, ice, nsaids, pt), but sometimes surgery is done when conservative treatment fails. ...Read more

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What is the typical recovery time from a trebecular fx of the lateral femoral condyle? Also what is the rehab period and what does it entail?

What is the typical recovery time from a trebecular fx of the lateral femoral condyle? Also what is the rehab period and what does it entail?

Recovery time varies: Recover time will vary depending on many factors including age, general health of the patient, infection control, smoker or not, blood sugar control, surgery or no surgery, the exact type of procedure, and post-operative and follow up care. Discuss it with your surgeon and get their opinion as to what they feel is a reasonable recovery time for you. ...Read more

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What does patellar tendon-lateral femoral condyle friction syndrome mean?

What does patellar tendon-lateral femoral condyle friction syndrome mean?

Friction: This refers to friction between your patellar tendon (the part just under your kneecap), and the end of your femur. Misalignment of the patella can be a cause, which is why physical therapy can be very effective, to restore better patellar tracking. Other treatment options include injections, nsaids (i.e. Ibuprofen, aleve), and surgery. ...Read more

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What does slight lateral positioning of the patella and shallow trochlear groove with min. Anterior lateral femoral condyle ridge reactive change mean?

What does slight lateral positioning of the patella and shallow trochlear groove with min. Anterior lateral femoral condyle ridge reactive change mean?

Common MRI: It means that your kneecap sits slightly off to the side on the end of the thigh bone (trochlea) @ 90degrees of bend. (flexion), and your 'groove' (trochlea) is slightly shallow on your femur. Very common radiologic ' diagnosis', seen most commonly in patients w/ 'mild' patellar instability or ' kneecap' pain. See your ORS for significance. Best of Luck! ...Read more

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My MRI results for left kneew reveals: mild thinning of the cartilage along the lateral femoral condyle with out full thickness defect or underlying reactive change. There is mild to moderate thinning of the medial compartment cartilage w/out full thickn

My MRI results for left kneew reveals: mild thinning of the cartilage along the lateral femoral condyle with out full thickness defect or underlying reactive change. There is mild to moderate thinning of the medial compartment cartilage w/out full thickn

You: You have several reasons for pain based on this report. Where is your pain? Along the inside, front, or back of the knee. Based on the fact that there is mild to moderate thinning of the articular (joint surface) cartilage in the medial (inside) compartment, I assume your partial menisectomy in 2000 was on the inside (medial) aspect of your knee. If that is the case, you have done very well for the past 12 years considering that you are a runner only to have mild thinning! Grading of arthritis in an MRI (where most likely you were laying down) is sometimes a little artificial so it is a little hard to tell how bad it really is. You definitely have thinnning, and it is probably a little more advanced in the medial (inside) compartment than for age, although basing this on a report is very subjective. The baker's cyst is located in the back of the knee, so if your pain is in the back, then this is the most likely the culprit. That being said, the baker cyst is a direct result of the joint being irritated, either from the medial meniscus tear or arthritis. Pain from the current meniscus tear should be along the inside of the knee, and it may be associated with instability, locking or catching. Based on this report, you should see a sports medicine professional to discuss your options. Good luck! . ...Read more

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Just had scope of knee and loose body removal. Note of lateral femoral condyle grade 4 chondromalacia on post op report. What is the next step?

Just had scope of knee and loose body removal. Note of lateral femoral condyle grade 4 chondromalacia on post op report. What is the next step?

Let me explain: When you have grade 4 chodromalacia, it is a bad sign that joint is going to cause more problems.
Several options
1-abrasion and microfracture surgery.
2-laser-assisted treatments.
3-autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis.
4-autologous chondrocyte implantation.
Good luck. ...Read more

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I am 60 years old and osteonecrosis of the knee the lateral femoral condyle been battling with pain is there any cure? With electrical stimulation

I am 60 years old and osteonecrosis of the knee the lateral femoral condyle been battling with pain is there any cure? With electrical stimulation

Yes according to: Mayo clinic, electrical stimulation. Electrical currents may encourage your body to grow new bone to replace the area damaged by avascular necrosis. Electrical stimulation can be used during surgery and applied directly to the damaged area. Or it can be administered through electrodes attached to your skin. ...Read more

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Hi Doctor. My MRI states that 'subacute pivot shift injury with oesteochondral injury to the lateral femoral condyle and likely full -thickness rupture of the proximal ACL'. Does this Mean I have torn my acl? Shouldn't the MRI states a full tear instead?

Hi Doctor. My MRI states that 'subacute pivot shift injury with oesteochondral injury to the lateral femoral condyle and likely full -thickness rupture of the proximal ACL'. Does this Mean I have torn my acl? Shouldn't the MRI states a full tear instead?

Rupture=tear: Yes, a full thickness rupture is the same as a complete tear of your ACL. If the MRI reading is correct, you have a tear of your ACL. While this is a significant injury to your knee, a surgical reconstruction will allow you to return to vigorous physical activity following a period of rehabilitation. ...Read more

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Grade 2 strain in medial colateral ligament and contusion in lateral femoral condyle of left knee. Treatment please. Is surgery needed? I am 26year ol

Grade 2 strain in medial colateral ligament and contusion in lateral femoral condyle of left knee. Treatment please. Is surgery needed? I am 26year ol

MCL: Fortunately most mcl injuries can heal without surgery. It does depend on where the tear is. The bone bruise should resolve over time as well but it takes 6-8 weeks to heal this injury. If your knee feels unstable or keeps giving out, then be sure to see your orthopedic surgeon. ...Read more

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I had chondroplasty of the medial femoral condyle and the lateral tibial plateau. What does this mean? I did a squat and think I tore my meniscus

I had chondroplasty of the medial femoral condyle and the lateral tibial plateau. What does this mean? I did a squat and think I tore my meniscus

See below: "Plasty" means to fix and "chondro" means cartilage. In a typical abrasion chondroplasty, the area of abnormal cartilage is blurred away down to a bleeding bone surface with the hopes that the subsequent vascular response will stimulate cartilage regrowth. Results are extremely varied. ...Read more

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Athroscopic debridement & menisectomy, partial medial & lateral. Grd1 oa changes lt medial femoral condyle, large posterior horn tear lateral meniscus?

Athroscopic debridement & menisectomy, partial medial & lateral. Grd1 oa changes lt medial femoral condyle, large posterior horn tear lateral meniscus?

Yikes: The wear on your lateral side and lateral meniscus tear is a not great. The lateral meniscus is responsible for balancing and distribution of force more so than the medial. Be very cautious returning to plant and pivot sports. ...Read more

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Treatment for knee hematoma and femur lateral condyle bruise with minimal effusion?

Treatment for knee hematoma and femur lateral condyle bruise with minimal effusion?

REST: Apply ice try and rest, it will take a little time for the bruised bone to improve. Hematoma may have to be drained. ...Read more

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Femur lateral condyle bruise after patellar dislocation. Can't bend leg past 45 degrees in supine position. But can bend it upto 100 while sitting? Why: (

Femur lateral condyle bruise after patellar dislocation. Can't bend leg past 45 degrees in supine position. But can bend it upto 100 while sitting? Why: (

MRI: Obtian and orhtopedic consultation: you may have scar tissue or debris form the injury in the joint, possibly fluid. Nonetheless, obtain an immediate orthopedic consultation. ...Read more

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27 year old female. Had lateral patellar dislocation in feb. My MRI shows bone bruise on lateral condyle of femur and minimal joint effusion. Treatment?

27 year old female. Had lateral patellar dislocation in feb. My MRI shows bone bruise on lateral condyle of femur and minimal joint effusion. Treatment?

Conservative: Treatment- nsaids, warms packs /ace wrap application, physical therapy, immobilization with a brace. The small fluid accumulation may resolve by itself otherwise it needs to be drained if it builds up. Follow up with ur orthopedic. Best wishes! Http://reference. Medscape. Com/article/90068-treatment#showall. ...Read more

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What is medial femoral condyle grade 2 changes around the medial side mean?

What is medial femoral condyle grade 2 changes around the medial side mean?

Mild cartilage wear: The medial femoral condyle is the inner (medial) side of your thigh bone (femur) at the knee joint surface. It is covered by articular cartilage that prevents bone on bone. Grade 2 changes means that there is some mild wear and cracks (fissures) of the cartilage instead of having a smooth cartilage surface. It is mild wear and tear. This is not arthritis and may or may not lead to arthritis. ...Read more

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Can you tell me about femoral condyle cartilage?

Joint padding: The cartilage is a slick rubbery substance that covers the bones that articulate so that one bone does not touch the other. It gives you cushioning and minimal friction to allow our joints to work effectively. You only get one layer so you must treat it right and avoid cartilage injuries. It demonstrates poor healing if damaged, and when it is wearing out, we call it arthritis. ...Read more

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What does grade 3 deep fibrillation on femoral condyle mean?

What does grade 3 deep fibrillation on femoral condyle mean?

Cartilage injury: Cartilage injury is graded 0 cto 4 based on the following findings (international cartilage
repair society)
grade 0: (normal) healthy cartilage
grade 1: the cartilage has a soft spot or blisters
grade 2: minor tears visible in the cartilage
grade 3: lesions have deep crevices (more than 50% of cartilage layer)
grade 4: the cartilage tear exposes the underlying (subchrondral) bone. ...Read more