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Doctor insights on: Lateral Circumflex Femoral Artery

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Dr. Marvin Ott
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Artery (Definition)

Arteries are defined as blood vessels which carry blood away from the heart (to either the body or lungs). Arteries: higher pressure, thicker walls, stretch (pulse) with each heart contraction & deliver blood to the arterioles which control the flow to individual capillaries. Veins are blood vessels which carry blood from capillaries back to the heart (body to right heart; ...Read more


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What would left anterior descending coronary artery blockage cause?

What would left anterior descending coronary artery blockage cause?

Left anterior descen: This has been called the "widow maker" artery that can cause angus, heart attack or myocardial infarction, or sudden death. ...Read more

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Femoral block complications. Can masses around the femoral nerve and femoral artery complicate femoral nerve blocks?

Femoral block complications.  Can masses around the femoral nerve 
and femoral artery complicate femoral 
nerve blocks?

Possibly: It can make performance of the block more difficult, ultrasound can help determine anatomy and if it is even possible to place the block. ...Read more

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Where is right subclavian artery?

Under collar bone: About 2/3 of the way from your breastbone to your shoulder. You can feel the pulse if you press hard. ...Read more

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Arteriosclerotic internal carotid & vertebro basilar arteries predominantly the left vertebrobasilar segment appearing tortuous with slight prominence?

Vertrebrobasilar: Were you started on full anticoagulation (warfarin/coumadin)? If so the bleeding gums could be secondary to therapy. The vertebrobasilar arterial blockage cannot be repaired surgically.You might be experiencing: dizziness, loss of balance, and incoordination. ...Read more

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MRI vertebrobasilar hypoplasia right side theres robust flow void anastomosing the basilar artery w cavernous portion of internal carotid artery/mean?

MRI vertebrobasilar hypoplasia right side theres robust flow void anastomosing the basilar artery w cavernous portion of internal carotid artery/mean?

Normal variant: The arteries at the base of the brain can course in several different patterns but ultimately get the job done, that is, supply brain tissue. Your pattern is like your fingerprint. Some more unusual patterns have an increased association with aneurysms, but this would have likely been described if present and vertebro basilar hypoplasia, as in the picture, is pretty common. ...Read more

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Angiography report of dad lm- nor lad- proximal seg 90% stenois lcx- distal diseased. Ostial total occlu. Rca- domi, prox total advice cabg?

Angiography report of dad
lm- nor
lad- proximal seg 90% stenois
lcx- distal  diseased. Ostial total occlu.
Rca- domi, prox total
        advice cabg?

Sounds reasonable: Obviously many factors need to be considered, but the anatomy you are describing would be difficult to approach with stents. Other factors such as age, frailty, and other medical conditions play a significant role as well. Each decision should be individualized based on his situation. ...Read more

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What happens if your posterior descending arterial branch of the right coronary artery diffuse proximal 60 to 80%?

Depends: Many people walk around with significant blockages without knowledge or harm. If the person described has angina or evidence of ischemia on testing, a percutaneous intervention should be considered. Otherwise, forget it - but treat the underlying arteriosclerosis: statin, aspirin, Mediterranean Diet, exercise, ideal body weight, no smoking, good BP control. ...Read more

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MRI =Mild" thickening of heart muscle not HOCM.Tortuous descending aorta. Aberrant right subclavian artery which courses posterior to the trachea. ??

MRI =Mild" thickening of heart muscle not HOCM.Tortuous descending aorta. Aberrant right subclavian artery which courses posterior to the trachea. ??

Mild thickening's OK: See my comment to your previous post regarding the other findings (tortuous aorta, subclavian artery). The mild thickening of the heart muscle is common, and not necessarily from HCM. It could be the effects of long-standing hypertension. Keeping ur BP low with a -pril or a -sartan (Enalapril, Valsartan, etc.) could even reverse the thickening of the heart. Thanks 4 ur question on HealthTap, & GL! ...Read more

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What causes an avulsion fracture of the left anterior superior iliac sartorius?

What causes an avulsion fracture of the left anterior superior iliac sartorius?

Sudden muscul force: The mechanism of injury in apophyseal avulsions is sudden forceful concentric or eccentric muscle contraction during running, jumping or kicking a ball, which results in traction on the unfused apophysis. Extreme passive stretching and chronic repetitive microtrauma have also been implicated in the development of apophyseal avulsion. ...Read more

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What is the ramus coronary artery?

What is the ramus coronary artery?

The third artery: Normally the main coronary blood vessel has two branches--the left anterior descending artery and left circumflex, but some people have a third branch termed intermediate artery or ramus-coronary artery--see picture. The incidence is some where between 10-30%. This can cause some confusion in ekg interpretation if this vessel is blocked/causing a heart attack. Consult doc. Good luck. ...Read more

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1. Ct scan shows 30% stenosis in the proximal vessel, 30-50% stenosis in the mid-vessel in left anterior descending artery. What procedure is needed?

1.  Ct scan shows 30% stenosis in the proximal vessel, 30-50% stenosis in the mid-vessel in left anterior descending artery. What procedure is needed?

Depends.: Depends upon symptoms and any preceding tests you may have done. If you have no symptoms I am not sure you need anything other than aggressive risk reduction. Possibly could have a chemical stress test done. Should consult with your cardiologist. ...Read more

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Athroscopic debridement & menisectomy, partial medial & lateral. Grd1 oa changes lt medial femoral condyle, large posterior horn tear lateral meniscus?

Athroscopic debridement & menisectomy, partial medial & lateral. Grd1 oa changes lt medial femoral condyle, large posterior horn tear lateral meniscus?

Yikes: The wear on your lateral side and lateral meniscus tear is a not great. The lateral meniscus is responsible for balancing and distribution of force more so than the medial. Be very cautious returning to plant and pivot sports. ...Read more

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What causes carotid artery stenosis?

What causes carotid artery stenosis?

Atherosclerosis: Usually it is the result of the build up of atherosclerotic plaques over time due to the buildup of cholesterol. ...Read more

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Is the posterior tibial or peroneal artery a superficial artery? Is there a superficial artery along the lateral aspect of the achilles?

Is the posterior tibial or peroneal artery a superficial artery? Is there a superficial artery along the lateral aspect of the achilles?

Arteries to the foot: The posterior tibial is rather situated medial and deep in the hindfoot, essentially supplying the plantar (bottom) of your foot. The dorsalis pedis supplies the top (dorsal) foot. The fibular (peroneal) artery provides blood to the leg's lateral compartment. ...Read more

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Is vertebral artery dissection curable?

Is vertebral artery dissection curable?

Generally not: The 2 vertebral arteries arise from the left and right subclavian arteries and supply the brainstem and cerebellum. Dissection is rare (2.5/100, 000), affect women to men 3:1 and can cause stroke in people head trauma, yoga, painting a ceiling. 50% have hbp. Treatment is supportive. Blood thinners are used if bleeding is ruled out. Surgery is not usually an option. ...Read more

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What's a coronary artery bypass graft for?

What's a coronary artery bypass graft for?

Rerouting of blood: A coronary artery bypass brings more blood to the heart muscle by connecting a new tube(vein or artery) past a blockage in an artery on the heart. ...Read more

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How deep is the femoral artery?

Varies: About ½ an inch but it depends on the overall size of the person. ...Read more

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How deep down is the femoral artery?

How deep down is the femoral artery?

Depends: Depending on your size and weight, about 1/2 inch. ...Read more

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How deep does the femoral artery lie?

Depends: Depends on how obese the patient is. In a patient with a normal weight for their height (bmi), the femoral artery usually lies about 2-3 cm beneath the skin. ...Read more

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What are types of femoral artery pain?

Neuralgia ?: Femoral artery pain may be mistaken for femoral neuralgia. But if you've undergone an angiogram, the femoral artery may be dissected or have developed a pseudoaneurysm or an av fistula between the femoral artery & vein. You should get an arterial duplex ultrasound of your specific groin to assess for flow abnormalities and/or a soft tissue defect such as a hematoma. Do you have any bruising? ...Read more

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What causes pain on or near the femoral artery?

What causes pain on or near the femoral artery?

inflammation?: Pain may be related to inflammation from recent procedures, scar tissue, or nerve irritation. A vascular surgeon can help you sort this out. ...Read more

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How deep is the femoral artery at its most superficial point?

How deep is the femoral artery at its most superficial point?

This is entirely: dependent on the thickness of the fat between the skin and the neuromuscular bundle. Obviously there is a dependance on age as well. A baby's artery will be much closer to the skin than a 400 pound man. ...Read more

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How deep would a cut have to be for it to sever the femoral artery?

How deep would a cut have to be for it to sever the femoral artery?

Depends: Depends on the size and weight of the person. I would say, on average, about 8-15 mm. Obese people: could be 40 mm. Very thin people, maybe only 5 mm. ...Read more

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Can i suffer an injury to their femoral artery and still lived a good life?

Can i suffer an injury to their femoral artery and still lived a good life?

Generally, yes.: An injury to the femoral artery implies a compromise in blood flow into the leg. In general this is only as significant as the symptoms you may have as a result of decreased blood flow (which may be none at all to severe debilitation) and a measure of the blood pressure in the leg, reported as the ankle-brachial index (abi). Discuss more with a board-certified vascular surgeon. ...Read more

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How difficult is it to open a new port in the femoral artery for an older weaker person?

How difficult is it to open a new port in the femoral artery for an older weaker person?

Depends: Femoral arteries can sometimes be "opened" with catheters (balloon, stent, atherectomy) and occasionally require surgery-- depending upon the extent and location of the blockage. Procedures may be performed on patients who are quite elderly very successfully. ...Read more

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Can you tell me in occlusion of the femoral artery at the level at which the profunda femoris is given off, arterial inflow to?

Calf and foot: When the femoral artery decides the profunda feed the muscles of the thigh and the superficial femoral feed the leg from the knee down. There are some connections between the two protecting the leg. ...Read more

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Bone punctured the femoral artery. How would surgeons fix this?

Bone punctured the femoral artery. How would surgeons fix this?

Vein or graft: We would directly repair this with a piece of vein or goretex, but for a bone to puncture the femoral artery is a horrific injury, and managing the vascular injury would have to be done in the context of how the patient is doing. ...Read more

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Can a femoral artery become infected?

Can a femoral artery become infected?

Yes: While a primary infection of the femoral artery is rare, if you have an operation or a procedure involving the femoral artery, you can develop an infection. ...Read more

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How deep under you skin is the femoral artery?

How deep under you skin is the femoral artery?

Depends: Depends on how obese the patient is. In a patient with a normal weight for their height (bmi), the femoral artery usually lies about 2-3 cm beneath the skin. ...Read more

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What are some symptoms of femoral artery stenosis?

What are some symptoms of femoral artery stenosis?

Claudication: Which means cram like pains in the calves with walking which gets better with rest and returns with walking. The distance of walking that brings out the pain is called the claudication distance. The shorter the distance the worse is the stenosis. Also, in severe cases the leg loses hair and becomes painful at rest with elevation better with dangling. ...Read more

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If your femoral artery is totally cut is it usually fatal?

Yes: You have very little time to control bleeding from a transected femoral artery before exsanguination. ...Read more

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If the femoral artery is cut will one become an amputee or die?

If the femoral artery is cut will one become an amputee or die?

Possibly: The femoral artery is the main conduit to the leg. If acutely cut and not controlled one can quickly bleed enough to die, yes. If it's tied off or acutely clotted it would kill the leg if unattended. Now, a tiny nick could stop with direct pressure but a cut or injury of any size ,at all, is a major injury. Good luck. ...Read more

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For a left sfa is it normal to enter through the right femoral artery?

Yes: A "contralateral" approach to the left sfa would start with an arteriotomy in the right common femoral artery. The left sfa can be entered from the left side through an 'antegrade" approach, and some physicians prefer this. ...Read more

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