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Doctor insights on: Kind Doctor Treats Fractures Cheek Bones

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What kind of a doctor treats fractures of the cheek bones?

What kind of a doctor treats fractures of the cheek bones?

Several types!: Three specialities predominantly treat these fractures. Plastic surgeons, ent, and oral surgery. It varies with the community and hospital and the interest of the physician. The most experienced physicians are usually associated with a level i or ii trauma center which sees a high volume of facial fractures. ...Read more

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Dr. Austina Cho
9 doctors shared insights

Fracture (Definition)

A fracture is a broken bone. As there is cartilage at the end of many bones at the joint, a fracture may also include a break in the cartilage. Fractures and broken bones are the same thing. It seems that many believe that a "fracture" is a lesser injury or an incomplete break in the bone, but this is not correct. Fractures may be displaced or ...Read more


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Does ENT doctor check up the fracture cheek bone?

Does ENT doctor check up the fracture cheek bone?

Maxilla fracture: This fracture may be evaluated by ent, plastic surgeon, or oral surgeon--make sure they have interest and experience in this. ...Read more

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What kind of doctor treats zygomatic arch bone deformations/fractures/dislocations?

Maxillofacial: The most thoroughly trained doctors for this would be plastic surgeons who have completed a Craniofacial Surgery fellowship or Oral Surgeons who go on to Maxillofacial surgery fellowships. Otolaryngologists may also have special training in this area. Good luck. ...Read more

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What type of doctor treats zygomatic arch bone deformations/fractures/dislocations?

What type of doctor treats zygomatic arch bone deformations/fractures/dislocations?

Zygoma: Cheek bone fracture tx depends on the extent of the fracture. If minor & with no dislocation, painkillers & soft diet is recommended. If displaced fracture, a surgeon does the wiring of the bone, which can be an ENT surgeon, a plastic surgeon or general surgeon. ...Read more

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Can a doctor tell if a person has had a sex change just by looking at them? Most people see a strong woman with high cheek bones and strong hands and they assume that that person has had a sex change why do certain women have high cheek bones and strong

Can a doctor tell if a person has had a  sex change just by looking at them? Most people see a strong woman with high cheek bones and strong hands and they assume that that person has had a sex change why do certain women have high cheek bones and strong

Hello : Hello in houston- you’re right, people do make assumptions, and they shouldn’t. Sometimes the woman with the big hands and roman nose is transgender, and sometimes she is…a genetic woman with big hands and a roman nose. And the short guy with small hands and delicate features usually is just a short guy with delicate features that he inherited from his short, delicate-featured parents. Why is it anyone else’s business, anyway? Why do you care what they think? There is a strong inherited (genetic, blood line, family) component to appearance. There is also a strong hormonal component. Picture twins, a boy and girl. Same age, similar genes, although not identical genes — identical twins are always he same sex. When the twins are young, if their hair and clothes are similar, it’s hard to tell which one is male and which one is female. Now imagine them at ages 10, 20, 30, up to age 80. They start to look more different from each other in their teens, and this becomes more and more apparent as they age, until about age 60, when they begin to look more alike again. What’s going on? It’s hormones. In their early teens, the boy’s testicles start producing testosterone and the girl’s ovaries make estrogen. The estrogen adds a layer of fat under the skin, making the girl’s facial features seem softer and the bones and veins in her hands and feet less visible. The boy’s testosterone has much more dramatic effects. Everyone knows that testosterone causes voice deepening and growth of facial and body hair. However, you might not know that testosterone also triggers the growth of facial cartilage. This is why, over the years, men develop larger chins, noses, and ears, and develop more prominent eyebrow ridges. If you think about the shape of a skull, you can see that most of the face is cartilage. The nose and ears have almost no structural bones at all. The hormonal effect on cartilage is what makes a man’s face look masculine. You can see from this why it is so much easier for transwomen to “pass” if they transition young, in their teens or twenties. Before age 30-35, there have usually been only mild testosterone effects on facial cartilage and appearance. When transwomen transition at older ages, especially after age 45, many cannot “pass” well without facial feminization surgery. In this type of plastic surgery, cartilage is removed from the brow ridge, nose, chin, and adam’s apple, resulting in a more feminine appearing face and neck. Because very few insurance plans cover any type of transgender surgery, many transwomen — if they can afford any surgery at all — have to choose between genital and facial surgery. The older a transwoman is, the likelier it is that facial surgery is more critical to her successful transition than genital surgery. Now the last part: why is it anyone else’s business, anyway? Why do you care what they think? Gender is the first thing most people feel they need to know when they encounter another person. If they are not certain of the other person’s gender, many people become anxious and agitated, and can become violent. That is why transpeople have to care if others notice, and what they may be thinking. If you are transgender, passing well is not just a matter of self-esteem; it’s also a safety issue. If you are not transgender, and you notice someone around you whom you think may be transgender or any sort of gender-different, keep an extra eye out for that person’s safety. Even if they are just a genetic woman with strong features or a man with small hands, those small differences can compromise their safety. Dr. Eva eva hersh is chief medical officer at chase brexton health services. Send your comments and questions to her by email at editor@ baltimoreoutloud.Com, or by surface mail to eva hersh md, chase brexton health services, 1001 cathedral st., baltimore, md 21201. ...Read more

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What kind of doctor should I see if i think i may have fractured a bone in my foot?

What kind of doctor should I see if i think i may have fractured a bone in my foot?

An Orthopod or a: Ankle/foot specialist. Generally these are undisplaced so a cast/splint maybe all you need, but if its displaced or gets so, then you might need it treated surgically. Good luck. ...Read more

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How does the doctor treat the broken bone?

How does the doctor treat the broken bone?

It depends: It depends on the type and location of the fracture. Fractures usually need to be immobilized with a splint, cast, or a brace depending on the location and type of injury. Some fractures may need to be surgically repaired. Have you physician determine which course of treatment is best for you. ...Read more

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How do doctors tell you to treat a broken bone after several weeks out of cast?

How do doctors tell you to treat a broken bone after several weeks out of cast?

It depends: Generally with progressive stretch, strengthening, range of motion, to work on soft tissue strength and flexibility. ...Read more

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Two plates have been installed in both the forearm bone to treat the fracture. When will my forearm regain full mobility, doctor denying physiotherapy?

Need more details: A lot will depend what else was injured besides the bone i.E muscles, tendons, ligaments. Also a lot will depend on the exact type of fracture, how old you are, and how motivated you are among other things. Therapy is a key part of many orthopedic recoveries so if you don't feel you are making adequate progress you should speak to your doctor again. Best of luck. ...Read more

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Bone (Definition)

Bone is a living growing tissue made mostly of collagen (protein that provides soft framework) & the mineral calcium phosphate that adds strength & hardens the framework. Two types of bone are found in the body; cortical (dense compact outer layer) & trabecular (makes up inner layer, ...Read more