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Doctor insights on: Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy Prognosis

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What is juvenile myoclonic epilepsy?

What is juvenile myoclonic epilepsy?

A form of epilepsy..: Usually seen in adolescents - described as involuntary spasms (or jerking) of an upper extremity (such as flinging a comb or a toothbrush) which may, about 1/4 of the time, also demonstrate generalized seizures later in life. Most do not, however. Usually worse in kids that are overly fatigued (e.g. Staying up late/poor sleep) and can sometimes be attributed to "typical teen behavior". ...Read more

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Dr. Justin ORourke
15 doctors shared insights

Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy (Definition)

Best described by janz in young women. Often with early morning muscle jerks and spasms but can also have associated convulsions. Fairly common and often develops during adolescence. Can be outgrown, but often continues as a primary generalized epilepsy. Eeg pattern very characteristic. Responds to specific medications especially depakote, zonegran, keppra, ? Vimpat, ...Read more


Dr. Que Chu Dr. Chu
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Hi,Is focal generalized epilepsy different to petit mal.

Dr. Que Chu Dr. Chu
3 doctors agreed:
Hi,Is focal generalized epilepsy different to petit mal.

It is different: Focal epilepsy (localization-related epilepsy) is due to focal brain pathology or part of genetic syndrome or unknown cause. Many types of focal epilepsy involving different parts of the brain.Onset in adolescent or adult. Petit mal (childhood absence epilepsy) happened mostly in school age children with frequent episodes of profound impairment of consciousness or subtle changes. Consult neurology ...Read more

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Could juvenile myoclonic epilepsy symptoms worsen after your first grand mal seizure?

Could juvenile myoclonic epilepsy symptoms worsen after your first grand mal seizure?

Could : Most folks with jme respond well to modest doses of depakote, but a small percentage have difficult-to-control seizures. It might seem like it gets worse after the first convulsion simply because the convulsions don't come under control. ...Read more

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Is petit mal curable?

Is petit mal curable?

Absence seizures, : formerly known as petit mal epilepsy, are more often found in children aged 4-14. They are usually able to be controlled, but not cured, by anti-seizure medications. Often an underlying cause is not found. Many children have a genetic predisposition, a family member with seizures. While some children develop other types of seizures, most outgrow absence seizures in adolescence. ...Read more

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Is monoclonal epilepsy, tonic clonic seizure, tonic seizure and clonic seizure are the same ( grand mal)?

Is monoclonal epilepsy, tonic clonic seizure, tonic seizure and clonic seizure are the same ( grand mal)?

No: Juvenile moloclonal epilepsy is a generalized epilepsy, which occurs in the age group from 12-16yo. Grand mal seizures are usually generalized type of seizures and has two phases. In the tonic phase, loss of conciousness occurs and muscle contraction causes the person to fall down. The clonic phase is the rhythmic contraction of muscles, alternating b/w flexion and relaxation. Thanks. ...Read more

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What is petit mal epilepsy?

What is petit mal epilepsy?

Petit mal: Petit mal (Fr. 'little illness) or absence seizures are forms which are characterized by a brief alteration of consciousness, and usually not followed by the post-ictal phase (sleepiness). It can appear as if the person is 'staring into space' and can be quite subtle. ...Read more

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What are tonic-clonic (grand mal) seizures?

What are tonic-clonic (grand mal) seizures?

Whole lotta shaking: As jerry lee lewis says. Grand mal seizures are the kind of seizure that most people think of: people pass out, and their muscles contract violently. It usually lasts less than 5 minutes. Sometimes people have only 1 seizure & never have it again. Sometimes people have more than 1 seizure & need to take medicine to prevent them. ...Read more

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Is generalized epilepsy a progressive, degenerative disorder?

Not progressive: Epilepsy is the term we use for recurrent seizures which are not caused by tumor or degenerative brain diseases. Although epilepsy may begin at any age, it usually does not worsen or cause increasing problems over time. However, a prolonged seizure can do permanent harm, so it is important to work closely with a neurologist to keep seizures well-controlled on meds which aren't causing side effects. ...Read more

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Is there a cure for juvenile myoclonic epilepsy?

Is there a cure for juvenile myoclonic epilepsy?

Gone with time: Most cases of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (jme) do have to remain on some medication for many years. There are some cases where they are able to discontinue medication within a couple years of treatment. This is not a cure, but is a condition of resolution of the condition with time. There is no specific treatment that is designed to cure. Medications help control as well as good health habits. ...Read more

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Is Generalized epilepsy hereditary?

Is Generalized epilepsy hereditary?

Some: there are many varieties of generalized seizrues. Some like Petit mal and febrile seizures have a high rate of familial occurrence. Others do not. The EEG pattern helps define the type of seizure which can clarify the issue. ...Read more

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Is generalized epilepsy progressive?

Is generalized epilepsy progressive?

No: Epilepsy is either without known cause or related to an identifiable cause. Unknown cause may present in childhood, be easy to control, and be genetic in type. Identifiable cause is often partial type seizures and more difficult to control with association with serious medical disease. Primary generalized is usually unknown cause. Secondary generalized is usually identifiable with bad outcome. ...Read more

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What is the difference between Epilepsy with Grand Mal Seizures on Awakening and Juveinile Myoclonic Epilepsy?

Different names for: These are different names for Seizures(doctors call it Epilepsy, if the condition is persistent). You should be checked by a neurologist, unless already done. ...Read more

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What is the treatment for juvenile myoclonic epilepsy?

Depends: Valproate is very good, but should not be used with teenage girls. Keppra (levetiracetam) has helpful as well as topamax and zonegran. Needs a thorough evaluation by a good pediatric neurologist who knows about the disorder. ...Read more

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Is nocturnal epilepsy hereditary?

Nocturnal epilepsy: Some are. Others are not. Most neurologists would be able to tell you if they feel that yours is genetic based. ...Read more

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Is epilepsy curable?

No: Only for the most severe cases is a surgical cure attempted. Some children outgrow seizures. ...Read more

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Autosomal dominant risk for nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy?

Autosomal dominant risk for nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy?

Nocturnal seizures: Adfle is an epileptic disorder that causes frequent, violent seizures during sleep. These seizures often involve complex motor movements. Vocalizations such as shouting, moaning or crying are also common. Adfle is often diagnosed as nightmares. Attacks often occur in clusters and typically begin in childhood. ...Read more

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What is juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma?

What is juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma?

Common brain tumor: This is a slow-growing brain tumor that often affects the lower brain of children. Each presents a difficult management problem, but the prognosis for a good long-term result is better than in other astrocytomas. ...Read more

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Is epilepsy inherited?

Is epilepsy inherited?

Occasionally: There are different forms of epilepsy. Usually, you don't see epilepsy in the offspring of epileptics, although, there exists an increased risk for those born of an epileptic. ...Read more

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What are myoclonic seizures?

Generalized Seizure: Myoclonic seizures are a type of generalized convulsive seizure characterized by brief, repetitive muscle contractions. (the prefix myo- means muscle.) they usually involve both sides of the cerebral cortex. ...Read more

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What is benign rolandic epilepsy?

What is benign rolandic epilepsy?

Common condition: About 1 percent of all children will have symptoms of benign focal seizures. The eeg will show focal polyphasic discharges in the central-temporal region of the brain, and the child is otherwise normal. Events often occur from sleep. Common age is from 5 years to 12 years. Most are outgrown. There are many names but very similar symptoms. ...Read more

Dr. Andrew Reeves
554 doctors shared insights

Epileptic Seizures (Definition)

Epileptic seizures. Per Mayo Clinic "Epilepsy is a central nervous system disorder (neurological disorder) in which nerve cell activity in the brain becomes disrupted, causing seizures or periods of unusual behavior, sensations and sometimes loss of ...Read more


Prognosis (Definition)

The prognosis is the predicted outcome or "forecast" for a disease or process. It is only an estimate but is likely based on past experience or data taking into account the individual's overall health status. It may suggest progression of disease ...Read more