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Doctor insights on: Jaundice Kidney Failure

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Is jaunduce in kidney failure a sign that the body is shutting down?

Is jaunduce in kidney failure a sign that the body is shutting down?

Means Liver Failure: Jaundice refers to the body becoming yellow in appearance because too much pigment from old red blood cells is not handled normally by the liver +/or bile duct. So it means there is too much destruction of blood cells, or a problem with the liver/bile duct. Jaundice may be separate from or connected with the kidney failure. If they are linked, it usually does mean that disease is far advanced. ...Read more

Jaundice (Definition)

Jaundice is the accumulation in the body of bilirubin. Normally it is excreted by the liver, via the bile. For a lot of different reasons, sometimes the bilirubin can accumulate. The most common reasons are a problem with the liver or the bile duct. This can make the skin and/or the whites of the eyes turn yellow. If this occurs, see your ...Read more


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Why does liver and kidney failure lead to eyes turning yellow and skin jaundiced?

Why does liver and kidney failure lead to eyes turning yellow and skin jaundiced?

Bilirubin: Bilirubin will accumulate because the liver cannot metabolize it and the kidneys cannot excrete the bilirubin, hence the yellow jaundice. ...Read more

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Kidney failure symptoms?

Kidney failure symptoms?

Uremia: If you have renal failure and is unable to excrete toxins and excess electrolytes/water from your body, you are likely to have symptoms and signs of uremia. They include nausea/vomiting, loss of appetite, inability to concentrate, diffuse itching, and lethargy in addition to having fluid retention. ...Read more

Dr. Tony Ho Dr. Ho
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Symptoms of kidney failure?

Dr. Tony Ho Dr. Ho
1 doctor agreed:
Symptoms of kidney failure?

Many: Fatigue, anemia, fluid retention, lower extremity swelling/edema, all the way to confusion, coma, or cardiac arrhythmias due to electrolyte imbalance. ...Read more

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Is kidney failure permanent?

Is kidney failure permanent?

Not always: Chronic kidney failure is generally irreversible whereas acute renal failure can sometimes be adequately treated and reversed, e.g., hemolytic-uremic syndrome. ...Read more

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Can you die of kidney failure?

Not neccesarily: Mild kidney failure does not. Severe kidney failure can be correctable also. Otherwise severe damage is treated with dialysis and transplantation. Chances of death increase with severity. ...Read more

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What the sing Of kidney failure?

What the sing Of kidney failure?

Often no early signs: The kidneys function is to excrete excess water, keep electrolytes like sodium and potassium in balance, stimulate red blood cell growth, and remove toxic byproducts from the body. Urine output may be increased or decreased, in which case there is often swelling of legs, and may cause some breathing issues. Lack of removal of wastes, causes nausea. See Kidney Failure: Signs, Symptoms, Causes & Stages - MedicineNet
www. Medicinenet. Com/kidney_failure/article. Htm ...Read more

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Is Kidney shrinkage kidney failure?

Is Kidney shrinkage kidney failure?

Not necessarily: The shrinking of the kidney can lead to decreased kidney function (kidney failure) but there are two kidneys and if one decreased function the other kidney will step up to the task. It needs to be clear why one kidney shrank. This is a guide to the diagnosis and the therapy. Some illness actually cause both kidney to shrink. Your function will help clarify your diagnosis. ...Read more

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What are symptoms of kidney failure?

What are symptoms of kidney failure?

Fatigue & swelling: Chronic kidney failure can sneak up on you but leads to anemia and poor energy. Build up of toxins makes you feel sick and look ill. Inadequate fluid excretion leads to swelling, high BP and difficulty breathing. Abnormal sleep pattern, metallic taste in the mouth are other symptoms. Most people feel better after a few dialysis sessions or a transplant. ...Read more

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How to know if I have kidney failure?

See a doctor: Hi LuYork1. "Kidney failure" can represent 1 of 2 conditions. Either immediate damage (acute kidney injury) or long term damage (chronic kidney disease). Both conditions may have associated symptoms, but often times patients do no experience symptoms at all. The only way to diagnose and manage suspected kidney diseases are with blood and urine tests, with the guidance of a physician. ...Read more

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How is kidney failure usually treated?

How is kidney failure usually treated?

Dialysis or transpla: If you mean complete shutdown of the kidney, then it would mean dialysis either through blood ie hemodialysis or through the stomach called peritoneal dialysis. If the loss of kidney function was gradual, your doctor could send you to get listed for a kidney transplant if your function is less than 20% or you could have a relative or friend donate a kidney. ...Read more

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What are the symptoms of kidney failure?

What are the symptoms of kidney failure?

Varies widely.: The symptoms & signs of kidney failure vary widely. It depends on the degree of kidney underfunction, the onset, the cause, & the duration. If gradual, there may be no initial symptoms. Sometimes there is blood in the urine & flank pain. Ultimately, hypertension, swelling & uremia results: anorexia, nausea, vomiting, pericarditis, peripheral neuropathy, and central nervous system abnormalities. ...Read more

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What are the symptoms of kidney failure?

Kidney failure: It depends on the severity of the kidney failure, but they range from fatigue and lack of energy, to high Blood Pressure, to welling of the face or extremities to being very pale (from anemia) to heart rhythm problems from imbalance in electrolytes. If you suspect you may have kidney failure, you should see a physician ...Read more

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What are the options for kidney failure?

For chronic failure: You may 1. Do nothing but longevity will be very short and quality of life poor 2. Do hemodialysis ie in-center machine dialysis via line or shunt 3. Do peritoneal dialysis ie home dialysis which is done by patient who is trained over a week period with family support 4. Transplant from a living related person 5. Transplant from cadavar (bank) 5. Transplant from unrelated person. ...Read more

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Does kidney failure happen to only adults?

Any one can: Any person can experience renal failure from a newborn infant to a geriatric person. ...Read more

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What plants cause kidney failure in humans?

What plants cause kidney failure in humans?

Examples: These include aristolochia, asarum (both cause chinese hern nephropathy), flavinoids, chapparal, etc. ...Read more

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Can you have beets if you are in kidney failure?

Can you have beets if you are in kidney failure?

Yes and no: In renal failure, you need to limit proteins, phosphorus, potassium and sodium. Since your kidneys are unable to clear these nutrients, you can have them but must limit the amounts. It is best to work with your nephrologist or a nutritionalist/dietician who can identify the foods that are high in these nutrients and they will be able to give you ideas of "how much" you can have. ...Read more

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Might someone have kidney failure and not know it?

Might someone have kidney failure and not know it?

Early yes, late, no: Early stages of kidney failure may go undetected unless a md is running certain lab values. Late stage kidney failure will generally have notable symptoms. ...Read more

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Are kidney failure and diabetes inheritable?

Genetics: Both are. Certain forms of kidney disease have characteristic forms of passing from one generation to the next. If you have a 1st degree relative who has diabetes, your risk goes up quite high. ...Read more

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What are the signs of stage 1 kidney failure?

What are the signs of stage 1 kidney failure?

No signs/symptoms: Check out http://www. Davita. Com/kidney-disease/overview/stages-of-kidney-disease/stage-1-of-chronic-kidney-disease/e/4745 & http://www. Mayoclinic. Org/diseases-conditions/kidney-disease/basics/definition/con-20026778 for more info. ...Read more

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Can e.Coli caused kidney failure if untreated?

Can e.Coli caused kidney failure if untreated?

E. coli: The so-called enterohemorrhagic e. Coli is linked to a particular form of kidney disease called hemolytic uremic syndrome. Type o157 is the most common but other o types can also cause this. Anti microbial agents not only do not prevent the kidney complication but clearly are linked to a higher risk of it.
However, e.Coli sepsis of other types can cause kidney failure that may be prevented by rx. ...Read more

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Which point would a diabetic have kidney failure?

Which point would a diabetic have kidney failure?

Diabetes and kidney: There are 6 stages of chronic kidney disease. Stage 6 is when patients need to start hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis to stay alive. Diabetics usually need to start dialysis when there glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is between 10-15 ml/min. Non-diabetics can usually wait until their GFR is 10 ml/min. Have the person you are talking about see a nephrologist for a more precise answer. ...Read more

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At what point would a diabetic have kidney failure?

At what point would a diabetic have kidney failure?

IF POORLY MANAGED: Most diabetics are caught on early with kidney problems due to microvascular complications and if managed well, can prevent or delay further deterioration of renal function. But poorly controlled diabetes and hypertension and host of other factors including renotoxic drugs can accelerate onto renal failure. ...Read more

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What foods are recommended for patients with kidney failure?

What foods are recommended for patients with kidney failure?

Food n renal failure: What are foods recommended for renal failure. Depends on stage and degrees of impaired function. So ask your own team. In general you want low protein, low sodium, possibly low K content. ...Read more

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How to treat kidney failure patients?

See a nephrologist.: Generally, good blood pressure control and avoidance of agents toxic to kidneys are mainstays of treatment, but certain kidney disorders require more specific therapies. A nephrologist can help advise you on specific treatments. ...Read more

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Is anemia linked to kidney failure?

Is anemia linked to kidney failure?

Yes: Kidney failure is often associated with anemia. The lack of erythropoietin, an essential hormone produced by the kidneys that enhances red cell production from bone marrow, would be the easiest explanation. ...Read more

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My mom died of kidney failure is that heridit?

Yes: Some kidney diseases are hereditary. However, diabetes and hypertension, the most common causes of kidney failure, are also very common in our society.
Ask your mother's physician if he can provide you with more details on the cause of her kidney failure. You can also see your pcp to be screened. ...Read more

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Will water therapy lead to kidney failure?

Will water therapy lead to kidney failure?

No: If by water therapy you mean excercise in the swimming pool, there is no risk for renal failure. As a matter of fact, this kind of therapy helps to increase urine output and decreases edema in patients who have leg swelling. ...Read more

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Could pyelonephritis cause acute kidney failure?

Could pyelonephritis cause acute kidney failure?

Yes: If your kidneys are already not working correctly or the infection goes for a long time untreated or both you can have acute renal failure. If you are concerned or believe you have problems with your kidneys, please see your doctor asap and have this investigated. ...Read more

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Does reflux nephropathy cause chronic kidney failure?

Yes, but...: Children born with severe degree of vesicoureteral reflux (vur) sustain kidney damage, namely reflux nephropathy. However, surgical correction of vur and adequate management of urinary tract infections may prevent further damage leading to renal failure. The notion that recurrent utis damage kidneys and result in kidney failure has been overblown. ...Read more

Dr. Robert Rahimi
377 Doctors shared insights

Jaundice (Definition)

Jaundice is the accumulation in the body of bilirubin. Normally it is excreted by the liver, via the bile. For a lot of different reasons, sometimes the bilirubin can accumulate. The most common reasons are a problem with the liver or the bile duct. This can make the skin and/or the whites of the eyes turn yellow. If this occurs, see your ...Read more


Kidney (Definition)

The kidneys are paired organs that lie on either side of the vertebral column. Part of their critical functions include the excretion of urine and removal of nitrogenous wastes products from the blood. They regulate acid-base, electrolyte, fluid balance and blood pressure. Through hormonal signals, the kidneys control the ...Read more