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Doctor insights on: Is Venous Stasis Considered Reversible

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Is venous stasis considered reversible?

Is venous stasis considered reversible?

Can control it but : Not cure it. As all of the others have said, chronic venous insufficiency (venous stasis) is very treatable but, true of all superficial venous insufficiency, it can't be cured. The manifestations of cvi can be greatly improved with treatment but, long term, your veins will need to be chronically managed with periodic checkups and treatment in order to maintain the best results possible. ...Read more

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Dr. Scott Bolhack
145 doctors shared insights

Venous Stasis (Definition)

Venous stasis is the backup of venous blood flow due to malfunctioning(refluxing) of the venous valves. These valves occur in the superficial , perforator and deep venous systems. When these valves malfunction, the back pressure builds up in the veins leading to venous hypertension and symptoms of leg heaviness, cramping or tiredness. Signs of venous stasis would be ...Read more


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Is venous stasis disease considered a disability?

Is venous stasis disease considered a disability?

Veonus Stasis: Venous stasis disease is a very common disorder. Most patients have mild disease that is easily controlled with compression stockings. Certainly, there are patients where the extent of disease is so severe that they can be considered disabled. ...Read more

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What is venous stasis?

What is venous stasis?

Valves malfunction.: Venous stasis is due to venous insufficiency which is a result of the valves in the venous system malfunctioning . This can be due to the valves in the deep system, superficial system or connecting system. Deep system valve malfunction could be due to prior clots, superficial problems could lead to varicose veins and perforator malfunction could lead to venous ulcers. ...Read more

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How do you treat venous stasis?

Get the blood moving: Venous stasis is sluggish flow due to venous insufficiency (valve damage) or calf muscle dysfunction due to bedrest, improper gait/footwear or injury. Ambulation with good calf muscle contraction, enhanced by compression stockings and correcting the vein problem (varicose vein disease/insufficiency) also helps. Those at risk for blood clots (heredity, surgery, malignancy) may need blood thinners. ...Read more

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What can I do for venous stasis pain?

Venous stasis pain: Lying down and putting your feet up higher than your heart helps. Compression is essential but you might need 30-40 mm hg stockings. The easiest way to do this is usually to wear prescription graduated compression stockings or circaids. If you can take anti-inflammatory medicine, that can help too. The best thing though is to see a vein specialist and treat your underlying venous insufficiency. ...Read more

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What is venous stasis; how does it occur?

Venous insufficiency: A better name for venous stasis is venous insufficiency. Stasis implies that blood isn't moving when, in fact, venous blood is moving--the wrong way. Normally venous valves direct blood flow up and out of the leg but when the valves stop working properly, blood flows backwards, pressure builds up and the pain and skin changes of "stasis" occur. More often than not, the cause is hereditary. ...Read more

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What can I do for pain of venous stasis ?

What can I do for  pain of venous stasis ?

Compression: The best way to deal with pain and aching often associated with venous stasis is to prevent it! compression stockings are the mainstay of therapy. Most commonly knee high garments with at least 20-30 mmhg compression. Weight loss, leg elevation, and excercise all have important roles. People that have symptoms despite conservative therapy may need other interventions. See a vascular specialist! ...Read more

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What can I do for the pain of my venous stasis?

Venous stasis pain: Lying down and putting your feet up higher than your heart helps. Compression is essential but you might need 30-40 mm hg stockings. The easiest way to do this is usually to wear prescription graduated compression stockings or circaids. If you can take anti-inflammatory medicine, that can help too. The best thing though is to see a vein specialist and treat your underlying venous insufficiency. ...Read more

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What can I do for the pain of my venous stasis ?

Get evaluated: Venous stasis can be from failure of the superficial veins ("varicose veins"), the deep veins (almost always after a dvt), or both. If the superficial system is involved then treatment can offer at least some symptom improvement. The first step is evaluation by a phlebologist, or an interventional radiologist or vascular surgeon who is committed to caring for vein disease. ...Read more

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Can venous stasis lead to decreased venous return?

Can venous stasis lead to decreased venous return?

Venous stasis: The issue is one of vein hypertension, due to the impeded flow of blood returning to the heart, especially in the legs. This is due to incompetent valves in the veins. With increased blood pooling in the legs comes 'heavier' legs, swelling, pain from swelling, pitting in the skin, leakage of fluid and blood into the tissues, leakage of the fluid onto the skin causing maceration and destruction... ...Read more

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