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Doctor insights on: Is Venous Stasis Considered Reversible

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Is venous stasis considered reversible?

Is venous stasis considered reversible?

Can control it but: Not cure it. As all of the others have said, chronic venous insufficiency (venous stasis) is very treatable but, true of all superficial venous insufficiency, it can't be cured. The manifestations of cvi can be greatly improved with treatment but, long term, your veins will need to be chronically managed with periodic checkups and treatment in order to maintain the best results possible. ...Read more

Dr. Scott Bolhack
154 Doctors shared insights

Venous Stasis (Definition)

Venous stasis is the backup of venous blood flow due to malfunctioning (refluxing) of the venous valves. These valves occur in the superficial, perforator and deep venous systems. When these valves malfunction, the back pressure builds up in the veins leading to venous hypertension and symptoms of leg heaviness, cramping or tiredness. Signs of venous stasis would be ...Read more


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Is venous stasis disease considered a disability?

Is venous stasis disease considered a disability?

Veonus Stasis: Venous stasis disease is a very common disorder. Most patients have mild disease that is easily controlled with compression stockings. Certainly, there are patients where the extent of disease is so severe that they can be considered disabled. ...Read more

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What is venous stasis?

What is venous stasis?

Valves malfunction.: Venous stasis is due to venous insufficiency which is a result of the valves in the venous system malfunctioning. This can be due to the valves in the deep system, superficial system or connecting system. Deep system valve malfunction could be due to prior clots, superficial problems could lead to varicose veins and perforator malfunction could lead to venous ulcers. ...Read more

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How do you treat venous stasis?

Get the blood moving: Venous stasis is sluggish flow due to venous insufficiency (valve damage) or calf muscle dysfunction due to bedrest, improper gait/footwear or injury.
Ambulation with good calf muscle contraction, enhanced by compression stockings and correcting the vein problem (varicose vein disease/insufficiency) also helps.
Those at risk for blood clots (heredity, surgery, malignancy) may need blood thinners. ...Read more

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What can I do for venous stasis pain?

What can I do for venous stasis pain?

Venous stasis pain: Lying down and putting your feet up higher than your heart helps. Compression is essential but you might need 30-40 mm hg stockings. The easiest way to do this is usually to wear prescription graduated compression stockings or circaids. If you can take anti-inflammatory medicine, that can help too. The best thing though is to see a vein specialist and treat your underlying venous insufficiency. ...Read more

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What is venous stasis; how does it occur?

Venous insufficiency: A better name for venous stasis is venous insufficiency. Stasis implies that blood isn't moving when, in fact, venous blood is moving--the wrong way. Normally venous valves direct blood flow up and out of the leg but when the valves stop working properly, blood flows backwards, pressure builds up and the pain and skin changes of "stasis" occur. More often than not, the cause is hereditary. ...Read more

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What can I do for pain of venous stasis?

What can I do for pain of venous stasis?

Compression: The best way to deal with pain and aching often associated with venous stasis is to prevent it! compression stockings are the mainstay of therapy. Most commonly knee high garments with at least 20-30 mmhg compression. Weight loss, leg elevation, and excercise all have important roles. People that have symptoms despite conservative therapy may need other interventions. See a vascular specialist! ...Read more

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What can I do for the pain of my venous stasis?

Venous stasis pain: Lying down and putting your feet up higher than your heart helps. Compression is essential but you might need 30-40 mm hg stockings. The easiest way to do this is usually to wear prescription graduated compression stockings or circaids. If you can take anti-inflammatory medicine, that can help too. The best thing though is to see a vein specialist and treat your underlying venous insufficiency. ...Read more

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What can I do for the pain of my venous stasis?

Get evaluated: Venous stasis can be from failure of the superficial veins ("varicose veins"), the deep veins (almost always after a dvt), or both. If the superficial system is involved then treatment can offer at least some symptom improvement.

The first step is evaluation by a phlebologist, or an interventional radiologist or vascular surgeon who is committed to caring for vein disease. ...Read more

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Can venous stasis lead to decreased venous return?

Can venous stasis lead to decreased venous return?

Venous stasis: The issue is one of vein hypertension, due to the impeded flow of blood returning to the heart, especially in the legs. This is due to incompetent valves in the veins. With increased blood pooling in the legs comes 'heavier' legs, swelling, pain from swelling, pitting in the skin, leakage of fluid and blood into the tissues, leakage of the fluid onto the skin causing maceration and destruction... ...Read more

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What are the symptoms the characterize venous stasis?

What are the symptoms the characterize venous stasis?

Venous stasis: The issue is one of vein hypertension, due to the impeded flow of blood returning to the heart, especially in the legs. This is due to incompetent valves in the veins. With increased blood pooling in the legs comes 'heavier' legs, swelling, pain from swelling, pitting in the skin, leakage of fluid and blood into the tissues, leakage of the fluid onto the skin causing maceration and destruction... ...Read more

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Has anyone ever heard of venous stasis, what I can do?

Has anyone ever heard of venous stasis, what I can do?

Venous stasis: Venous insufficiency can be controlled medically with compression and some simple preventive measures. Venous insufficiency, if deemed severe enough due to complications (like ulcerations), can be treated with surgery. Even with surgery, complete correction, from the pure sense of the word, is not the correct language. You would still have compression stockings recommended after the procedure. ...Read more

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What is the definition or description of: Venous stasis?

What is the definition or description of: Venous stasis?

Venous stasis.: Venous stasis is the backup of venous blood flow due to malfunctioning (refluxing) of the venous valves. These valves occur in the superficial, perforator and deep venous systems. When these valves malfunction, the back pressure builds up in the veins leading to venous hypertension and symptoms of leg heaviness, cramping or tiredness. Signs of venous stasis would be varicose veins and swelling. ...Read more

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Is venous stasis disease a disability; it is pretty hard to do anything?

Venous stasis disabi: The vast majority of patients with venous stasis are not disabled. You should see a clinician to assist you with the treatment which can include compression stockings and or surgical procedures. ...Read more

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Venous stasis, I have accidentally found a way to make this go away, is this worth anything?

Venous stasis, I have accidentally found a way to make this go away, is this worth anything?

If it works, yes!: Just elevating your legs periodically during the day can help. Support stockings can also be helpful. It is important to move your legs, get up and take walks, etc, and avoid sitting in one place or standing still for long periods. And try not to wear any clothing that constricts your abdomen. Finally, regular exercise and weight loss if you are overweight are helpful. ...Read more

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Are venous stasis and stasis dermatitis the same thing?

Are venous stasis and stasis dermatitis the same thing?

Venous insufficiency: Actually venous stasis and stasis dermatitis are misnomers. Venous stasis means that venous blood isn't moving and we now know that really doesn't happen. As dr. Bolhack said, the cause of the problem is venous hypertension which occurs because of venous insufficiency or reflux (blood flowing backwards), not stasis. Chronic venous insufficiency causes inflammation which causes dermatitis. ...Read more

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What can be done for venous stasis disease with lymphedema?

What can be done for venous stasis disease with lymphedema?

Valves malfunction.: Venous stasis with lymphedema is due to venous insufficiency which is a result of the valves in the venous system malfunctioning. This can be due to the valves in the deep system, superficial system or connecting system.
See a vein specialist for a full venous evaluation with a venous reflux exam. Initial treatment consists of support hose, lymphedema massage and compression pumps. ...Read more

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Is there any connection between venous stasis disease and lymphedema?

Is there any connection between venous stasis disease and lymphedema?

Phlebolymphedema: There is such a close connection between veins and lymphatic channels that many feel it is impossible to have venous insufficiency and not have the lymphatics be affected--at least a little--and probably vice versa. It is possible though to have lymphedema with essentially no venous insufficiency. It is also possible to have both, treat the veins, and have no effect on swelling. ...Read more

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I have been diagnosed with venous stasis. Are there natural treatments available?

I have been diagnosed with venous stasis. Are there natural treatments available?

Venous stasis: Venous stasis and the underlying cause of venous hypertension can be treated with compression. You should seek help from a clinician that is familiar with determining the correct compression for you. A wound care center and vascular surgeon that specializes in veins can help you. There are many choices for compression and it can take some time before the right level and comfort are attained. ...Read more

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How often do you need to go to the doctor to check on your venous stasis?

Regularly: If you have not had a full work-up to determine the cause of your venous stasis, then you should see a vein specialist asap, as there may be issues that can be improved or even cured to resolve the problem. If you are currently undergoing tratment and are stable, then you should be followed regularly, perhaps every 6-12 months for monitoring. Any sudden change should be evaluated immediately. ...Read more

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What is the difference between chronic venous stasis and chronic arterial insufficiency?

What is the difference between chronic venous stasis and chronic arterial insufficiency?

Significant: Chronic venous stasis (cvi) is a result of long standing venous insufficiency due to malfunctioning of the valves of either the superficial, deep or both systems of veins. Chronic arterial insufficiency is due to long standing decrease arterial blood flow into either the legs or arms. Venous problems cause leg swelling and discoloration while arterial problems cause pain and even gangrene. ...Read more

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I have edema and a venous stasis ulcer. Help please?

I have edema and a venous stasis ulcer. Help please?

Vein hypertension: You need an evaluation by a clinician that understands this disease process. Seek help from your internist, wound care physician, vascular surgeon etc. ...Read more

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What is the diagnosis code for open venous stasis ulcers?

What is the diagnosis code for open venous stasis ulcers?

Coding: Not sure why codes are important to you.
There are a group of codes that describe venous hypertension, with and without inflammation, and with and without ulceration.
There are another set of codes that describe ulcerations and these vary depending on the location along the lower extremity that they are found. ...Read more

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What are the differences between a venous stasis ulcer and an ischemic ulcer?

Ulcer artery vs vein: Venous ulcers are due to high blood pressure of the veins resulting in the leakage of fluid into the tissues of the legs. Compression of the lower extremities and surgery on the veins can correct this. Ischemic ulcers are due to problems with arteries. There are larger arteries and small microscopic ones and either or both can have blockages. They usually can be discerned from each other. ...Read more

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I have venous stasis ulcers. Which kind of physician should I see about this?

Treat the cause: Although a wound care center or a vein specialist can treat your ulcer, it is important to make sure that you treat the cause (venous insufficiency) of the ulcer. Treating your vein problem will help your ulcer heal more quickly and will also help to keep it from coming back once it is healed. ...Read more

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How do you stop a venous stasis ulcer from weeping?

How do you stop a venous stasis ulcer from weeping?

Compression: The most important treatment to a venous stasis ulcer is compression wrap or hose. The compression of the wrap must sufficient to counterbalance the underlying venous hypertension. The venous hypertension vhtn is the cause of the weeping and ulcer. Vhtn pressure is the result of gravity and faulty valves. Once proper compression is applied weeping and proper wound care is applied weeping will stop. ...Read more

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What does black tissue in a venous stasis ulcer mean?

Black in ulcer: 'black' tissue can be several things in an ulcer. It can represent decayed tissue, infected tissue, affects of silver based dressings, etc. Please go to a wound center to be seen. ...Read more

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I have venous stasis ulcers. Who has the best website for easy to understand information on this subject?

I have venous stasis ulcers. Who has the best website for easy to understand information on this subject?

Website for venous: I have not come across any sites that I would consider best. Use healthtap™ to ask any questions and review the comments by the physicians that post answers here using the key words: venous stasis, chronic venous insufficiency, veins, etc. ...Read more