Top
10
Doctor insights on: Is It Normal To Still Have Confusion After A Stroke

Share
1

1
Is it normal to still have confusion after a stroke?

Is it normal to still have confusion after a stroke?

Not sure: If there is new onset of stroke within few days, it is possible that this person may be confused. But with the couple of days after the stroke, it may or may not have ongoing confusion. The reason for that is that maybe this person might have heart attack, blood clot, more stroke, infections, swelling of brain, damage where the language is processing, medication induced or permanent brain damage. ...Read more

Dr. Carlos Satulovsky
806 doctors shared insights

Confusion (Definition)

Confusion = bewilderment. Term is ...Read more


2

2
Diagnosed with tonsillitis 2 days ago thinking I had a heat stroke. Confusion was a symptom. Feeling better but still confused. Is this my anxiety?

Diagnosed with tonsillitis 2 days ago thinking I had a heat stroke. Confusion was a symptom. Feeling better but still confused. Is this my anxiety?

Confusion: Is usually considered medically urgent, if not emergent. I’m not trying to be an alarmist, but I would encourage you to seek consultation in an ER or urgent care as soon as possible, given that I don’t have further information. Confusion after "heat stoke" and an infection warrants evaluation. ...Read more

3

3
EF is 48% without dilation and normal dimensions. Stroke volume low. How possible with normal structure? Recheck confirmed it. I'm 25, confused.

EF is 48% without dilation and normal dimensions. Stroke volume low. How possible with normal structure?  Recheck confirmed it. I'm 25, confused.

LVEF is 48% without dilation: Yes , the LVEF is diminished, normal is 55-70%. Did you drink in the past?, smoker?, what is your weight, and your height, have you had multiple viral infections, family history of heart failure ( mother, father, uncles, grand-parents, brothers etc), The condition is called "cardiomyopathy". The different types of the disease have different causes, signs and symptoms, and outcomes. Cardiomyopathy can be acquired or inherited. "Acquired" means you aren't born with the disease but you develop it due to another disease, condition, or factor. "Inherited" means your parents passed the gene for the disease on to you. In many cases, the cause of cardiomyopathy isn't known. Cardiomyopathy can affect people of all ages. However, certain age groups are more likely to have certain types of cardiomyopathy. This document focuses on cardiomyopathy in adults. Some people who have cardiomyopathy have no signs or symptoms and need no treatment. For other people, the disease develops rapidly, symptoms are severe, and serious complications occur. Treatments for cardiomyopathy include lifestyle changes, medicines, surgery, implanted devices to correct arrhythmias, and a nonsurgical procedure. These treatments can control symptoms, reduce complications, and stop the disease from getting worse. Dilated cardiomyopathy is the most common type of the disease. It mostly occurs in adults aged 20 to 60. Men are more likely than women to have this type of cardiomyopathy. Dilated cardiomyopathy affects the heart's ventricles and atria. These are the lower and upper chambers of the heart, respectively. The disease often starts in the left ventricle, the heart's main pumping chamber. The heart muscle begins to dilate (stretch and become thinner). This causes the inside of the chamber to enlarge. The problem often spreads to the right ventricle and then to the atria as the disease gets worse. When the chambers dilate, the heart muscle doesn't contract normally. Also, the heart can't pump blood very well. Over time, the heart becomes weaker and heart failure can occur. Symptoms of heart failure include fatigue (tiredness); swelling of the ankles, feet, legs, and abdomen; and shortness of breath. Dilated cardiomyopathy also can lead to heart valve problems, arrhythmias, and blood clots in the heart. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
7

7
Did I have a mini-stroke? I am confused and have difficulty solving easy problems.

Did I have a mini-stroke? I am confused and have difficulty solving easy problems.

Probably not: A 'mini stroke' is stroke symptoms that last less than 24 hours and then resolves. Also stroke symptoms usually have motor or sensation changes and one sided body symptoms. Many things can cause confusion and changes in mentation - you really should see your doctor for a workup. ...Read more

9

9
Confused; after an ischemic stroke, been prescribed 325 mg aspirin and plavix (clopidogrel). Research doesn't support this; doctor says it's okay. Pls advise.

Confused; after an ischemic stroke, been prescribed 325 mg aspirin and plavix (clopidogrel). Research doesn't support this; doctor says it's okay. Pls advise.

Stroke: The combination of Aspirin and Plavix (clopidogrel) has not been shown to offer any additional benefit in reducing the risk of stroke when compared to either one alone. The only gain is an increased risk of bleeding complications. Still, its combination can be used in recent coronary or other arterial stent placement and atrial fibrillation patients when anticoagulation is not a feasible option (anticoagulation is still preferred option in atrial fibrillation treatment). ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
10

10
My right eye is red and I have headache on the right side, feeling confused a lil bit ..Do I have a tumor or brain stroke?

My right eye is red and I have headache on the right side, feeling confused a lil bit ..Do I have a tumor or brain stroke?

Stroke and tumor are: Uncommon in young people. Infection of your eyes, inflammation of your optic nerve or arteries in your scalp/temple may cause your symptoms.If these symptoms are getting worse, go see your dr or go to the er asap. Hope u feel better! ...Read more