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Doctor insights on: Is It Normal For Babies To Have Bow Legs

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Is it normal for babies to have bow legs?

Is it normal for babies to have bow legs?

Yes: Most babies are born "bow-legged" because of their position in the womb. Babies who were in breech position for most of the pregnancy, tend to have straighter legs, but can have problems with their hips. Bow legs are usually not treated, and will straighten as the child walks. If a child becomes more bow legged as they grow, more investigation is required. ...Read more

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Dr. Anatoly Belilovsky
175 doctors shared insights

Bow Legs (Definition)

Bowed legs can occur as a familial history, no orthopedic issues or problems with walking, bearing weight. This also tends to straighten out in time as long bones ...Read more


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I have bow legs and my fibular sticks out a lot on the side of my leg. Is this normal and can I still squat heavy weights despite this?

I have bow legs and my fibular sticks out a lot on the side of my leg. Is this normal and can I still squat heavy weights despite this?

Probably: Hard to say for sure without knowing the severity of your bowleg issue. But you can do the weight lifting. If you start to have knee pain and problems then see an orthopedic doc. Don't squat excessive weight amounts. Hopefully you are being supervised by an athletic trainer. ...Read more

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Why does my baby have bow legs?

Why does my baby have bow legs?

Normal: All newborns have bowlegs-- that's the shape babies have to fit in the womb. They get less bowed as babies bear weight and walk. ...Read more

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Is it normal for a child to have bow legs.

Yes: Once pathological conditions such as blount's disease or rickets have been ruled out, some bowing of the legs is normal in toddlers. ...Read more

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How could a doctor fix a babies legs that are very badly bow legged?

How could a doctor fix a babies legs that are very badly bow legged?

They shouldn't: The vast majority of babies who have bowed legs are normal. Their knees will straighten out as they grow. However, babies should be evaluated by a physician. There are a small number of children who have growth or nutritional deficiencies that need to be treated with nutritional supplements or surgery. ...Read more

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Are bow legs permanent?

Are bow legs permanent?

Depends on your age: Bow legs and in-turning feet are common in toddlers, worst at about age 2. Then progression to knock-knees happens, worst about age 7. The average adult has a few (5-7) degrees of knock-knee. Milder persistent bow-legs are left alone. If you have bow-legs when you quit growing, the it is permanent, short of surgical correction. ...Read more

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Is bow legs hereditary?

Possible but....: There are many causes that should be investigated. An orthopaedic surgeon should be able to help. Please visit my website at www.Orthodoc.Aaos.Org/footankle. ...Read more

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How can I fix bow legs?

Depends on situation: Bow legs are often seen as a transitional finding when kids first start to walk, followed by a knock kneed phase between 3 & 5 and a straightening by 6-7.This occurs as the child's hips & legs begin to shift their growth to carry a growing upper body.If concerned your pcp can get x-rays to make sure the bowing is not a bone or metabolic issue & repeat the films 6m to a year later to show progress. ...Read more

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What to do to fix bow legs?

What to do  to fix bow legs?

Age, cause,severity: If severe deformity is present and there is an associated bony cause, may need surgery. If you are concerned, it is best to check with an orthopedics specialist. Physiologic bow legs in babies correct with time. ...Read more

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How to know if I have bow legs?

See your doctor: See your regular doctor and ask if you might have bowed legs that can be caused by physiologic genu varum (self-correcting with age/growth in children), blount's disease, or rickets. If your doctor is concerned, he/she may get x-rays of your legs and/or refer you to an orthopedic surgeon for further evaluation and treatment. See http://orthoinfo.Aaos.Org/topic.Cfm?Topic=a00230. ...Read more