Top
40
Doctor insights on: Is Hemochromatosis A Dominant Or Recessive Trait

Share
1

1
Is hemochromatosis considered dominant or considered recessive?

Is hemochromatosis considered dominant or considered recessive?

Recessive (sort of): The common genetic defect in the hfe gene for phenotypic hemochromatosis is the c282y/c282y homozygous. However other defects other than c282y can lead to hemochromatosis. C282y heterozgyotes with hhc are though to posses another unclassified defect. ...Read more

Dr. (Liz)Phuong Tran
320 Doctors shared insights

Hemochromatosis (Definition)

A medical condition caused by iron accumulation in the body. It can be the result of underlying hereditary disease or be due ...Read more


2

2
Is obesity a dominant or recessive trait?

Is obesity a dominant or recessive trait?

Explanation: Neither. Obesity do not have even cleat trait. Too many factors play roles: lifestyle and diet, physical activity are the most important. ...Read more

3

3
Is cystic fibrosis a dominant or recessive trait?

Is cystic fibrosis a dominant or recessive trait?

Recessive: One needs two defective copies of the cystic fibrosis to develop the disease. ...Read more

4

4
Is gestational diabetes a dominant or recessive trait?

Is gestational diabetes a dominant or recessive trait?

Complex disease: Gestational diabetes (gdm), like type 2 diabetes, are related metabolic conditions with strong inherited genetic tendencies --- but multiple genes are involved in their expression (appearance in any person). So gdm is neither a dominant nor recessive trait. Whether a person gets gdm is also strongly impacted by age, weight, exercise levels, dietary factors, which are not genetically determined. ...Read more

5

5
Is having aortic valve regurgitation a dominant or recessive trait?

Is having aortic valve regurgitation a dominant or recessive trait?

Usually acquired: Aortic regurgitation is usually an acquired disease. Some forms of congenital vascular disorders are associated with aortic valve problems such as Marfan's Syndrome and this can involve the aortic valve. This is rare. Marfan's is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern. Even more rarely it can also occur as a spontaneous mutation in someone who has no family history. ...Read more

6

6
Is it true that aortic valve regurgitation is a dominant or recessive trait?

Is it true that aortic valve regurgitation is a dominant or recessive trait?

AI: I am not aware of ai being genetically linked and can't find anything on line to point to say bicuspid valve inheritance as dominant or recessive. ...Read more

7

7
My grandmother and my mother both have tested positive for celiac disease. Is this a dominant or recessive trait?

My grandmother and my mother both have tested positive for celiac disease. Is this a dominant or recessive trait?

Neither: While you may inherit the immune risk factor from a parent that does not guarantee getting Celiac disease. If you have a 1st degree relative with confirmed Celiac disease then there is roughly a 20% chance of developing it in your lifetime. ...Read more

8

8
What do you suggest if my grandmother and my mother both have tested positive for celiac disease. Is it a dominant or recessive trait?

Genetic: You may carry the gene for celiac- It is not a dominant or recessive gene. It is a gene that is associate to a chromosome that has been identified. In order to get the condition, you need to have the gene and an environmental trigger. You can be tested to see if you have the gene. The DR8 gene profile is seen in a large part of the population and may explain why celiac is being seen often. ...Read more

9

9
What is the difference between an autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive trait?

What is the difference between an autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive trait?

Input required: In dominant disorders, the dominant member of the gene pair controls how the gene activities are expressed, so the other gene can carry the same or normal information. In recessive disorders, the normal gene compensates for the bad information in the other gene, allowing a person to function normally unless both genes carry the bad information. ...Read more

10

10
Why do people develop hemochromatosis?

Why do people develop hemochromatosis?

It's in the genes: In hereditary (= inherited from parents) hemochromatosis, too much iron is absorbed by the gut & deposits in tissues. Liver, heart, other damage can result. It is autosomal recessive: both parents must carry the gene & not all offspring will be affected. Secondary (= due to other causes) hemochromatosis can occur with certain types of hemolytic anemia (red blood cells bursting, releasing iron). ...Read more

11

11
What do you suggest if my friend has a hemochromatosis?

What do you suggest if my friend has a hemochromatosis?

Blood letting: Hemochromatosis can be easily managed by periodic removal of blood to drain the body of excess iron. This is about the only disease where the old practice of blood letting actually works. ...Read more

12

12
Which is the impact of hemochromatosis on the individual, family and society?

Which is the impact of hemochromatosis on the individual, family and society?

Homework question: An individual with hemochromatosis dies in middle age unless diagnosed and treated. Treatment is extremely easy compared with the other common killers and leads to a healthy life. Sufferers are often accused of being alcoholics in denial if their physicians are unaware of hemochromatosis. I hope you can flesh this out for class. Noncompliance and ignorance kill. ...Read more

13

13
Can hemochromatosis kill you?

Yes: Untreated, it's lethal. If it's unrecognized, your elevated liver enzymes may lead to your being accused of being a secret problem drinker. You'll lose your sexuality, develop arthritis, and eventually turn yellow, bloat up, and die over several years. It's not pleasant. If you are diagnosed with hemochromatosis, be aware that it's the easiest of all the killers to keep under control. ...Read more

14

14
Is the blood dark in hemochromatosis?

No: The color is normal. Brown blood usually means methemoglobin. ...Read more

15

15
Does stress make hemochromatosis worse?

Does stress make hemochromatosis worse?

Maybe: I see that you have this fairly common illness and I hope that you have having it managed scientifically. Physical and emotional stress are rough on the secondary diabetes that often results from hemochromatosis. If there is stress in your life, I hope it is what Selye called "eu-stress" to help you achieve & learn, and that you'll cope with "dis-tress" proactively. Best wishes. ...Read more

16

16
Are hemochromatosis and diabetes linked?

Are hemochromatosis and diabetes linked?

Very much so: Untreated hemochromatosis ("bronze diabetes") will often cause diabetes that will self-cure when the hemochromatosis is treated. ...Read more

17

17
Help docs! My friend has a hemochromatosis?

Glad it's diagnosed: Of all the common, dread diseases, this one is the easiest to manage. I'm going to assume this is primary hemochromatosis not secondary to transfusion for some other lifetime illness. Your friend will be treated with regular phlebotomy and will start feeling a whole lot better in a short time. ...Read more

18

18
How can you naturally treat hereditary hemochromatosis?

Blood donation: By regularly donating blood, one can lower the iron stores in the body. ...Read more

19

19
What is the difference between hemosiderosis & hemochromatosis?

Acquired vs.: Genetic. Hemochromatosis is the result of a mutation in the iron metabolism gene and body absorbs more iron than needed and it gets deposited in tissues and causes disease. Hemosidrosis usually occurs in people who need repeated transfusions of red cells, e.g, sickle cell disease, or thalassemia, the excess iron in transfused red cells deposits in the tissues. ...Read more

20

20
What is the difference between hemosiderosis and hemochromatosis?

What is the difference between hemosiderosis and hemochromatosis?

Hemochrom is Genetic: Primary hemochromatosis is a genetic disorder that causes too much iron in tissues. It can be treated by removing a little blood every week or so. Hemosiderosis is not genetic. Can be caused by alcoholism or having many blood transfusions leading to excess iron in your cells. ...Read more

21

21
What is the difference between hemosiderosis and hemochromatosis?

Iron overload: Both are forms of iron overload disorders with different etiologies and pathophysiology. Hereditary hemochromatosis is caused by a gene mutation and involves deposition of hemosiderin (storage form of iron) in the organs of the body, such as the heart, liver, pancreas, and skin. The two types of hemosiderosis are idiopathic pulmonary and transfusion-related. ...Read more

22

22
Can exposure to core samples in the oil field cause hemochromatosis?

Probably not: Hemochromatosis is a genetic disorder in which the body absorbs more iron than needed. I do not know the composition of cores you refer to, but it is not likely to cause hemochromatosis. You may consult this site for info: http://www. Mayoclinic. Org/diseases-conditions/hemochromatosis/home/ovc-20167289 ...Read more

23

23
My friend has hemochromatosis. He has never had therapeutic phlebotomy. What should he do?

My friend has hemochromatosis. He has never had therapeutic phlebotomy. What should he do?

Depends: Hi. Hemochromatosis can be a hereditary disease from mutations in the HFE gene, or it can be from transfusion dependency (e.g., for various alpha and beta- thalassemias). You can only treat the hereditary hemochromatosis with phlebotomy...you can't phlebotomize transfusion-dependant patients! Clarify what your friend has, and if he is in fact iron-overloaded. Phlebotomy is easy and very effective ...Read more

24

24
What do you suggest if my dad has niemann pick's disease type c and also hemochromatosis.?

Love him: Hemochromatosis is deadly if missed but very easy to manage. Niemann-Pick's C is getting picked up more often. See whether Dad wants to try to get into a study -- your physician can offer guidance. He's fortunate to have a youngster who cares. Best wishes. ...Read more

26

26
Why doesn't anyone know anything about hereditary hemochromatosis (hh) if it is so common? I feel all alone.

Under-recognized: Actually around 1 person in 200 has it, but it often gets missed -- I've seen it enough at autopsy as a "surprise". If you're diagnosed, be thankful that of all the common, lethal disease it is by far the easiest to manage. There's no glamor, ribbon parades, or sad advertisements simply becuase it's so readily manageable with phlebotomy. ...Read more

27

27
Can you tell me how to know if you have hemochromatosis diabetes or bronze diabetes/is there an online quiz you can take?

Can you tell me how to know if you have hemochromatosis diabetes or bronze diabetes/is there an online quiz you can take?

Real testing: Forget "online quizzes". This is the 21st century, and anything less than a real workup by your physician would be playing games with a life-and-death matter. If you have elevated liver enzymes, an elevated serum iron, ferritin, or transferrin saturation, the odd skin color or the arthritis at the base of the thumb, ask a competent physician to work you up ; rx if you have it. ...Read more

28

28
Has anyone had adult pt grow taller from Hemochromatosis? Saw post/study saying it causes that. Not Dx w/ it but is it poss why I'm growing in late30s

Get checked!: I can understand your worries. If you read the study, carefully, you will see that it's possible to be checked to see if that's what is wrong. Please see your doctor and find out, so you can relax. Best, if you get re-measured at a doctor's office who's measured your height before. The only way to found out what's going on is to see a doctor. We cannot give you a 100% correct diagnosis here. ...Read more

29

29
What is iron overload, hemochromatosis?

Too much bodily iron: As a result of the inability to increase iron loss, iron overload is an inevitable response to increased iron entry into the body. This can occur by one of three mechanisms - nutritional intake, increased absorption, parenteral sources (i.e. Transfusions). Hemochromatosis is abnormally high absorption of iron as result of a genetic defect. Extra iron can be toxic. ...Read more

30

30
I have hemochromatosis - can I donate blood?

I have hemochromatosis - can I donate blood?

No: Unfortunately, the red cross does not allow this blood to be donated even though there is nothing wrong with the blood. However, certain bacteria thrive on iron and that may be the red cross's rational. ...Read more

31

31
How exactly do you test for hemochromatosis?

How exactly do you test for hemochromatosis?

Varous blood work: Helpful., such as serum transferrin, transferin saturation, liver enzyme testing, ferritin level. Other options include, liver biopsy and imaging. ...Read more

32

32
What iron levels are considered "suspicious" for iron overload/hemochromatosis?

What iron levels are considered "suspicious" for iron overload/hemochromatosis?

Transferrin sat: Your best screen is transferrin saturation. Many of us think that the current recommendation of 45% or more for women, 50% of more for men miss too many people. If you actually have evidence of liver troubles (elevated SGOT / SGPT, for example), think about getting a serum ferritin. With a family history, get the gene testing to know early. ...Read more

33

33
Are there alternative therapies for hemochromatosis?

Are there alternative therapies for hemochromatosis?

Phlebotomy: Unfortunately, the only effective treatment is removing iron by removing units of blood on regular basis. ...Read more

34

34
Please doctor, I want to know what are the symptoms of hemochromatosis?

Many: Usually it's picked up as elevated liver enzymes / other labs, but once the hemochromatosis patient is treated by removal of blood / iron, they usually say, "wow! I no longer have the blahs." impotence, arthritis at the thumb base, the gray skin, lots more, all self-heal when it's treated. ...Read more

35

35
What causes the fatigue and aching with hemochromatosis?

What causes the fatigue and aching with hemochromatosis?

Liver, synovium: The liver dysfunction is probably behind the fatigue. The iron in the synovium of the joints causes the curious aches. Thankfully, hemochromatosis is the most treatable of all the great killers, and most people with it now lead normal lives. ...Read more

36

36
Which dr sees hemochromatosis?

Any: Any competent primary care physician can diagnose and arrange for treatment hemochromatosis. You may get sent to the gastroenterologist, cardiologist, endocrinologist and geneticist. The key is that if this is common hemochromatosis, you have the serious disease out of all of them that's easiest to manage effectively. ...Read more

37

37
Can I get cure with hemochromatosis?

No: But mainstay of treatment is therapeutic phlebotomy. ...Read more

38

38
Do a lot of people get hemochromatosis?

It's relatively rare: Hemochromatosis is a disorder where a person has too much iron in the blood. This can cause significant problems as iron will deposit in areas like the hear and liver. While it is typically rare, it can be seen if someone takes too much iron supplement. Generally, men should not take iron if they are otherwise healthy. Women, on the other hand, are usually ok provided they are still mentruati. ...Read more

39

39
What are the symptoms of hemochromatosis?

Varies: Many times, it is only presented with high iron saturation and or iron storage without having any symptoms.
However, the clinical manifestations of iron accumulation can include liver disease, elevation of liver enzymes, skin pigmentation, diabetes mellitus, arthropathy, impotence in males, and cardiac enlargement with or without heart failure or conduction defects etc. ...Read more

40

40
What happens when you have hemochromatosis?

Easy Rx: The key is that you got diagnosed, hopefully early. 1 person in 200 will be symptomatic with this. I'm going to assume the diagnosis is correct & it's common hemochromatosis. You'll have a pint of blood drained maybe 2x/week until you feel better / labs turn good. The blahs, thumb pain, lackluster love life, and whatever else will improve. Untreated, it kills you, treated you do great. ...Read more