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Doctor insights on: Intrauterine Adhesions

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Dr. Mark Trolice
8 doctors shared insights

Intrauterine Adhesions (Overview)

Intrauterine adhesions. Adhesions are bands that form between tissues and organs, often as a result of injury during surgery. They may be thought of as internal scar tissue that connect tissues not normally connected.


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Should i wait and see when it comes to an intrauterine adhesion?

Should i wait and see when it comes to an intrauterine adhesion?

Watch & wait: When it comes to adhesion more surgery can mean more adhesion. So surgery should be one of the last option for you. ...Read more

Dr. Mark Trolice
8 doctors shared insights

Intrauterine Adhesions (Overview)

Intrauterine adhesions. Adhesions are bands that form between tissues and organs, often as a result of injury during surgery. They may be thought of as internal scar tissue that connect tissues not normally connected.


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If I have adhesions. What kind of surgery is necessary for treatment?

If I have adhesions. What kind of surgery is necessary for treatment?

Why?: Adhesions are internal scar tissue that can form in the abdomen after prior surgery or pelvic infection. Adhesions form after most any surgery, and each subsequent operation may cause more adhesions or scar tissue to develop. Adhesions are usually removed if they are causing intestinal obstruction. Gynecologists may have other reasons. Surgery is not necessary just because adhesions may be present. ...Read more

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Is there anything I can do other than surgery to get rid of adhesions?

Is there anything I can do other than surgery to get rid of adhesions?

Unfortunately no: Adhesions can only be treated surgically and then frequently recur. Laparoscopic treatment yields the best results, but is not always possible and is fraught with possible complications. ...Read more

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Should i wait and see when it comes to an intrauterine adhesion?

Watch & wait: When it comes to adhesion more surgery can mean more adhesion. So surgery should be one of the last option for you. ...Read more

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I just had D&C, i am worried about Asherman syndrome When does the symptoms of amenorrhea appear how many months after the procedure, when do i know?

I just had D&C, i am worried about Asherman syndrome
When does the symptoms of amenorrhea appear how many months after the procedure, when do i know?

A few months: Asherman syndrome is not that common, so unless you have an unusual circumstance, try not to worry. Please wait two months to see if your cycle returns. ...Read more

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Can a scan detect asherman syndrome. I have had no periods for a while but really bad period cramps usually at the time it is meant to arrive.

Can a scan detect asherman syndrome. I have had no periods for a while but really bad period cramps usually at the time it is meant to arrive.

Only hysteroscopy/US: Because the walls of the uterus are collapsed on each other and/or filled with endometrial tissue, it is unlikely that a CT/MRI scan would be able to see any scar tissue. In order to see scar tissue, the uterus has to be filled with fluid first on hysteroscopy/sonohysterogram/hysterosalpingogram. ...Read more

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I am 8.5 weeks of pregnant & i've done u/s today and the reports is - single intrauterine gestation sac of 6 weeks, fatal pole not seen. Plz suggest?

I am 8.5 weeks of pregnant & i've done u/s today and the reports is - 
single intrauterine gestation sac of 6 weeks, 
fatal pole not seen. Plz suggest?

Get hCG levels: Measured approximately 3 days apart and a followup ultrasound in a couple of weeks (if the HCG levels are rising). Also, was the u/s transvaginal, or transabdominal? Transvaginal can see smaller structures sooner than transabdominal. ...Read more

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Adhesions==what are they and where?

Adhesions==what are they and where?

Same as Scarring: Adhesion, like adhesive means to stick together. Internal organs in the peritoneal cavity or in joints and other anatomical locations can stick together. This is usually via fibrous tissue the body uses to repair itself after injury. The injury is surgery. In surgery, we must cut through various tissues and the body reacts with adhesion formation, just as your skin heals together with a cut. ...Read more

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Which organs can be affected by adhesions?

Which organs can be affected by adhesions?

Mostly intestines: Usually the intestines are most affected by adhesions, but in theory, other organs could be as well. When intestines are affected, adhesions can cause a blockage that may require stomach decompression with a tube through the nose and sometimes surgery. ...Read more

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How to cure adhesion in endometriosis?

How to cure adhesion in endometriosis?

Difficult: Significant adhesions are actually not as common as one might realize. Our experience is about 30%. There are several liquid agents used at surgery but none have real proven benefit. We use "ovarian suspension" as a mechanism for getting the ovary and tube out of the raw area of dissection. We also employ uterine suspension, an old technique, when we do stage 4 cases with significant colon dz. ...Read more

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Dr. Mark Aranson
291 doctors shared insights

Adhesions (Definition)

Adhesions is a condition in which two or more organs or organ surfaces are stuck together. Adhesions are common after surgery or infection, in which the healing response causes scar tissue to connect organs that normally should slide around freely. Adhesions can cause symptoms such as abdominal ...Read more