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Doctor insights on: Intestinal Atresia

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Dr. Stephen Kim
93 doctors shared insights

Intestinal Atresia (Overview)

Intestinal atresia is a malformation where there is a narrowing or absence of a portion of the intestine. This defect can either occur in the small or large intestine.


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Whats intestinal malrotation?

Whats intestinal malrotation?

Developmental error: In fetus in initial stages of development all bowel is out side like a garden house, as abdominal wall develops it returns back in side in a systemic patron get rearranged by a series of steps, ( called rotation ) partial failure , like bands ( lad's ) etc called partial malrotation will cause obstruction of bowel in new born or later stages of life.Yes treatable by surgery. ...Read more

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Dr. Stephen Kim
93 doctors shared insights

Intestinal Atresia (Overview)

Intestinal atresia is a malformation where there is a narrowing or absence of a portion of the intestine. This defect can either occur in the small or large intestine.


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What are the tests for intestinal atresia?

What are the tests for intestinal atresia?

Ultrasound, x-ray: Ultrasounds can be used to diagnose intestinal atresia prior to birth. Once born if suspected, plain abdominal films or with contrast can diagnose and locate level of intestinal atresia. ...Read more

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Biliary atresia treatment?

Biliary atresia treatment?

Kasai procedure: Biliary atresia is most often diagnosed in the neonates. The first line treatment is a surgical procedure called portoenterotomy (kasai) in which a loop of intestine is connected to the liver to act as a conduit for bile drainage in place of the missing bile ducts. The beneficial effects of this procedure, however, is often short-lived many children went on to require liver transplantation. ...Read more

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Is biliary atresia hereditary?

No: There is no proof that it is hereditary. Fortunately it is quite rare. ...Read more

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Tracheo-oesophageal fistula and oesophageal atresia hereditary?

Tracheo-oesophageal fistula and oesophageal atresia hereditary?

Not usually: Esophageal atresia with or with out fistula is usually sporadic. There area a few cases ( and i mean very few) in the literature where a parent had ea-tef and had a child with same. It is reportable. ...Read more

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What are the symptoms of intestinal atresia?

What are the symptoms of intestinal atresia?

Vomiting: Intestinal atresia is a congenital blockage of the intestine that occurrs in newborns. It is treated by surgery, usually in the first feew days of life. Other symptoms include abdominal distension. Vomiting is usually bilious (green). ...Read more

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Is intestinal malrotation treatable?

Is intestinal malrotation treatable?

Treatable error: In fetus in initial stages of development all bowel is out side like a garden house, as abdominal wall develops it returns back in side in a systemic patron get rearranged by a series of steps, ( called rotation ) partial failure , like bands ( lad's ) etc called partial malrotation will cause obstruction of bowel in new born or later stages of life.Yes treatable by surgery. ...Read more

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Intestinal obstruction symptoms?

Intestinal obstruction symptoms?

Bowel obstruction: The patient feels sick, bloated abdomen, loss of passing gas/stool, nausea, fever and vomiting. Hospital admission becomes necessary for intravenous fluids and evaluation. ...Read more

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Can upper GI endoscopy shows intestinal cancer?

Can upper GI endoscopy shows intestinal cancer?

Sometimes but not: Often. Egd examines esophagus, stomach, duodenum (technically small intestine, but only the very first part), and sometimes the first portion of jejunum, which is the true small intestine. The small intestine is about 30 feet long. Then there is the large intestine, or colon, for which you need colonoscopy. The middle 29+ feet is not accessble via endocsopy. ...Read more

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What is the liver biliary atresia?

What is the liver biliary atresia?

Biliary atresia: Biliary atresia is a congenital scarring of the biliary ducts. These ducts transport bile made in the liver to the intestine so one can digest fats. The ducts scar and obliterate. Bile then cannot exit the liver which poisons the liver. These infants need corrective surgery before they are 2 months old. ...Read more

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Is biliary atresia detected before birth?

Is biliary atresia detected before birth?

No: Biliary atresia is unsuspected until there is a persistent rise in bilirubin of the direct type. Initial imaging study should be a preprandial gall bladder ultrasound to see if gall bladder is present. ...Read more

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Can upper GI endoscopy show intestinal cancer?

Can upper GI endoscopy show intestinal cancer?

Some areas.: Upper endoscopy can look at the esophagus, stomach, and at least the 1st portion of the duodenum; also the opening where the bile exits. It cannot look at and therefore cannot diagnose problems in the remainder of the duodenum, the ileum or the jejunum. However, capsule endoscopy can look at these other areas. ...Read more

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How common is intestinal malrotation?

Unusual: Symptomatic malrotation is estimated to occur in 1/6000 live births, and is a result of an incomplete rotation of intestine in fetus. ...Read more

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What is intestinal pseudo-obstruction?

What is intestinal pseudo-obstruction?

Ogilvie's syndrome: A patient can present with symptoms of obstruction, such as abdominal discomfort, bloating, nausea and vomiting, and radiological examination shows marked dilitation of the colon, but no obvious source for mechanical obstruction is found. Naso gastric suction, and colonoscopy for decompression of the colon may help up to 75% of the time, but in severe cases, surgery may help. ...Read more

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Does nec in newborn cause gastrointestinal perforation?

Does nec in newborn cause gastrointestinal perforation?

Maybe: Nec is short for necrotizing enterocolitis. Nec is an inflammation of the intestines, typically in premature infants, and can lead to perforation of the gut, but not always. This can be a very dangerous condition, but most babies survive and even fully recover. Talk with your nicu team to learn more about what is going on with your baby so you can understand why they are doing what they are doing. ...Read more

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What exactly causes biliary atresia?

What exactly causes biliary atresia?

See below: The causes of biliary atresia are not well established and are probably multifactorial; genetic factors may play a permissive role in some cases, but infectious, toxic, or immunologic mechanisms are probably involved. ...Read more

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What does extensive enterogastric biliary reflux mean?

What does extensive enterogastric biliary reflux mean?

Bile into stomach: The usual detection is during hida scan or nuclear medicine study, the isotope which mimics bile is seen going back into the stomach mostly after stimulation by cck. Endoscopy of the stomach can actually see bile in stomach. The problem is bile gastritis or irritated stomach from bile affecting stomach lining.There is usually motility disorder of duodenum, moving reverse direction. Medication. ...Read more

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Prevent abdominal adhesions from bowel obstruction?

Prevent abdominal adhesions from bowel obstruction?

Very difficult: Adhesions are bands of scar tissue that form inside the abdominal cavity after abdominal surgeries. Unfortunatel once you have them theres not much you can do to prevent a bowel obstruction in terms of diet or activity. Some people get obstructions frequently others never. If one occurs most times they can be managed without surgery but soetimes another surgery to free the intestines is necessary. ...Read more

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Intestine (Definition)

The gastrointestinal tract starts at the mouth, travel down the tunnel (esophagus), which connects to the stomach, which then empties into the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum---the three parts of the small intestine (@25 feet). This empties into the colon or large intestine (about 5 feet), which then becomes the sigmoid colon, rectum and out the anus. So, every morsel eaten ...Read more


Bowel (Definition)

The bowel is the intestinal tract in the body. The small intestine ...Read more