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Doctor insights on: Injectable Drug For Osteoporosis

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Is forteo drug for osteoporosis (injection pen) covered by medicaid? Any answer appreciated.

Is forteo drug for osteoporosis (injection pen) covered by medicaid? Any answer appreciated.

Yes: most state Medicaid plans pay for Forteo with pre authorization If you have definite osteoporosis or compression fractures or other types of fractures you will be able to receive it ...Read more

Dr. PHILIP WALLER
1,579 doctors shared insights

Osteoporosis (Definition)

A condition in which bones ...Read more


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Is there a generic drug equivalent for Fosamax or actonel (risedronate)?

Is there a generic drug equivalent for Fosamax or actonel (risedronate)?

Yes & no: Fosamax is off patent - the generic is alendronate. Generics are absolutely as effective as the brand name. Actonel (risedronate) is still on patent. No generic form exists yet. ...Read more

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Can evista (raloxifene) be taken with strontium for osteoporosis?

Can evista (raloxifene) be taken with strontium for osteoporosis?

No due to blood clot: Both Evista (raloxifene) and strontium alone can cause blood clots. The combination has the risk of increasing the risk of blood clots even more. Blood clots can be fatal. There is no good data on the combination, so it's not recommended. ...Read more

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Which drug would you choose for osteoporosis of hip prolia or reclast (zoledronic acid) what is better tolerated less side effects?

Which drug would you choose for osteoporosis of hip  prolia or reclast (zoledronic acid)    what is better tolerated less side effects?

Depends: Both drugs are effective in the treatment of osteoporosis involving the hip. Prolia is likely to work better than reclast, (zoledronic acid) though there are no head to head studies comparing the two. Prolia is typically used in people who have had a previous fracture (spine, wrist), or have very severe osteoporosis. Both are well tolerated with few side effects. Prolia is given twice yearly, Reclast (zoledronic acid) once yearly. ...Read more

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Could you take the drug evista (raloxifene) and have lidocaine injected for surgery?

Yes: Evista (raloxifene) is an oral estrogen receptor modulator and is used for prevention of bone loss in postmenopausal women while Lidocaine is a local anesthetic and thus it can safely be used in patients on evista (raloxifene). ...Read more

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Medication for osteoperosis?

Treatment: If you are asking if there are treatments- yes. Otherwise, not sure what you are asking... ...Read more

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Prolia inyection for osteoporosis and side effects?

Prolia inyection for osteoporosis and side effects?

Not much: That is statistically different from placebo, though everything under the sun has been reported it is hard to link it to the drug. The one side effect that is different by about2% is infection, do I would not give it to a compromised person or one who had an acting infection. The debate ove osteonecrosis of the jaw continues on. ...Read more

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Is evista (raloxifene) commonly used for osteoporosis, or are there dangerous side effects?

Blood clotting: The most common is worsening of menopausal symptoms, but blood clots (particulary in the legs) are much more serious. Do not use if you're a smoker or have a problem with clotting. ...Read more

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Is Fosamax (alendronate) safe to use for people?

Is Fosamax (alendronate) safe to use for people?

Yes for most people: Fosamax (alendronate) is generally well tolerated and a proven treatment for reducing the risk for hip and spine fractures due to osteoporosis. But for some people with conditions affecting the esophagus or stomach, or with chronic kidney disease, or who need extensive dental work, there can be serious side effects. Ask your doctor if any of these situations apply to you. ...Read more

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Is bisphosphonate is effective for osteoporosis?

Is bisphosphonate is effective for osteoporosis?

Osteoporosis.: For osteoporosis, it's weight bearing exercise, calcium and vitamin D3 supplementation, keep your weight down. Medications (the bisphosphonates) when necessary would include Fosamax, Actonel or Boniva (ibandronate). You'd need bone density tests every two to three years after you reach the menopause and treat more aggressively with medications dependent on the results. ...Read more

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What are side effects of the drug alendronate/fosamax for osteoporosis..?

Mostly heartburn: Alendronate is generally well tolerated. Reflux is the most common side effect. It can also cause bone pain, esophageal ulcers or narrowing. The generic alendronate may have more GI side effects because it is not coated. This concern has not been answered adequately enough in large studies. It is very important to discuss these issues with your physician. ...Read more

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Is boniva (ibandronate) better than miacalcin for osteoporosis?

I believe so: The studies that have been done do show miacaclcin to be a better drug overall but particularly hip fractures which are so important. ...Read more

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Are strontium ranelate and strontium citrate recognised, beneficial treatments for severe osteoporosis?

Are strontium ranelate and strontium citrate recognised, beneficial treatments for severe osteoporosis?

Not approved: These two therapies are under investigation, but have not yet been approved in the us. ...Read more

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Is prolia best for osteoporosis?

Is prolia best for osteoporosis?

Maybe: Prolia represents a new category of osteoporosis treatment that is effective and has convenient twice yearly dosing. It appears much more effective than the bisphosphonates and rivals Forteo with much more convenience. It is expensive if not covered by your insurance. Whether it is best for you or not depends on many factors which would require more information about a specific patient. ...Read more

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Which drug is contraindicted for a patient receiving anticoagulant therapy?

Which drug is contraindicted for a patient receiving anticoagulant therapy?

Coumadin (warfarin): There are different anticoagulants out there with different indications. I will just make the assumption you are talking about warfarin. In which case foods that are high in vitamin K like liver, leafy green vegetables, or vegetable oils can make Coumadin less effective. ...Read more

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Do depot antipsychotics (prolixin (fluphenazine) injection) have any advantages over oral antipsychotics (oral prolixin) other than medication adherence ?

Do depot antipsychotics (prolixin (fluphenazine) injection) have any advantages over oral antipsychotics (oral prolixin) other than medication adherence ?

Ans: There are some antipsychotic med studies that show greater effectiveness of the long-acting injection med vs oral in severe psychiatric illness, eg, schizophrenia. Studies have also shown in severe psych. illness that relapse and overall hospital days are less with out-patient care utilizing long-acting antipsychotic med injections vs oral form relying on patient reliability. ...Read more

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Is there a replacement drug for prescription estratest (esterified estrogens and methylestosterone)?

Is there a replacement drug for prescription estratest (esterified estrogens and methylestosterone)?

Yes: Generic equivalents include Covaryx and EEMT. There are alsomany compounded creams, gels, sprays, etc. Compounded drugs are made by a local compounding pharmacy based on a prescription written by your doctor. The advantage is that your doctor can adjust the dose and ratio to your unique needs since one or two sizes do not fit all women. Best wishes ...Read more

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What are the side effects for taking oral MS drugs as opposed to copaxone (glatiramer) and all the other injectable drugs.

What are the side effects for taking oral MS drugs as opposed to copaxone (glatiramer) and all the other injectable drugs.

Complex : All ms drugs have potential side effects, and Copaxone has injection site reactions, lipoatrophy, an occasional chest/flushing reaction, and of course, the need to inject. All three orals are well tolerated in most folks, but tecfidera may cause severe nausea, diarrhea. Better tolerated might be Gilenya (fingolimod) or aubagio. Talk to neurologist about your best approach. ...Read more

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