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Doctor insights on: Infarction

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Dr. Debra Rosenblatt
3 Doctors shared insights

Infarction (Overview)

When the blood supply of a tissue is compromised by whatever mechanism, the tissue will stop working and if blood flow is not restored, the tissue will eventually die ("infarct", both verb and noun). The clinical picture that runs with development of an infarct ("heart attack"; "stroke") is called "infarction".


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What is anteroseptal infarction?

What is anteroseptal infarction?

Anteroseptal: Anteroseptal myocardial infarction is usually caused by occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery. This cuts off blood flow to the anteroseptal muscle and infarction (death)of that muscle. We call this an anteroseptal MI or infarction ...Read more

Dr. Debra Rosenblatt
3 Doctors shared insights

Infarction (Overview)

When the blood supply of a tissue is compromised by whatever mechanism, the tissue will stop working and if blood flow is not restored, the tissue will eventually die ("infarct", both verb and noun). The clinical picture that runs with development of an infarct ("heart attack"; "stroke") is called "infarction".


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What is an anteroseptal infarction?

What is an anteroseptal infarction?

Anteroseptal: Anteroseptal myocardial infarction is usually caused by occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery. This cuts off blood flow to the anteroseptal muscle and infarction (death)of that muscle. We call this an anteroseptal MI or infarction ...Read more

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What is an anteroseptal infarction?

What is an anteroseptal infarction?

Anteroseptal: Anteroseptal myocardial infarction is usually caused by occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery. This cuts off blood flow to the anteroseptal muscle and infarction (death)of that muscle. We call this an anteroseptal MI or infarction ...Read more

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What is a possible old inferior infarction?

What is a possible old inferior infarction?

Inferior MI: Old (ie, completed and not acute) myocardial infarctions may be detected by ecg's. Some of the ECG (ekg) leads record electrical activity in the inferior (lower) part of the heart. Characteristic electrical patterns in these leads may indicate a previous mi. The computer generated analyses of ECG tracings are subject to error and must be interprtd by your physician. Please speak to him or her. ...Read more

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What is the definition or description of: infarction?

What is the definition or description of: infarction?

Death from no blood: When the blood supply of a tissue is compromised by whatever mechanism, the tissue will stop working and if blood flow is not restored, the tissue will eventually die ("infarct", both verb and noun). The clinical picture that runs with development of an infarct ("heart attack"; "stroke") is called "infarction". ...Read more

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I have a spleenic infarction what has to be done to repair this?

I have a spleenic infarction what has to be done to repair this?

Why?: It will heal on its own but the cause should be sought and corrected. Why did you get a splenic infarction? ...Read more

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What is mycocardial infarction?

What is mycocardial infarction?

MI: MI is the medical term that people commonly call "a heart attack". It is injury and cellular death of heart muscle tissue due to lack of circulation. ...Read more

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How do infarction and gangrene differ?

How do infarction and gangrene differ?

Infarction is the...: Death of tissue, like a myocardial infarction (heart attack) or a brain infarction (stroke). Gangrene implies an infection, not necessarily of dead tissue but it generally leads to dead tissue. ...Read more

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Where do most myocardial infarctions occur?

Where do most myocardial infarctions occur?

Varies: You have three main blood vessels feeding the heart - the right coronary, left circumflex, and the left anterior descending arteries. Narrowing can occur in any of the vessels and can be significant in any one or combination of these vessels. Bypass of the left anterior descending artery has shown the best change for improvement in life expectancy. ...Read more

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What is the definition of non-q-wave infarction?

What is the definition of non-q-wave infarction?

EKG diagnosis: When a piece of heart muscle dies, it no longer has electrical activity. This shows up on an ekg as a q wave. If someone clinically has a heart attack but the ekg never evolves q waves, it is (by definition) a "non-q wave" mi. ...Read more

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What is the difference between infarction and ischemia?

What is the difference between infarction and ischemia?

Stage of disease: In infarction when blood supply completely cut off the tissue dies as in heat attack with damage to heart muscle, con not be reversed, in ischemia blood supply diminishes (reduced) could be reversed no damage yet, this the stage heart attacks could be preventable by proper treatment (s) and intervention. Same with any other organ ...Read more

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What are the differences between infarction and gangrene?

What are the differences between infarction and gangrene?

Good question: When blood supply is interrupted the segment tissue that receives blood will die scar tissue will fill the gap as seen in heart attach myocardial infraction. (heart attack), in gangrene initial stages same tissue necrosis or death tissue occurs, then get infected as seen in lower extremities and bowel etc. ...Read more

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Can you please tell me how infarction and gangrene differ?

Gangrene?: Infarction refers to the early state of a tissue in which blood supply has been 'shut off' - like immediately after a heart attack (myocardial infarction). Infarcted tissue can heal if blood flow is restored.

Gangrene refers to the long term state of tissue that has been completely deprived of blood supply - essentially rotting tissue. There are 'dry' and 'wet' types of gangrene. ...Read more

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Are onion and garlic good to myocardiac infarction patients?

OK: I am not aware of any harmful effects of garlic or onions in patients with ischemic heart disease or after a myocardial infarction. ...Read more

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What are the differences between ischaemia and infarction in terms of definition, cause and clinical example?

What are the differences between ischaemia and infarction in terms of definition, cause and clinical example?

Ischemia infarction: Ischemia is decreased oxygenated blood flow and infarction is the death of that tissue. Atherosclerosis, inflammation, and clots can obstruct blood flow and lead to heart attacks and strokes. One hopes to prevent both with exercise and mediteranian diet and weight loss. ...Read more

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What is cardiac infarction?

What is cardiac infarction?

Heart attack: It's another term for heart attack. Nothing else. ...Read more

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Are myocardial infarctions curable?

Are myocardial infarctions curable?

No: A myocardial infarction is an acute event in which a portion of the heart is irreversably destroyed, usually by a blocked artery. The major lesson is that this damage is potentially avoided if people come to an er promptly when they have symptoms, which have been discussed elsewhere. We have a short time window to use modern treatment to save the heart and prevent complications and death. ...Read more

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What causes a splenic infarction?

No Blood to Spleen: A splenic infarction occurs when there is not enough blood going to the spleen to give it nutrients & oxygen its cells need to survive. Anything that cuts off blood supply to the spleen can cause an infarct. Ex. Trauma causing blood vessels to be destroyed, sickle cell anemia & other problems that lead to clogged arteries going to the spleen, autoimmune disease, blood cell disease, emboli, etc. ...Read more

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Dr. M. Hytham Beck
3 Doctors shared insights

Infarct (Definition)

It means an area of tissue death due to lack of oxygen most commonly associated with ...Read more