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Doctor insights on: Ice And Anemia

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Does chewing ice cause anemia?

Does chewing ice cause anemia?

What you are.....: Describing is pagophagia, the consumption of ice in the setting of anemia, usually due to an fe deficiency state. The ice consumption is not causative, but rather emblematic. You should see your dr and be evaluated for fe deficiency. You may find that your dr checks your hematocrit and red cell indices, and if microcytic hypochromic anemia is detected, starts you on fe rx (cheaper than fe testing). ...Read more

Dr. Steven Ginsberg
1,283 Doctors shared insights

Anemia (Definition)

Any condition where there is a decrease in the red blood ...Read more


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Can chewing on ice chips cause anemia?

Can chewing on ice chips cause anemia?

No: There is an old wive's tale that chewing ice is a sign that someone may be anemic. But there is no way that chewing ice can actually cause anemia. ...Read more

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Is ice chewing a symptom of anemia?

PICA: In medicine we call "pica" to the strong desire to eat or drink very unusual substances or foods. Children and adults with pica may eat:
animal feces, clay, dirt, hairballs, ice, paint, sand. This pattern of eating should last 1 mo. In pregnancy, in childhood, and in malnourished populations is more common. It is true that iron or zinc deficiency could be present but could also be psycological. ...Read more

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Is it normal to have ice cravings with beta thalassemia anemia?

Is it normal to have ice cravings with beta thalassemia anemia?

Maybe: Ice cravings has been reported as a symptom of iron deficiency anemia. Some people believe ice cravings also occur in other forms of anemia, such as thalassemia anemias. It is not known how many non-anemic persons have ice cravings, so it is unknown how likely it would be for a ice cravings to occur coincidentally with an anemia but not due to the anemia. ...Read more

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Is ice chewing a indication of anemia? Is ice chewing a side effect of anemia?

Is ice chewing a indication of anemia? Is ice chewing a side effect of anemia?

Hello.: Hello. Pica is when people chew or eat things which aren’t food. For instance, children who chew on or swallow stones. Pagophagia is one type of pica. The person develops cravings to chew on ice. It can occur in people who are very stressed. It has been shown to occur in iron deficiency anemia and it has been suggested that it can also occur with zinc deficiency. ...Read more

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If eating ice a lot is a sign or symptom of anemia & my labs are negative why do I crave or want ice?

Symptoms vs. Causes: Simple question, no simple answer. As complex embodied souls attached to a mind, fragile brain+body, variations in behavior are extremely common. Medicine is empiric more than scientific. While physicians often rely on symptoms as possible clues (where people seem to behave more similarly than differently), the relationship is complex & in most cases poorly understood, if at all & very individual. ...Read more

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I eat a lot of ice. I let it sit for while until its soft people ask me daily if I am anemic is this craving a symptom of anemia?

I eat a lot of ice. I let it sit for while until its soft people ask me daily if I am anemic is this craving a symptom of anemia?

Iron deficiency: Pagophagia, or craving ice, is caused by iron deficiency. Low iron makes you tired, pale, lightheaded, and short of breath, and gives you foggy thinking, poor hair and nail growth, itching, and restless legs. Although most commonly caused by menstrual bleeding, it is important that a woman your age undergo a full gastroenterology evaluation to look for bleeding caused by ulcers, polyps, or cancer. ...Read more

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Beta thalassemia anemia and ice cravings?

Beta thalassemia anemia and ice cravings?

A type of pica: Craving ice is a common symptom seen among patients with thalassemia, sickle cell disease, and other chronic anemias. Why this occurs is not fully understood. ...Read more

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Is eating large amount of ice all day long really linked with anemia deficiency?

Is eating large amount of ice all day long really linked with anemia deficiency?

PICA: Pica is characterized by an appetite for substances largely non-nutritive, such as ice cubes, clay, chalk, dirt, baking soda or sand pica is associated and actually one of the symptoms that can be found in patients with iron deficiency anemia. Pica is more commonly seen in women and children. ...Read more

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I eat about 7 pounds of ice a week. Is this unhealthy? I did have a problem with anemia but last blood test was normal. I've had the cravings 2 years

Maybe: People who eat ice, or starch or in some areas clay often have an iron deficiency problem. Though you said you had anemia which was now proved normal--you may still have a degree of iron deficiency, which can only be evaluated with specific blood tests--serum iron, per cent iron saturation and ferritin. If you have menstrual periods, you loose iron every month. Are you on vitamins with iron? ...Read more

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I'm 31 weeks pregnant and crave ice a lot. Is this a sign of anemia? If it goes untreated could it be harmful to me and baby?

Pica: This is a condition not completely understood, called pica. Most women will describe a craving for ice, but other foods, and even clay and dirt, are also common. Iron hunger in the face of anemia is certainly one theory, but remember, you're making a new person, and adding 50% more blood to your system. So your iron demands are going to be higher. Ask your doctor if he checked you for anemia. ...Read more

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Can a person experience some symptoms of anemia without being anemic? Borderline anemic? His hct was about 40, he is often tired, pale, eats ice, etc.

Can a person experience some symptoms of anemia without being anemic? Borderline anemic? His hct was about 40, he is often tired, pale, eats ice, etc.

Yes: You can have iron deficiency without having anemia yet. You could have vitamin B12 deficiency-without having significant anemia-yet etc. Yes, you could feel tired etc. But having said that, those symptoms also can be caused by different things like depression, thyroid problems, high blood sugar, chronic disease etc. D/w your md- and your doc can check few basic labs to help him out. ...Read more

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Why do victims of iron deficiency anemia crave and chew ice so much?

Why do victims of iron deficiency anemia crave and chew ice so much?

Pagophagia: The exact relationship between chewing on ice and iron deficiency has not been exactly worked out. Many physicians will order iron studies on patients that report chewing on ice just to make sure there are no deficiencies. Further studies will be needed. ...Read more

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Some people with iron deficiency anemia crave and chew ice so much. Why is that?

Some people with iron deficiency anemia crave and chew ice so much. Why is that?

I am not sure: We know exactly. It is known as pica. The ice is common in the north. In the south some people eat clay soil and or corn starch. ...Read more

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What is anemia?

What is anemia?

Low blood count: Anemia is a low red blood cell count, it can caused by low iron levels or from loss of blood. Red blood cells carry oxygen through the body. If you are anemic you have less of this oxygen-carrying capability and symptoms include fatigue, racing heart and dizziness. It is usually treated with iron supplements. ...Read more

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What is anemia?

What is anemia?

Anemia: A low red blood cell count. Many potential causes that need investigation. ...Read more

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What ia anemia?

Low blood hemoglobin: Anemia is low blood hemoglobin (red blood cell part). It can be caused from many things, but particularly blood loss in menstruation from women and from cancer in the colon, or kidney disease. ...Read more

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What is anemia?

Low red blood cells: Anemia is a low number of red blood cells. The most common reason is low iron stores, but there are many other causes. In any case, if someone is anemic they need to find out why ...Read more

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Is anemia cureble?

Is anemia cureble?

There are many ways: The therapeutic approach taken depends upon the underlying cause, and causes of anemia are many and varied. They can result from impaired rbc production (eg., nutritional deficiencies, marrow infiltration, etc), hematoma, blood loss (gi bleed, hemorrhage, epistaxis, etc.), hemolysis, thalassemia, hemoglobinopathies, etc. Do you have a specific cause that you would like information about re: rx? ...Read more

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What causes anemia?

What causes anemia?

Good question: Anemia is simply a red cell mass insufficient to meet the needs of the tissues without triggering compensatory mechanisms. A mathematical definition is a red cell mass that is more than 2 standard deviations below the mean for age and sex. There are many causes of anemia, that reflect either decreased production or increased losses. If this is an issue for you, you need to be evaluated by your dr. ...Read more

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What causes anemia?

Different causes: Anemia is a general term essentially meaning a low red blood cell count. There are lots of causes of different types of anemia. Iron deficiency is one of the more common types. A B12 deficiency can cause a different type. Your doctor can runs tests to try to determine a specific cause. If the problem remains, the patient should see a hematologist. ...Read more

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What causes anemia?

Good question: Anemia is simply a red cell mass insufficient to meet the needs of the tissues without triggering compensatory mechanisms. A mathematical definition is a red cell mass that is more than 2 standard deviations below the mean for age and sex. There are many causes of anemia, that reflect either decreased production or increased losses. If this is an issue for you, you need to be evaluated by your dr. ...Read more

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What causes anemia?

Many reasons: It coul be so many reasons including low iron, b12, fa etc. ...Read more

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What can cause anemia?

Many causes: Anemia is low blood count and may be mild or serious. Either you body does not produce enough red cells (blood cell cancer, uremia, chemotherapy, low iron, malnutrition) or you are actively bleeding (ulcers, trauma, GI malignancy, gu malignancy) or you are destroying your cells (inherited, splenic overactivity). Your hematologist needs to sort this out. If the cause is gone, you can do well. ...Read more