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Doctor insights on: Hypertension Probably Contributes To Atherosclerosis By

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How is hypertension related to atherosclerosis?

How is hypertension related to atherosclerosis?

Narrows pipe: Just as narrowing your garden hose can give you a thinner stronger stream; however the real concern is a plaque ain't smooth. Damage a platelet, get a clot, stop the all important flow of blood. Lack of oxygen causes death to cells fed by this area. Picture this in the vessels that feed your heart or your brain. ...Read more

Dr. Corey Clay
324 Doctors shared insights

Hypertension (Definition)

A blood pressure reading has two numbers: a systolic blood pressure and a diastolic blood pressure. The systolic blood pressure is the maximum pressure the blood exerts on the vessels when the heart is beating. The diastolic blood pressure is the pressure the blood exerts on the vessels in between heartbeats. Hypertension, or high blood pressure, begins when the systolic blood pressure remains above 140 or when the diastolic blood pressure remains above 90. Hypertension can be a result of increased blood flow through vessels or increased resistance to ...Read more


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Can a person have hypertension and atherosclerosis but have low cholesterol like I do.

Can a person have hypertension and atherosclerosis but have low cholesterol like I do.

Yes: The etiology of atherosclerosis is only partly understood. Genetic factors and other components like triglycerides role and fatty acids is not fully understood yet. ...Read more

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Atherosclerosis in the extremities and hypertension, what to do?

Atherosclerosis in the extremities and hypertension, what to do?

Check for vasc dx: Must check for vascular diseases (vasculitis, kawasaki disease, IgA nephropathy-burguer's disease, etc. ...Read more

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Can LDL be too low for a patient with a history of atherosclerosis, TIA, hypertension and currently on NOAC? Current LDL at 50 under 20mg simvastatin

Can LDL be too low for a patient with a history of atherosclerosis, TIA, hypertension and currently on NOAC? Current LDL at 50 under 20mg simvastatin

LDL-P or LDL-C? Big: Difference. Outcomes always match LDL-P (http://goo. Gl/zwrkCs); Not LDL-C [a guess of how much cholesterol (in mg) is carried by all LDL particles in a dL of blood plasma] data, See: http://goo. Gl/NmdIfm. Since every cell in body manufactures cholesterol (part of every cell membrane), very low LDL-C (down into teens) is rarely a health issue. LDL-P not being very low IS a major health issue. ...Read more

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Pectoris atherosclerosis congestive heart failure coronary artery disease dilate hypertension myocardial angina pectoris, what are these?

Pectoris atherosclerosis congestive heart failure coronary artery disease dilate hypertension myocardial angina pectoris, what are these?

Cv words: These all refer to cardiovascular particulars. Pectoris = Chest. Atherosclerosis = vascular wall scarring from cholesterol deposit. Coronary artery disease = narrowing and atherosclerosis of heart arteries. Dilate = expand diameter. Hypertension = high blood pressure (within arterial network). Myocardial = heart. Angina pectoris = pain of chest from coronary artery disease, lack of oxygen to heart ...Read more

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Why does high blood pressure cause atherosclerosis?

Why does high blood pressure cause atherosclerosis?

Injury to artery: When the heart beats, it moves blood through the arteries in your body. High blood pressures causes arteries throughout the body to swell and stretch more than they would normally. This stretching can injure the endothelium, the lining of all arteries. Injured endothelium attracts more "bad" LDL cholesterol and white blood cells. The cholesterol and cells build up, causing plaque/ atherosclerosis. ...Read more

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Is it worse to have high blood pressure or atherosclerosis?

Is it worse to have high blood pressure or atherosclerosis?

Both bad: You must control your hbp with proper meds and lower your cholesterol to proper levels to halt the progression of atherosclerosis (and in some cases, even reverse it). ...Read more

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Would you most likely have high blood pressure if you have coronary atherosclerosis?

Yes: It turns out hypertension (HTN) is considered a "modifiable risk factor" for coronary artery disease (cad)- this means that treating HTN will decrease the risk of cad. About 40%-60% who need a heart bypass have htn. Many consider HTN the greatest risk factor cad. So, yes, you are likely to have HTN if you have CAD but there are always exceptions! ...Read more

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Can you tell me how could artificial sweetener cause atherosclerosis and high blood pressure?

Can you tell me how could artificial sweetener cause atherosclerosis and high blood pressure?

Build up of fatty ma: It causes build up of fatty material along the walls of the artery, which leads to high cholesterol and high bp, according to a study in 2011 published in molecules and cells. ...Read more

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Does everyone with high cholesterol and high blood pressure automatically have coronary atherosclerosis?

Does everyone with high cholesterol and high blood pressure automatically have coronary atherosclerosis?

No: Vascular diseases are multifactorial. However, not controlling your medical conditions, such as high cholesterol, high blood pressure, diabetes, etc. Can make you more prone to developing vascular problems, and clearly if you already have coronary or peripheral vascular disease, not managing these issues will lead to more rapid progression of the disease process. ...Read more

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Would you most likely have high cholesterol and/or high blood pressure as cause of coronary atherosclerosis?

Would you most likely have high cholesterol and/or high blood pressure as cause of coronary atherosclerosis?

Yes: High blood press and high cholesterol are two of the risk factors for development of coronary disease. Other risk factors include diabetes, cigarette smoking, and positive family history. Other factors may include lack of exercise, obesity, stress and type a personality. Some people with normal BP and cholesterol may develop heart disease. The more risks factors one has raise the odds. ...Read more

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What treatment option integrates treatment for high blood pressure, arteriosclerosis, atherosclerosis, and coronary heart?

What treatment option integrates treatment for high blood pressure, arteriosclerosis, atherosclerosis, and coronary heart?

Best to Address All: The LDL & HDL lipoproteins (protein particles which carry all fats in the water outside cells, see NMR particle test) are the primary issue, along with blood glucose (optimal hba1c ≤5.0%), blood pressure (sbp ≤120 mmhg), no smoking & several other issues, known & not. Thus best to address all issues in unisyn, do not aim for normal. Instead aim for excellence: absence of drivers of the disease. ...Read more

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Can you tell me how could sugar and salt, such tiny particles cause high blood pressure, blocked arteries, overweightness, etc?

Can you tell me how could sugar and salt, such tiny particles cause high blood pressure, blocked arteries, overweightness, etc?

Body response: It's not the particles themselves that cause the problems. Sugar leads to increase in blood sugar and the body's response to this is secretion of certain hormones, including things like cortisol (a steroid), which can have elevate blood pressure. Same with sodium, except the effect comes from the kidneys, a different hormone is secreted, but again, that hormone causes increase in blood pressure. ...Read more

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Do high blood pressure and blocked arteries go hand in hand?

Do high blood pressure and blocked arteries go hand in hand?

Yes and no: Blood pressure before the block in a blocked artery will definitely be higher. The blood pressure after the block could be zero. ...Read more

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What can contribute to hypertension?

What can contribute to hypertension?

Many factors: Family history that means genetic reason, overweight/obese, high sodium diet, sedative life style, etc. ...Read more

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Is it true that high cholesterol contributes to hypertension?

Is it true that high cholesterol contributes to hypertension?

Indirectly: It is not certain that someone with high cholesterol will have high blood pressure. Lots of people have only one, but a majority of those with hypertension will also have high lipids. This is due to the metabolic syndrome and may be mediated by Insulin resistance due to the western diet. In rare cases, the renal artery becomes narrowed from cholesterol leading directly to secondary hypertension. ...Read more

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What is the significance of hypertension and what can contribute to it?

What is the significance of hypertension and what can contribute to it?

Blood pressure: Hypertension is when the blood pressure exceeds 140/90 mmhg for a significant part of the day. If untreated, these people have an increased incidence of atherosclerotic disease, heart attack, stroke and kidney failure. ...Read more

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How do the kidney and vascular diseases contribute to hypertension?

How do the kidney and vascular diseases contribute to hypertension?

Renin-Aldosterone: Entire medical books have been written on this mechanism of action. Basically when the kidney has a blockage in the arteries leading to it it perceives a low blood pressure. Since the kidney has the ability to release a chemical signal that tells the body to increase blood pressure it does just that. The problem is is that blood pressure is increased throughout the entire body, not just the kidney, and can have adverse effects. ...Read more

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Referred to nephrologist to see if kidneys contributing to hypertension. He ordered blood tests, including ANA. Why? What would it tell?

Referred to nephrologist to see if kidneys contributing to hypertension. He ordered blood tests, including ANA. Why? What would it tell?

ANA: ANA or antinuclear antibody titers are typically used for screening for connective tissue disease, lupus or lupus like diseases that are typically affecting the kidneys in time. ...Read more

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Y is BP in hypertension throughout the following day (s) after intense resistance training? Once I do cardio it goes back to optimal. Multiple readings

Y is BP in hypertension throughout the following day (s) after intense resistance training? Once I do cardio it goes back to optimal. Multiple readings

Not likely: First, relax. The blood pressure is not CHRONICALLY exacerbated by resistance exercise, though it may be while doing it. Being worried about it will itself potentially raise your BP. Cardio, or aerobic, exercise will benefit BP in the long term. Your anxiety is likely playing a role in your BP measurements, regardless of the exercise routine. ...Read more

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What is the average of hypertension for mid 30's female? 145-135/90-80 are my average. Do I need exercise or change of food habit?

What is the average of hypertension for mid 30's female? 145-135/90-80 are my average. Do I need exercise or change of food habit?

You're borderline: If things change further you will need to be on
bp medication
Id try to curtail some of your diet - fried foods, excess
meat,
try to lose some weight
regular aerobic exercise ...Read more

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Many people think they can feel their hypertension. Maybe it is the inevitable side effects of their medication (s) they are experiencing?

Many people think they can feel their hypertension. Maybe it is the inevitable side effects of their medication (s) they are experiencing?

Hypertension: Hypertension is not something you can dependably feel. Much of the time it may be completely asymptomatic. If someone believes he has symptoms when his blood pressure is up, he should also check the blood pressure when not symptomatic; it may be elevated then too. ...Read more

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Medical #: do people really ever have hypertension where no titrating of prescription (s), diet or exercise lowers the pressure? Alternatives?

Medical #: do people really ever have hypertension where no titrating of prescription (s), diet or exercise lowers the pressure? Alternatives?

Resistant: Hypertension can be difficult to control:
1. Lifestyle (continued overweight, high alcohol or salt intake)
2. Underlying severe essential hypertension. Many people with essential hypertension need 3-5 prescription drugs daily. More powerful diuretics (furosemide, spironolactone) may have a dramatic effect.
3. Rare secondary hypertension due to meds, kidney or adrenal disease.
Hope this helps you. ...Read more

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What cause hypertension?

What cause hypertension?

Hypertension: There are several medical causes of hypertension such as renal artery stenosis, hyperthyroidism, but most often the cause is unknown often called essential hypertension. The most important factor is that you get and keep your blood pressure controlled. ...Read more

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Symptoms of hypertension?

Renal Failure&stroke: Problem is you usually don't notice anything. If hypertension persists untreated it can lead to renal (kidney) failure, stroke, heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, etc. At the very least, you can get your blood pressure checked in many supermarkets or pharmacies at their automated blood pressure machines. Desirable results would be less than 120/80 mm hg. ...Read more

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Can hypertension be cured?

Can hypertension be cured?

It depends: Some causes of hypertension are reversible, most are not because in 95% of the cases we do not know what causes the development of high blood pressure. I suggest you read the following article:
http://www. Heart. Org/heartorg/conditions/highbloodpressure/preventiontreatmentofhighbloodpressure/prevention-treatment-of-high-blood-pressure_ucm_002054_article. Jsp. ...Read more

Dr. Milton Alvis Jr
398 Doctors shared insights

Atherosclerosis (Definition)

Atherosclerosis is a common disease affecting the walls of arteries. Commonly described as "clogged" blood vessels, it can cause heart attack or stroke even without severe blockages: e.g., if blood clots form on plaques. High levels of LDL cholesterol, diabetes, smoking, high blood pressure, & aging can all contribute to atherosclerosis, but prevention is possible ...Read more


Dr. Steven Busuttil
245 Doctors shared insights

Blocked Arteries (Definition)

Blocked arteries is a condition in which a person has decreased or no blood flow in one or more of his arteries, due to obstructions inside the artery such as thick plaques, floating clumps of broken plaques, blood clots, etc... Severe compression due to a problem on the outside of an artery can also ...Read more