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Doctor insights on: How To Improve Color Blindness

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Can color blindness be cured or improved by any means?

Can color blindness be cured or improved by any means?

Not usually: Congenital colorblindness is static and cannot be improved and will not worsen. Patients with this defect learn to account for their difference in vision over time. Acquired color blindness due to retinal or optic nerve damage can occasionally be partially reversible if the causative factor is removed. Often this is not the case though. ...Read more

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Dr. David Chandler
77 Doctors shared insights

Color Blind (Definition)

Ophthalmologist prefer to use the term color deficit as blindness conveys other meanings. Lowered color perception can be inherited (many forms), can result from advanced loss of retinal cells, inherited retinal disease, and some forms occur due to CNS injury. There are excellent tests for the various types and they can be functionally ...Read more


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What is the rate of occurrence of color blindness in the u.S.?

What is the rate of occurrence of color blindness in the u.S.?

About 8%: The standard statistics for inherited color deficiency is about 7.5% in males and 1/2 % in females. This can vary somewhat with different racial groups. The degree of color deficiency and the type are variable so your ophthalmologist can test you and see in which category you are if that is important to you and also give you information about your family possibilities. ...Read more

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Is it common to develop color blindness in your mid 20's?

Is it common to develop color blindness in your mid 20's?

Rare: Color deficiency is inherited at birth. A few global diseases of the retina and rare strokes of the brain can affect color vision in an adult, but these are rare. ...Read more

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Signs of child being color blind?

Signs of child being color blind?

Depends upon age: Obviously inability to distinguish between red / green colors. Some have trouble with blue/yellow. It does assume the child knows his colors. I am not aware of a condition where no colors are seen. These are usually specific to certain colors. ...Read more

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How to determine if someone is color blind?

How to determine if someone is color blind?

Testing: The most common type of "color blindness" is red-green color deficiency. Blue-yellow deficiency or true color blindness (achromatopsia) are rare. Color testing can identify which. The problem is a lack of certain types of cones or their opsins (light-sensitive compounds). Red-green deficiency can be adapted to fairly easily and is not very limiting, but the others can significantly impact vision. ...Read more

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What happens when you go completely color blind?

No good: If you are progressively losing your ability to distinguish different colors at your young age, you need to seek medical attention. "normal" color blindness is present at birth and not progressive. ...Read more

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What are the different ways to being color blind?

What are the different ways to being color blind?

Several types: There are several different types of inherited color deficiency varying in spectrum and intensity. You can lose color recognition by advanced retinal disease like diabetes or retinitis pigmentosa. Optic nerve disease can change color recognition and there are a few rare cortical strokes that can do this. ...Read more

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What exactly are the different ways to being color blind?

Varied: The most common type of "color blindness" is red-green color deficiency. Blue-yellow deficiency or true color blindness (achromatopsia) are rare. Color testing can identify which. The problem is a lack of certain types of cones or their opsins (light-sensitive compounds). Red-green deficiency can be adapted to fairly easily and is not very limiting, but the others can significantly impact vision. ...Read more

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What is color blindness?

What is color blindness?

Color blindness: Color blindness is a congenital or acquired condition whereby a person cannot see certain colors well because the parts of the eye that receive those wavelengths of light do not function well. For example, some people are born with red=green color blindness. They cannot see the color red or green well. Those colors would look gray or "washed out". Special tests can determine color blindness. ...Read more

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Is color blindness common?

Sort of: About 8% of males and 1% of females have some degree of color perception dysfunction. So it is sort of common but not the majority. It is inherited so the family connection is important and can be traced. ...Read more

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What is color blindness?

Color blindness: Color blindness is the inability to see certain colors adequately. This is an inherited condition (x-linked recessive) that affects men much more than women. The defect is in the retina and involves a problem with color sense in pigment granules. The commonest affect is trouble distinguishing red from green. See your doctor for an examination and proper treatment. ...Read more

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What causes color blindness?

What causes color blindness?

Mostly genertic: In inherited color deficiency, a visual pigment has its spectrum of color reception altered to a small degree and to a large degree in those with high degree of this disorder. The photoreceptor count is the same, so the acuity is not lost - just the color recognition. There are a few less common color vision losses due to advanced retinal, optic nerve and CNS diseases. ...Read more

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How is color blindness treated?

How is color blindness treated?

Not possible: Most color blindness is inherited and permanent. A few are acquired from retinal global disease or a few rare strokes in the brain. No treatment is possible. ...Read more

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Is color blindness reversible?

May be: There two main kind of color blindness one genetic in nature and the other acquired, the genetic one is not revisable, the second in some cases it is. ...Read more

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Color blindness, is this normal?

Not quite: It is "normal" for those who have it. For those with actual normal color vision, it would be abnormal to lose it. ...Read more

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Can I correct my color blindness?

No: I assume you have inherited color deficiency. This is a permanent change in the pigments of your light receptors altering the light detection spectrum. This cannot be improved. The use of a red contact lense is suggested as an improvement, but this merely shifts the axis of the defect to another direction to allow passage of color detection plates but leavers you color blind in new direction. ...Read more

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How is color blindness inherited?

Sex linked: The most common form is carried on the X chromosome and so it manifests more commonly by far in males who lack a corresponding X (as women do) to compensate (males have a sort Y chromosome). It is therefore passed on to a male child from his mother who carries a defective X (and most likely a normal X matching it so she is not color deficient.). ...Read more

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Do color blind people lack cones?

Do color blind people lack cones?

No: Color blind people have a set of rhodopsin light receptive pigments that are shifted in spectrum, giving a narrower range of color perception. Except for a few very rare forms, they have a normal cone count and so their acuity is normal. ...Read more

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Who is at risk for color blindness?

Males: Color blindness is most commonly a genetic condition. It is usually sex linked, and more common in males. Therefore males with a family history of color blindness would be at higher risk. ...Read more

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What's ishihara color blindness test?

Color plates: The ishihara test plates are a series of dots of various colors with an embedded number or symbol which cannot be easily seen by the color deficient due to color confusion. They are the most commonly available test in ophthalmologists office although others are also available and some are better at separating the forms of color deficiency out. Ishihara is a good screening test. ...Read more

Dr. Damien Luviano
61 Doctors shared insights

Blindness (Definition)

Vision impairment and blindness are conditions in which a person cannot see well or see at all, even with glasses or contact lenses. If a person's best vision (with correction) out of either eye is only 20/70 - 20/200, he is impaired. If he can see no better than 20/200 or his visual field is no more than 20 degrees (severe "tunnel" vision), ...Read more


Dr. Tim Conrad
439 Doctors shared insights

Loss Of Vision (Definition)

Loss of vision reflects the inability to perceive images. Such a phenotype can be due to occlusive or barriers to light (e.g. cataracts) through retinal alterations (e.g. wet macular degeneration) to optic nerve lesions (e.g. from a pituitary adenoma) to central nervous system ...Read more