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Doctor insights on: How Long Does The Tuberculosis Skin Test Take

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How long does the tuberculosis skin test take?

How long does the tuberculosis skin test take?

48-72 hours: Any physician can order or apply a TB skin test. A very tiny needle is used to inject the test media, on the forearm. You will need to return in 48-72 hours to have it read. ...Read more

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Dr. Scott Lindquist
587 doctors shared insights

Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Infection (Definition)

Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an infectious organism that spreads by droplets coughed out by an infected person. Infection is established initially in lungs, but can spread within lungs & to other body parts, or can become latent, with reactivation occurring years to decades later. With effective treatment, it can be completely eliminated although drug resistant ...Read more


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Please help me with my positive tuberculosis skin test how lon does it take to heal?

Please help me with my positive tuberculosis skin test how lon does it take to heal?

TB skin test: The reaction from PPD (tb test) can last for several weeks. Did you get a chest x-ray and placed on anti-tb medicine? ...Read more

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If my TB skin test ran positive but i've never had tuberculosis, does that mean I have latent tb? And do I have to take antiobiotics if I do have it?

If my TB skin test ran positive but i've never had tuberculosis, does that mean I have latent tb? And do I have to take antiobiotics if I do have it?

Possible exposure.: If PPD is positive than you need a screening chest xray. If xray negative than 9 months of one med inh should be taken to prevent activation of possible dormant tb. ...Read more

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Is a tuberculosis skin test a shot?

PPD: The standard tuberculin test involves inserting a quantity of a purified protein derived from the tuberculosis germ between the top layers of your skin.It is meant to form a small bleb in this location, typically on a forearm. The process utilizes a small needle. ...Read more

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How is a tuberculosis skin test done now?

How is a tuberculosis skin test done now?

Same as before: Skin tests haven't changed: a small amount of liquid (ppd, or purified protein derivative) is injected under the skin on your forearm. The difference is that there is now a blood test (interferon-gamma release assays, such as quantiferon gold) that can be used in place of the skin test. ...Read more

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Will getting a tuberculosis skin test hurt?

A tiny bit: There is a very brief and mild pain during the injection. ...Read more

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Is it normal to need a tuberculosis skin test?

Is it normal to need a tuberculosis skin test?

Required of some: Public health and safety statutes in some locals require that workers in public venues like the food industry, jails, health care, etc. Show evidence that they do not have evidence of contageous illness. Though not common, the resurgence of multiply drug resistant TB in some populations has kept concern detecting this disease high. If at risk thru work or travel it is to your advantage to be screened. ...Read more

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Could my tuberculosis skin test still be read?

Hard to say: The test is based on readings at 48 or 72 hours more or less. Any further delay changes the conditions by which the borderline tests are interpreted.A grossly positive test will be so large and reactive the site could be accepted as positive for days later, but a borderline or negative could not be established unless the time criteria was met. ...Read more

Dr. Klaus D Lessnau
1,185 doctors shared insights

Tuberculosis (Definition)

Is an infection in the body with mycobacterium tuberculosis. It is almost always acquired via the respiratory tract from which it can spread to other organs. After that, the immune system walls the bacteria off. All of this usually occurs without symptoms. After that, activation of the infection can occur in about 10% of the total patients. Half of this risk is in ...Read more