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Doctor insights on: How Is Lumbar Radiculopathy Typically Diagnosed

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How is lumbar radiculopathy typically diagnosed?

How is lumbar radiculopathy typically diagnosed?

History alone.: The story pt tells the dr gives more that 80% the diagnosis. Pain that comes feom the low back towards the buttocks and then down to the leg. Slightly reduced reflexes on affected side plus possibly some changes in sensation ( pimprick or vibration )confirms it. Usually bladder and bowel functions are preserved. ...Read more

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Dr. Kornelis Poelstra
259 doctors shared insights

Radiculopathy (Definition)

The term radiculopathy is a term used by physicians to refer to nerve pain that follows a particular anatomical distribtuion in the human body. It is most commonly associated with the lumbar spine and herniated discs but can also occur in the neck region and arms. The symptoms are typical pain and number follow a particular nerve innervation and this allows a clinician ...Read more


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Hi doctors, was just wondering how do you get diagnosed for lumbar radiculopathy?

Hi doctors, was just wondering how do you get diagnosed for lumbar radiculopathy?

PM;R physician: Seek out an interventional pm;r (or anesthesia) pain physician. It's really not that difficult to diagnose lumbar radiculopathy, though it takes someone with knowledge of all the other possible conditions that can mimic lumbar radic to know for sure that your pain is actually coming from a pinching/irritation of a nerve in the back. Physical exam and possibly MRI is needed. ...Read more

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I have been diagnosed with lumbar radiculopathy. What are the treatments?

I have been diagnosed with lumbar radiculopathy. What are the treatments?

Many: Initial treatment options include physical therapy, chiropractic care, anti-inflammatory medications, several types of injections, rest and most importantly time. Check out spine-health.Com. ...Read more

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I'm diagnosed with lumbar radiculopathy , but MRI shows nothing , what can I do?

I'm diagnosed with lumbar radiculopathy , but MRI shows nothing , what can I do?

Maybe not then: For true lumbar radiculopathy, there needs to be a pinching or irritation (chemically) of a nerve root in the lumbar spine. If the MRI is completely "clean", then the piriformis muscle may be causing intermittent sciatica. Also depends how far down the leg the pain is going. The lumbar facet joints can certainly cause referred pain down the leg, even past the knee. Check out the image attached. ...Read more

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My neurosurgeon diagnosed and stated I am disabled from cervical and lumbar radiculopathy. He said there is nothing surgical to fix the problems, and ?

My neurosurgeon diagnosed and stated I am disabled from cervical and lumbar radiculopathy. He said there is nothing surgical to fix the problems, and ?

Second Opinion: Surgical recommendations can vary from surgeon to surgeon, based upon experience, training, and proficiency. I would suggest at least getting a second opinion from a surgeon who has done additional fellowship training in spinal disorders before surgery is ruled out. You may also want to look into a multidisciplinary pain management program. ...Read more

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I was diagnosed with Nerve root disorder, Lumbar radiculopathy, chronic, and my pain management said surgery is not needed and nothing more he can do.

I was diagnosed with Nerve root disorder, Lumbar radiculopathy, chronic, and my pain management said surgery is not needed and nothing more he can do.

Second Opinion: Your pain doctor may know much about your problem, but is not a surgeon. A surgeon has different experiences and training, and may have better insight for advanced treatments for which the pain doctor has no first hand experience. I would absolutely see a surgeon for at least an opinion. Surgery is not always the best treatment, but if it is a viable option it should be offered. ...Read more

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I was recently diagnosed with lumbar stenosis, lumbar radiculopathy and spondylothesis. I was recomended laminectomy. I have no pain in the leg, just chronic low basinpain since 2009. Will the laminectomy help?

I was recently diagnosed with lumbar stenosis, lumbar radiculopathy and spondylothesis. I was recomended laminectomy. I have no pain in the leg, just chronic low basinpain since 2009. Will the laminectomy help?

Not likely for back: Laminectomy will help with leg or buttock symptoms. For back pain -- it is not a predictable way of addressing back pain. And with spondylolisthesis (depending on grade of the spondylolisthesis), a laminectomy only may make the back pain worse eventually, and you may have recurrent stenosis if your spondylolisthesis grade worsens. Discuss this with your surgeon, and make sure you are doing pt. ...Read more

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How do you treat lumbar radiculopathy?

How do you treat lumbar radiculopathy?

Lumbar radiculopathy: There are many treatments for lumbar radiculopathy like heat pads, accupuncture, chiropractic therapy, exercise, massage, medications, injections ... Please see a pain management doctor for evaluation. You might benefit from a comprehensive evaluation and treatment. ...Read more

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What is lumbar radiculopathy?

Lumbar radiculoparhy: Refers to disc in lumbar spine bulging or herniating pressing on nerve leading to symptoms of pain, numbness and sometimes weakness in lower extremity. ...Read more

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What are the causes of lumbar radiculopathy?

What are the causes of lumbar radiculopathy?

Causes: Typically either stenosis (a narrowing in your spine), or a disc bulge or herniation, pinching a nerve. ...Read more

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Dr. Chukwuka Okafor
205 doctors shared insights

Lumbar Radiculopathy (Definition)

Lumbar radiculopathy is leg pain, numbness and weakness caused by compression of a spinal nerve as it leaves the spine to supply the leg. This nerve carries the information from the brain to the leg and from the leg to the brain. Therefore, the brain registers pain and a problem in the leg even though the problem is in the back. For example compression of the ...Read more


Dr. Abraham Jaskiel
1 doctor shared a insight

Lumbar (Definition)

The lumbar part of the spine is the low back. It is made up of five bones (most of the time) stacked one on top of the other. They are connected by disks, facet joints, and ligaments. These soft parts allow for movement controlled by the spinal muscles; the muscles can also keep it stiff when need be. The lumbar spine also contains and protects nerves to ...Read more