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Doctor insights on: How Does Alcohol Affect Someone Who Has Aortic Valve Stenosis

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How does alcohol affect someone who has aortic valve stenosis?

How does alcohol affect someone who has aortic valve stenosis?

Heart & BP: Alcohol can contribute to atherosclerosis, which can cause or worsen aortic valve stenosis. .. But more importantly, alcohol can affect blood pressure and heart rate and can make the symptoms of aortic stenosis worse. .. ...Read more

Dr. Qamar Khan
1 Doctor shared a insight

Valve (Definition)

A valve is a structure that regulates the direction of flow. The heart is a special kind of pump. It moves blood by squeezing and relaxing. There are 4 chambers and each chamber has a valve. This keeps blood from moving backwards when the heart squeezes. When a chamber squeezes it lets the blood move forward but when the chamber is relaxed it prevents the blood from ...Read more


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How does alcohol affect someone with aortic valve stenosis?

How does alcohol affect someone with aortic valve stenosis?

Variable: Like any drug, alcohol has its own pharmacologic profile and metabolism with acute and chronic adverse effects possible. If the aortic stenosis is mild to moderate or less, modest alcohol intake may have little to no effect. If the aortic stenosis is severe or critical, then instability of blood pressure or heart rhythm may result and create clinically important problems. ...Read more

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How does alcohol affect a person who has been diagnosed with aortic valve stenosis?

How does alcohol affect a person who has been diagnosed with aortic valve stenosis?

Depends: How much alcohol are we talking about? In low doses (1-2 drinks per day), it would not have much effect, but if someone is short of breath before, it might even improve that. The main effects of aortic stenosis are fainting spells, chest pain and heart failure, and alcohol is not particularly good, esp in higher doses (> 2 drinks/day) for any of those. ...Read more

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How can alcohol affect someone who has been diagnosed with aortic valve stenosis?

How can alcohol affect someone who has been diagnosed with aortic valve stenosis?

Aortic valve: The valve opens to allow flow out of the heart to the body. If it doesn't open properly we call this stenosis. It has to close properly to keep blood flowing in a forward direction. If it doesn't we call this insufficiency. Either or both abnormalities can exist in the valve. Alcohol weakens the heart so is not beneficial with either. ...Read more

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Does alcohol cause aortic valve stenosis?

Does alcohol cause aortic valve stenosis?

No: Aortic stenosis is a condition in which the aortic valve of the heart is narrowed and flow out of the left ventricle is restricted. Alcohol is not one of the causes of aortic stenosis. ...Read more

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My husband has aortic valve stenosis and his chest pain seems to be getting worse?

My husband has aortic valve stenosis and his chest pain seems to be getting worse?

Cardiologist: Need to see your cardiologist stat. An echocardiogram and depending on findings and symptoms perhaps cardiac catheterization may be needed.
If the severity of the stenosis has progressed to critical or if older person concomitant coronary artery disease has developed, surgical treatment inminent. Critical aortic stenosis may result in sudden death, stroke or permanent ventricular injury. ...Read more

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What causes someone to develop aortic valve stenosis?

Congenital, acquired: Bicuspid aortic valves are an anatomic variant seen in 2% of the population. They are prone to develop aortic stenosis. The more common is degenerative or senile which is seen in the elderly. The cause is likely multifactorial and may share some similarity to atherosclerosis. ...Read more

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What does aortic valve stenosis lead to?

What does aortic valve stenosis lead to?

Aortic stenosis: Aortic stenosis refers to the gradual destruction of the aortic valve. It is a progressive process that eventually leads to shortness of breath and lack of energy with exercise. Untreated it will eventually cause congestive heart failure. ...Read more

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What are my life restrictions if I have mild aortic valve stenosis?

What are my life restrictions if I have mild aortic valve stenosis?

None currently: Typically none with mild or moderate stenosis as long as there is nothing else going on, but should be monitored by a cardiologist over time and your individual case discussed. ...Read more

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Could you tell me what are my restrictions with mild aortic valve stenosis?

None: Usually with mild aortic stenosis, no lv muscle thickness (hypertrophy), no ekg changes, and no aortic root dilatation, there are no restrictions. However, your cardiologist is the best person to tell you about restrictions because he has much better knowledge of your whole condition and any other associated problems. ...Read more

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What is icd-9 of aortic valve stenosis?

What is icd-9 of aortic valve stenosis?

424.1: The closest I have been able to find is 424.1, aortic valve disorders. I cannot find a specific code for stenosis. ...Read more

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What is aortic valve stenosis?

What is aortic valve stenosis?

Aortic stenosis: Narrowing of the aortic valve which is located between the left ventricle and the aorta. ...Read more

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What are causes of aortic valve stenosis?

What are causes of aortic valve stenosis?

Multiple: Perhaps the most common offending etiology in aortic stenosis in the us is atherosclerosis. Just as this can affect the arteries in the body, it can affect the tissues covering the aortic valve and then the plaque deposition and calcific degeneration of the valve leads to its problems. Rheumatic heart disease, not common in the us, is another common cause in third world countries. ...Read more

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What can be done for severe degenerative aortic valve stenosis?

Replacement of valve: Surgical replacement of aortic valve is the standard of care. No medicines can relieve the blockage. More recently percutaneous valve replacement has become available for patients who are at a high risk from surgery for aortic valve replacement. This procedure can be performed with a catheter through the groin, but carries its own complicaitons and risks. ...Read more

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I was just diagnosed with aortic valve stenosis. What's my next step?

I was just diagnosed with aortic valve stenosis. What's my next step?

How severe: What is the aortic valve area, your body surface area, aortic valve gradient, tricuspid or bicuspid, if bicuspid what is the diameter of the ascending aorta. Do you have marfan's, ehrles-danlos or collagen disorder. Is there a hypotensive response to excersise. Without all those answers can not advise. ...Read more

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I've been told I have severe degenerative aortic valve stenosis. What can I do?

I've been told I have severe degenerative aortic valve stenosis. What can I do?

Surgery eventually: Severe degenerative aortic valve stenosis generally will require aortic valve replacement at some point. ...Read more

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Is there anything I can do to slow down aortic valve stenosis from progressing?

Not really: Avoid rheumatic fever in childhood
avoid birth with bicuspid valve

it is a slow progressive hardening and calcification of abnormal, or even previously normal tissue.
So there is not much we nor you can do. ...Read more

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I have aortic valve stenosis and am wondering if lifting 10lb dumbbells is bad?

VALVE AREA?: Depends on the valve area, transvalvular gradient, contractility, ejection fraction, left ventricular end diastolic and systolic dimensions, and overall physical conditionig. Need echo findings, blood pressure and heart rate and transvalvular gradients. ...Read more

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If you have aortic valve stenosis can you ride roller coasters?

Depends: It depends on how severe the aortic stenosis is. If mild, there should be no problem. If severe, the stress could cause strain on the heart and lead to serious problems. Usually, if it is that severe, the condition is treated. One should directly consult one's cardiologist to answer this question. ...Read more

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Father is having surgery for aortic valve stenosis. Should I be worried?

A little: Most open heart surgical progras have reported operative mortality of less than 5% and major complications of less than 10%. Greater than 90-95% of the time everything should work out fine.
The average hospital stay is 4-7 days.
If your father is not too sick with many other problems and has decent heart function you cn expect the above results. ...Read more

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Is it safe to ride roller coasters if you have aortic valve stenosis?

Depends on the sever: For mild to moderate stenosis, probably little to no risk. For severe disease, would check with your heart doctor. ...Read more

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If you have aortic valve stenosis is it safe to ride the roller coasters?

If you have aortic valve stenosis is it safe to ride the roller coasters?

Maybe: If it is mild, it would not be a problem. If moderate you would need to ask your cardiologist specifically. If severe, no. ...Read more

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I have aortic valve stenosis. Is lifting 10lb dumbbells bad for my heart and valve?

Depends: It really depends on the severity of your aortic stenosis. If it is mild and you have no symptoms then exercise should not be a problem. However if it is severe and you have symptoms then I would not recommend exercise until you have recovered from your aortic valve surgery. Your best resource is your doctor who can actually examine you. ...Read more

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What are some good homeopathic medicines for calcified aortic valve/ aortic stenosis?

Not first treatment: Homeopathy is not the first treatment to be used in aortic stenosis. Full cardiology evaluation -- and depending on how much the valve problem is impacting cardiac function and the patient's life, possibly surgery -- is required. That said, there are a few homeopathic remedies known to help. But you definitely need a professional homeopath for this. Care should be collaborative w/cardiology. ...Read more

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Bicuspid aortic valve & aortic stenosis. Baby sometimes gets a blue tongue, is there a way to treat this?

Bicuspid aortic valve & aortic stenosis. Baby sometimes gets a blue tongue, is there a way to treat this?

Yes: Bicuspid valve is a relatively common condition and most tolerate until adulthood and valve replacement.
Some are treated in children with valve dilation, open repair or rarely with replacement since so small.
If cyanosis is happening, need evaluation for endocardiac shunting (pfo, asd, vsd) etc. ...Read more

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My mom was diagnosed with aortic valve stenosis by echocardiogram. Will I get it?

Aortic stenosis: The best answer is perhaps. Aortic stenosis is a thickening and calcification of the aortic valve, it can run in families or be due to rheumatic fever or a congenital abnormality of the valve. You should get regular check ups and if a murmur is heard then you should get an echocardiogram or an ultra sound of the heart. ...Read more

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My mom was diagnosed with aortic valve stenosis by echocardiogram. Does she need surgery?

Depends how severe: Aortic stenosis is usually offered for patients with severe stenosis or moderate stenosis and symptoms. Once you reach either of these two levels of disease the chances of survival without surgical replacement is poor. ...Read more

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Bicuspid aortic valve & aortic stenosis & baby sometime gets blue lips and tongue, what to do?

Bicuspid aortic valve & aortic stenosis & baby sometime gets blue lips and tongue, what to do?

Pediatric cardiologi: Who has a bicuspid aortic valve, parent or baby? Take baby to pediatric cardiologist, several to choose in cleveland. Baby needs an echocardiogram, possibly cardiac ct or mri. How old is the baby? Do not waste time, take baby today. ...Read more

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Are there any treatments for aortic stenosis other than surgery or percutaneous aortic valve replacement?

Long term, no: For "critical aortic stenosis" (valve area less than. 7cm2) surgery, and occasionally valvuloplasty is the only curative treatment. Prior to the critical phase of aortic stenosis, the condition is temporized with medications that support overall heart function. ...Read more

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Summary of my resent echogram; 1-Low normal left ventricular function. Ejection fraction is est.52% 2-Mild left atrial enlargement. 3-Mild to moderate aortic valve regurgition. 4-Moderate aortic valve stenosis. 5-Mild tricuspid valve regurgitation. 6-Mode

Summary of my resent echogram; 1-Low normal left ventricular function. Ejection fraction is est.52% 2-Mild left atrial enlargement. 3-Mild to moderate aortic valve regurgition. 4-Moderate aortic valve stenosis. 5-Mild tricuspid valve regurgitation. 6-Mode

Need cardiologist!: There are a number of concerning findings on your echocardiogram. The left ventricular function (how strong your pump is) is just a little low; I'm not that concerned about that. The valves, especially aortic, are the biggest problem: to have both aortic regurgitation (back flow across the valve) and narrowing (stenosis) is very concerning. Follow up soon with your cardiologist. Good wishes:) ...Read more

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Is it safe to use ventolin and nitroglycerin pump to relieve symptoms of aortic valve stenosis?

Is it safe to use ventolin and nitroglycerin pump to relieve symptoms of aortic valve stenosis?

Aortic stenosis: Nitroglycerin is dangerous to use with severe or critical aortic stenosis as it can cause a drop in blood pressure for which the heart cannot compensate due to the obstruction to outflow of the heart through the obstructed aortic valve. ...Read more

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Surgery for valve replacement in someone with aortic stenosis? What are the different ways?

Surgery for valve replacement in someone with aortic stenosis? What are the different ways?

SAVR AND TAVR: Traditionally, surgical aortic valve replacement was the best method for treating significant aortic stenosis. Some patients, unfortunately, were too ill for the procedure. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (tavr) has proven an excellent alternative for these patients.

Talk to your thoracic surgeon and cardiologist to see if you are eligible. ...Read more

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Does xalerto help patients with aortic stenosis, helping this valve problem?

Nope: Aortic stenosis is, in simple form, limestone forming on the valve. Xarelto (rivaroxaban) is a systemic blood thinner, and while it can decrease blood clots, it cannot melt limestone. The only true treatment for aortic stenosis is surgery, to be used when the stenosis is severe enough. Statins have been studied extensively and showed initial promise but that didn't pan out. ...Read more

Dr. Mark Ingerman
3 Doctors shared insights

Aortic Valve (Definition)

The aortic valve is one of 4 valves in the heart, each of which separates 2 cardiac chambers. It opens when blood is actively ejected from the left ventricle into the aorta artery, to be carried to the rest of the body. It then closes firmly to prevent blood from flowing backwards, while it passively continues to flow forward to body's vital organs. When next heartbeat ...Read more


Dr. Roberto Rodriguez
641 Doctors shared insights

Aortic Stenosis (Definition)

The abnormal narrowing of the aortic valve. Progressive narrowing of the aortic valve means the heart must work harder to contract and "squeeze" the blood through a smaller and smaller outflow orifice. This will eventually cause symptoms such as chest pain, dyspnea, ...Read more