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Doctor insights on: How Do You Treat Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome

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How do you treat neuroleptic malignant syndrome?

How do you treat neuroleptic malignant syndrome?

Emergency : The most important thing is to stop any antipsychotic medication. Supportive treatment in a closely monitored setting. Some medications like bromocriptine or amantadine may also be used. ...Read more

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Malignant (Definition)

The term malignant can be used in several medical contexts, but is primarily used to describe cancers. More dangerous and disorderly than the benign growth of cells, malignant cells have developed genetic changes that can allow it to invade other tissues in an unregulated way. These tumors can later spread, or metastasize, to other parts of the body and ...Read more


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What is neuroleptic malignant syndrome? Is it treatable?

NMS: Neuroleptic malignant syndrome is a life-threatening neurological disorder most often caused by an adverse reaction to neuroleptic or antipsychotic drugs (ex: haldol, (haloperidol) droperidol). NMS typically consists of muscle rigidity, fever, autonomic instability, and cognitive changes such as delirium, and is associated with elevated CPK. ...Read more

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Can you tell me how are you supposed to treat neuroleptic malignant syndrome?

Complicated: This should be done by medical professionals. Correct diagnoses is also very important. There are no specific medication. Every case is different. ...Read more

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Which medical doctor should I see to treat neuroleptic malignant syndrome?

Which medical doctor should I see to treat neuroleptic malignant syndrome?

SEEK TREATMENT: Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (nms) is a life-threatening neurological disorder most often caused by an adverse reaction to neuroleptic or antipsychotic drugs. It is imperative to get the right diagnosis and get immediate help. Go to the prescibing physician first or maybe the er if it is too severe. ...Read more

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Do I need to report neuroleptic malignant syndrome as a long-term health condition, or does it go away after being treated?

Do I need to report neuroleptic malignant syndrome as a long-term health condition, or does it go away after being treated?

Yes, let doctor know: Even though a previous occurrence of nms has resolved, it may recur, especially if the causative agent, or one similar to it, is administered again. Let doctor know, so that a similar medication can be safely avoided. ...Read more

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As a psychiatrist, if your client develops neuroleptic malignant syndrome from an antipsychotic they are on, do u treat it? Or refer to someone else?

Yikes: NMS pts don't walk into their psychiatrist's office. They travel in ambulances on their way to ERs and ICUs. NMS is a medical emergency, often fatal if untreated. I can recall only one case I ever saw of NMS actually being treated in an inpatient psych unit rather than a med/surg unit or ICU. ...Read more

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What causes neuroleptic malignant syndrome?

NMS: Neuroleptics (antipsychotics) block certain Dopamine receptors in the hypothalamus (hypothalamic d-2 receptors) resulting in an elevated temperature set point and  impairment of the bodies ability to dissipate heat; it is also associated with blockade of other Dopamine receptors, which can  result in muscle rigidity and increased body temperature.. ...Read more

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Who is at risk of neuroleptic malignant syndrome?

NMS: Can occur in anyone exposed to a neuroleptic/ drug blocker d2 (dopamine receptos). Although it can occur at any time during treatment it is more common after starting the medication or increasing the dose. It is very rare with  an incidence of 0.07-0.2%. Men are at greater risk than women. Other risk factors include  history of nms, increased environmental temperature,  dehydration,  agitation. ...Read more

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Can you please define neuroleptic malignant syndrome?

NMS: Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (nms) is a rare, but life-threatening, idiosyncratic reaction to a neuroleptic (antipsychotic) medication. The syndrome is characterized by fever, muscular rigidity, altered mental status, and autonomic dysfunction. ...Read more

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Dr. John Moranville
339 doctors shared insights

Antipsychotics (Definition)

These are medications used among other things to treat psychosis. There are two poorly named classes: the typicals, because they used to be typically used, and the atypicals, which are now typically used. They differ in that the so called atypicals are non-neuroleptics and interact with both serotonin and Dopamine receptos, while the typicals ...Read more


Dr. Scott Mackinnon
85 doctors shared insights

Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (Definition)

Neuroleptic malignant syndrome is a rare, but potentially fatal, condition that is a reaction to taking an antipsychotic medication. Common symptoms include fever, muscle stiffness, and ...Read more