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Doctor insights on: How Do You Relieve Pain From Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Surgery

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How do you relieve pain from implantable cardioverter defibrillator surgery?

How do you relieve pain from implantable cardioverter defibrillator surgery?

Pain and AICD: Post-operative pain is normal but should not be excessive. First, what is the cause of the pain? If the surgical site is red, swollen, or oozing fluid, contact the implanting physician immediately. The problem could be serious. ...Read more

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Dr. Liviu Klein
58 doctors shared insights

Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (Definition)

An implantable cardioverter defibrillator, or icd, is a small device that can automatically detect abnormally fast heart rhythms and stop them with a rapid pulse of paced beats or a shock. It monitors the heart rate and delivers the treatment through special wires, or leads, that may be attached to the inside or outside of the heart or placed under the skin. Most icds ...Read more


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What happens during surgery of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator?

Sedation: The patient is sedated or anesthetized. Incision is made. Venous access is done. Needle, introducers, and wires are passed to proper position with fluoroscopic - xray control and tested electronically. Then a device nice - the aicd is attached. The wound is closed. ...Read more

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Is an implantable cardioverter defibrillator removed in heart bypass surgery?

Is an implantable cardioverter defibrillator removed in heart bypass surgery?

No: The defib. Device is implatnted in the inner chambers of the heart and bypass is on the out side of the heart where the coronary arteries lie.Unless theres another reason to remove the device ie an infection the device is left in. ...Read more

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I can't decide: implantable cardioverter defibrillator or heart bypass surgery?

I can't decide: implantable cardioverter defibrillator or heart bypass surgery?

Different things: Bypass surgery (CABG) treats the blockages in the heart vessels, while the defibrillator (icd) treats dangerous heart beats such as ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation. A person may need both, depending on their medical condition. ...Read more

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What can be done for implantable cardioverter defibrillator versus heart bypass surgery?

Different indication: Aicd for arrhythmias and ventricular tachycardia and does not revascularize. Bypass for coronary blockage (which can have arrhythmias) to improve circulation and sometimes stops arrhythmias induced by ischemia- low flow. ...Read more

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Is it common to remove an implantable cardioverter defibrillator during heart bypass surgery?

Is it common to remove an implantable cardioverter defibrillator during heart bypass surgery?

No: It was put in for a reason so unless something has changed, it will ordinarily be left in place unless the battery is failing, in which case it would be replaced. ...Read more

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What patients need an implantable cardioverter defibrillator?

What patients need an implantable cardioverter defibrillator?

Ventricular Arrhythm: Patients that have dangerous arrhythmias such as ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation are the usual candidates for an implanted cardio-verter defibrillator or icd. ...Read more

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What are the risks are associated with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator?

What are the risks are associated with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator?

AICD: First of, this is a life saving device for individuals needing one! as this is inserted using surgical techniques, risks associated are bleeding, infection etc... Once implanted the device or leads can malfunction or administer an inappropriate shock etc.. Bottom line: very high benefit (stay alive), low risk. ...Read more

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What is the morbidity rate for people with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator?

Short vs Long Term: Device insertion is very safe, with estimated 2% risk of complications (bleeding, infection). Depending on the person's age and health status, they may have the defibrillator for many years. There is a low risk of infection of device in future (rough estimates of this are single digit to 10%), and risk of getting inappropriate shocks from the device (causing anxiety) is in this rough range as well. ...Read more

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Dr. Melissa Gowans
1 doctor shared a insight

Defibrillator (Definition)

Defibrillation is a common treatment for life-threatening cardiac dysrhythmias, ventricular fibrillation, and pulseless ventricular tachycardia. Defibrillation consists of delivering a therapeutic dose of electrical energy to the affected heart with a ...Read more