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Doctor insights on: How Do Prions Enter The Body

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How do prions enter the body?

How do prions enter the body?

By mouth: These abnormal proteins which can lead to brain degeneration are in food containing brain tissue from affected animals. Herds are checked for this so this incidence is very rare. Cooking does not destroy them. There are probably 1-3 cases of this in the us per year. ...Read more

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How can a prion enter the human body? Through skin? Through your eyes and nose? When you eat it?

How can a prion enter the human body? Through skin? Through your eyes and nose? When you eat it?

Cut skin, ingestion: Ingestion by eating or through broken skin is best established but I would not exclude the possibility of spread through mucosal membranes of the eyes and nose. ...Read more

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What is a prion and what does it do to your body?

What is a prion and what does it do to your body?

Prion: Sub viral protein which infects. Cause of jacob-creutzfeld disease, a dementing illness. ...Read more

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How can prion can cause CNS damage? Is the prion encoded into our DNA permanently?

How can prion can cause CNS damage? Is the prion encoded into our DNA permanently?

Unknown and yes: We all have the prion protein in our dna. Its normal function is unknown. Problems occur when something causes this protein to misfold. Misfolded prion protein may induce normally folded prion proteins to also misfold. It is unknown how many misfolded prion proteins are needed to cause disease. Recent research suggests misfolded prions may shut down protein synthesis. Nature 2012, 1476-4687. ...Read more

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Are Prions the only free-roaming infectious disease? Are Toxins free roaming also? I imagine the body records everything that 1 is exposed 2?

Unclear: Prions, which are microscopic protein particles, are not free roaming. Infection by then is very rare and has been primarily associated with contaminated beef, monkey and other exotic animals. Mad cow disease, kuru, and Jacob Kreutzfeldt disease are the most well defined illnesses. I do not understand your question about the body's recording. Do not concern yourself. Or avoid beef and other meats ...Read more

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If prions are not alive and have no DNA how could we tell if they are damaging nerve cells in the brain and body and what causes prions to damage us?

If prions are not alive and have no DNA how could we tell if they are damaging nerve cells in the brain and body and what causes prions to damage us?

Change in shape: Prions appear to damage cell proteins by twisting them into unnatural configurations that accumulate in the cells and disrupt normal function. ...Read more

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How do prions work?

How do prions work?

Not clear: Prions are duplications of Amino Acid chains that populate the brain and crowd out the normal brain components, causing gradual dementia and motor changes and eventually death. There is no known cure. ...Read more

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What conditions are caused by a prion?

What conditions are caused by a prion?

Slow viruses: Proto-typical disorder include spongiform encephalopathies such as Jakob-Creuzfeldt disease, but also mad cow disease and Kuru. ...Read more

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Can you get prions from cold hot dogs?

Can you get prions from cold hot dogs?

Not temp: It's a good question. Many bacterially affected food can be made safe by high temperature. Not so for prion infected meat. This means that whether cold or hot, badly prion infected meat cannot be made safe by heating. The good news is that prion-dangerous beef is exceedingly rare, whether processed or butchered. ...Read more

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Are prions implicated in any human illness?

Yes: Traditionally classified human prion diseases include creuztfeld-jakob diseases (cjd), gerstmann-straussler-scheinker (gss) disease, fatal familial insomnia and kuru. Certain animal prion disease can be transmitted to humans including bovine spongifrm encephalopathy (mad cow disease), chronic wasting disease of mule deer and elk, and scrapie in sheep and goats. ...Read more

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Can someone please explain what a prion is?

Can someone please explain what a prion is?

The term prion: Is derived from "proteinaceous infectious particle". Prions are the infection agent responsible for several neurodegenerative diseases which can infect mammals (to include humans). ...Read more

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How many known "species" of prions are there?

How many known "species" of prions are there?

Tough question: There are about two dozen known prion diseases caused by more or less distinct prions. Yet the underlying prions do fal, into two large classes. Then there are normal prion type proteins found throughout the body and in the brain. The truth is that this is afield of such new and active research that a solid taxonomy has not yet been developed (so far as I know). ...Read more

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What is necessary for the replication of a prion?

The abnormal protein: Doesn't replicate per se, it produces more of itself by changing the conformation (folding) of the normal cellular protein. These misfolded proteins then begin to agglutinated into plaques which can damage the nerve cell. ...Read more

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Can you tell me, are prions transmitted this way?

Can you tell me, are prions transmitted this way?

Prion: Prion is translated from the words Transmission & Infection. Its replication is responsible for Neurodegenerative disease. ...Read more

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What's the difference between a plasmid from a prion?

What's the difference between a plasmid from a prion?

Benefit provided: A plasmid is a small, self-replicating segment of bacterial dna (chromosome) that exists only within a cell and are usually of benefit to the bacteria. A prion is a protein that is considered infectious, specifically increasing the number of proteins that become like itself: they can convert proteins to prion status. ...Read more

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Can you tell me, are prions transmissible in any way?

Can you tell me, are prions transmissible in any way?

YES: Classically, ingested by consumption of body parts from infected host (Mad Cow disease), but have been transmitted by organ transplantation (corneal implants), and even via blood borne infection. Immune suppression may enhance infection risk. ...Read more

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Please tell me, could prions be transmitted this way?

???: What are you asking? And why? We are unable to help unless you are specific. ...Read more

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What is a prion made of, and what happens when it gets inside you?

What is a prion made of, and what happens when it gets inside you?

Protein frags: Prions are very small proteins, often described as protein fragments because they are too small to have once been thought as having any bio function. So, like proteins, they are strings of amino acids. High concentrations of certain abnormal prions can replicate themselves and cause illness (as colleagues have described). But normal prions are found throughout the body. ...Read more

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Do all cows have a small amount of prions, or do only some cows have them?

Do all cows have a small amount of prions, or do only some cows have them?

No: Only those particular animals which have bovine spongiform encephalopathy like "mad cow disease" are infected. These animals are typically destroyed and not used for human or other animal consumption to prevent disease spread. ...Read more

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Describe prion diseases?

Describe prion diseases?

Rare diseases: Prion diseases are rare disorders that the effected and transmitted by misfolded proteins. Read the site below for more information.
http://ghr. Nlm. Nih. Gov/condition/prion-disease. ...Read more

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Is altzheimer's a prion disease?

Is altzheimer's a prion disease?

Alzheimer dementia: Can show plaques in the brain that can stain similarly to those in prion diseases but are not clearly the same sort of protein. ...Read more

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How does the prion get energy?

How does the prion get energy?

See below: Prions are abnormally folded proteins and per se do not need energy. The energy needed to make the precursor proteins is provided by the affected cells. ...Read more

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How common are prion diseases?

Not very: Hi, the most common prion disease is CJD, with a uniform incidence of approximately 1 case per million population both in the United States and internationally. Familial forms of prion diseases, such as GSS and fatal familial insomnia (FFI), are much more rare. About 10% of cases of CJD are familial, with an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance linked to mutations in the PRNP gene. ...Read more

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How are prions related to viruses?

How are prions related to viruses?

Infections: Prions and viruses can be transmitted from person to person, animal to animal. That is the only characteristic that is in common between viruses and prions. Viruses have typical genetic material, either dna or rna, and work with the host cell's own genetic machinery. Prions are abnormal proteins that encourage abnormal folding of proteins in the host. ...Read more

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How do prions multiply without nucleic acids?

How do prions multiply without nucleic acids?

Structure change: Prions are abnormally folded versions of normal proteins. When a prion comes into contact with the "normal" version of itself, it changes the normal protein's structure into a prion. ...Read more

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How do viruses and prions differ from each other?

How do viruses and prions differ from each other?

Chemically different: Prions are proteins. Viruses are nucleic acids - genetic information (rna viruses, dna viruses). ...Read more

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What is the difference between amyloid and prion?

What is the difference between amyloid and prion?

Protien vz dna/rna: Amyloid is a protein found in the brain associated with neurodegenerative conditions. A prion is a dna or RNA infective agent that can cause diseases. ...Read more

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What is the definition or description of: Prion diseases?

Prion: An infection agent consisting only of protein. They behave in very much as slow viral infections do clinically. Many are neurodegenerative; think mad cow disease, scapie, there are others. ...Read more

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Could you still get aspiration from a gastronomy, enteral?

Yes: Some people may continue to aspirate while on G tube. Those patients may benefit from Jejunostomy tube ...Read more