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Doctor insights on: How Do I Treat Nerve Damage In The Shoulder Without Going To Physical Therapy

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Dr. Olav Jaren
1,292 doctors shared insights

Nerve Damage (Definition)

A complete nerve transection will leave an area totally numb. The distribution of the numbers depends upon where the nerve was cut. A partial nerve injury may leave the area tingly or incompletely numb. Finally even if the nerve is not cut the swelling and bruising to the tea can affect the nerve as well. Usually we consider sharp penetrating injuries as likely having nerve lacerations when sensation is lost. A hand surgeon can examine the hand and pinpoint the site or extent of nerve injury and recommend ...Read more


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What kind of physical therapy should I do for cervical spine nerve damage?

What kind of physical therapy should I do for cervical spine nerve damage?

What kind/level?: First see a rehab doctor or neurologist to be sure physical therapy won't be dangerous. If it isn't serious you are likely to need strengthening of any affected muscles with neck and arm range of motion. Cervical traction is useful for some disc ruptures. Again see the doctor first. You might have something that could cause paraplegia or a tumor or a disc needing surgery or epidural injections. ...Read more

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Three months ago I developed nerve damage from statin use (one month of simvastin 20mg/day). Daily physical therapy has helped a bit, and I just started taking cymbalta to control the nerve pain. Anyone have suggestions for quicker improvement?

Three months ago I developed nerve damage from statin use (one month of simvastin 20mg/day). 

Daily physical therapy has helped a bit, and I just started taking cymbalta to control the nerve pain.   

Anyone have suggestions for quicker improvement?

Acupuncture: Acupuncture helps the body heal without medications. It can also reduce pain. Also you can get homeopathic hypericum 30c or 200c and take that . It hold help with the pain as well. Chinese medicine can alas help your cholesterol problem. Good luck! ...Read more

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2nd opinion for spinal accessory nerve damage had surgery in jan.To remove a branchial cleft cyst and have damage to spinal nerve, had nerve test done and was told physical therapy and see what happens after 3 months. Should i get a second opinion or wha

2nd opinion for spinal accessory nerve damage had surgery in jan.To remove a branchial cleft cyst  and have damage to spinal nerve, had nerve test done and was told physical therapy and see what happens after 3 months. Should i get a second opinion or wha

The : The spinal accessory nerve, also known as "cranial nerve xi" (xi meaning "eleven") is a nerve in the region of the neck that moves two important muscles: the trapezius and the sternocleidomastoid. The trapezius is the muscle that (among other things) shrugs the shoulder. The sternocleidomastoid is a muscle that (among other things) tilts the head. These are important functions, and damage to the nerve can be significant depending on other circumstances. While most peripheral nerve injuries do get better, especially with physical therapy, some do not. Even if recovery is incomplete, there may be no reduced ability to perform routine activities. Loss of ability is a concept that is relative: a graphic artist might have different demands for those muscles than a circus performer, for example. The decision to get a second opinion is often based on the severity of problems, the complexity of problems, or the degree of trust in the competency of the physician or surgeon who offered the first opinion. Most doctors welcome the decision of a patient to get a second opinion, particularly if the stakes are high. ...Read more

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Should I get a nerve block and physical therapy for a frozen shoulder?

Should I get a nerve block and physical therapy for a frozen shoulder?

PT: Physical therapy is the cornerstone of treatment, in resistant cases localize steroid injection or even manipulation under anesthetic may become necessary remember the less you move your shoulder the worse the pain. ...Read more

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I've been using physical therapy to treat frozen shoulder. Does anyone recommend seeing a chiropractor as well? Pros? Cons?

I've been using physical therapy to treat frozen shoulder. Does anyone recommend seeing a chiropractor as well? Pros? Cons?

Watch this video: Adhesive capsulitis is, at its core, an inflammatory process. While chiropractic treatments can be complementary and facilitate pain relief, treating the inflammation gets to the root problem. Watch this video (http://youtu.Be/h-umxi8yi0e) for a complete discussion of the causes of and treatment of adhesive capsulitis. ...Read more

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I was in MVA. MRI shows Rotator cuff tear, labra tear and tendinitis on shoulder. EMG shows pinched nerve. Will Physical Therapy help and how long?

I was in MVA. MRI shows Rotator cuff tear, labra tear and tendinitis on shoulder. EMG shows pinched nerve. Will Physical Therapy help and how long?

Can't answer w/o inf: The space here is limited to provide a good answer to your question. You should speak to an Orthopedic Surgeon or sports medicine doctor (rehab?) to answer this question. Generally, rest, ice, & compression is used to help support healing. Anti-inflammatories like Tylenol (acetaminophen) could be used also. Later on, rehab is used when healing has started but timing is up to the surgeon. ...Read more

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My mother has neuropathy in both feet and pain that shoots up her legs at night, very painful, has tried accupunture physical therapy and nothing help?

My mother has neuropathy in both feet and pain that shoots up her legs at night, very painful, has tried accupunture physical therapy and nothing help?

Neuropathy: There are several causes of this type of pain. Your mother should be examined for the cause of the pain and then proper treatment can be given. Treating the cause is the best way to find relief of the pain. ...Read more

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Dr. Sam Markzar
759 doctors shared insights

Neuropraxia (Definition)

Neuropraxia is defined as a temporary loss of function of the nerve. Some nerves are purely sensory while others carry both sensory and motor fibers. Traumatic contusion injuries to nerves or nerve compressions can cause Neuropraxia. Sensory nerves like sural nerve in the leg or mixed sensory and motor nerves like the median and ulnar nerves in the forearm & hand ...Read more


Nerve (Definition)

The brain and spinal cord communicates with what is occurring in the internal organs and limbs by nerve fibers where are like electrical wires with insulation (myelin) and the "copper" (axon). Within brain and spinal cord these nerves connect to other nerves via synapses on both axons and dendrites. A nerve can carry information regarding sensations, and ...Read more