Top
10
Doctor insights on: How Are The Lungs Protected From Bacterial Infection

Share
1

1
How are the lungs protected from bacterial infection?

How are the lungs protected from bacterial infection?

Nose: The cilia in the nasal passages are the first line of defense. The lung itself has macrophages that also destroy invasive bacteria. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer

Lung (Definition)

Deoxygenated blood enters the lungs from the right side of the heart and travels to the lungs. When you inspire, oxygen flows into the lungs, transverses the capilliares and attaches to hemoglobin down a gradient. At the same time, co2 diffuses into the capilaries and is expelled with exhalation. Oxygen rich blood then flows to the left side of the heart and into the ...Read more


2

2
What causes lung bacterial infection I am a non smoker?

What causes lung bacterial infection I am a non smoker?

Bacteria!: By definition, bacteria cause bacterial lung infection. Bacteria respond to antibiotics while viruses do not. Viruses are more common than bacteria & cause typical cold which won't respond to antibiotics. Average cough illness lasts 18 days so be patient. Best way to avoid upper respiratory infections (uris) is to wash hands & avoid being sneezed/coughed upon. And don't smoke (which you aren't). ...Read more

See 2 more doctor answers
3

3
How alveloe in lungs fills with fluid by bacterial infection during pneumonia ?

How alveloe in lungs fills with fluid by bacterial infection during pneumonia ?

Pneumonia: The fluid filling the alveolus, secondary to infection, is quite simply pus/ purulence that develops as white blood cells kill the infectant. A good amount of damage to alveolar cells also occurs due to proteins released from white blood cells designed to recruit more cells to area of infection, creating breaks in cell lining. This causes increased swelling/ fluid leak into air spaces. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
4

4
What's the difference between bacterial pneumonia and a bacterial infection of the lungs?

What's the difference between bacterial pneumonia and a bacterial infection of the lungs?

Not much: Pneumonia is usually used to refer to an infection in the clusters of breathing sacs in the lung. I suppose you could say a bacerial infection of the entry of the lung (tracheitis) could be defined better that way but I have never used it that way.To me they would seem to mean the same thing. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
6

6
Is amoxicillin good for a bad cough and bacterial infection in my lungs and/or chest?, had cough for 2 weeks, on amoxicillin for 2 days now.

No: A bacterial infection in the lungs would be pneumonia. Amoxicillin would not be a good choice for this because many of the bacteria that cause pneumonia are resistant to amoxicillin. A quinolone like levoquin, a tetracycline like Doxycycline or a combination of a cephalosporin like vantin or Ceftin (cefuroxime) plus zithromax would all be effective for community acquired bacterial infection. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
7

7
An X-ray said i had a slightly collapsed lung , my gp said just a bacterial infection , to repeat X-ray in 6 weeks i was not given any medication ?

An X-ray said i had a slightly collapsed lung , my gp said just a bacterial infection , to repeat X-ray in 6 weeks i was not given any medication ?

Viral?: Viral infections are not treated with antibiotics and treatment of a bacterial infection would depend on the bacteria causing the problem. Partial atelectasis, or a slightly collapsed area of lung, is a common finding on xray. Followup chest xray is a good way to make sure it resolves or doesn't get worse. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
10

10
What are common bacterial infections?

What are common bacterial infections?

Too many to name: There are many, many bacterial infections. Every part of your body is subject to bacterial infection, and the fact that you are not sick from infections all the time, that fact that you survive at all, is a testament to how miraculous the immune system is. There are bacteria everywhere you go. Some bacteria are likely to cause infection, most are not. We are surrounded, and yet we survive. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
Dr. Jeffrey Wint
9 doctors shared insights

Infection (Definition)

Infections are invasions of some other organism (fungus, bacteria, parasite) or viruses into places where they do not belong. For instance, we have normal gut bacteria that live within us without causing problems; however, when those penetrate the bowel wall and enter the bloodstream, ...Read more


Dr. Heidi Fowler
2,013 doctors shared insights

Bacterial Infections (Definition)

Bacteria are tiny organisms that can only be seen with a microscope. When certain bacteria enter the body, they can cause infections that must ...Read more