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Doctor insights on: Hepaatic Encephalogy

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What is acute disseminated encephalo myelitis?

What is acute disseminated encephalo myelitis?

ADEM: Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is a rare autoimmune disease affecting the brain & spinal cord, damaging the myelin & destroying the white matter. Symptoms are similar to Multiple sclerosis. It usually follows viral infection or vaccination. Symptoms start with fever, headaches, drowsiness, seizures. ...Read more

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Has anyone survived hepatic encephalopathy?

Has anyone survived hepatic encephalopathy?

Sure !: The encephalopathy can be treated by the treatment of liver failure and depeding on the cause and the state of the disorder can be reversed. ...Read more

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What is hepatic encephalopathy?

Hepatic encephalopat: Hepatic encephalopathy is a condition of confusion or altered alertness due to inhibition of brain function. It is believed that this is related to insufficient metabolism of the liver and build up of chemicals that can be transmitted to the brain by the blood stream. In some cases, an elevated blood ammonia level correlates with this condition, but not always, and the role of ammonia is debated. ...Read more

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What is acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (adem)?

What is acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (adem)?

ADEM: A rare inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. Is an autoimmune disease triggered by infection or vaccination. It starts with fever, headache & vomiting, then decrease consciousness & sometimes coma or seizures, muscle weakness & ataxia. ...Read more

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Whats the difference between hepatic encephalopathy and portosystemic encephalopathy?

Whats the difference between hepatic encephalopathy and portosystemic encephalopathy?

Hepatic encephalop: These are essentially the same. Portosystemic encephalopathy may occur in fulminant hepatitis caused by viruses, drugs, or toxins, but it more commonly occurs in cirrhosis or other chronic disorders when extensive portosystemic collaterals have developed as a result of portal hypertension due to the changes in the liver structure. It may also occur after portocaval shunts. ...Read more

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Is bovine spongiform encephalopathy infectious?

Is bovine spongiform encephalopathy infectious?

W/intimate contact: Transmission of bse (mad cow disease) requires ingestion or perhaps contact with broken skin or mucous membranes. ...Read more

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Whats wernicke encephalopathy?

Whats wernicke encephalopathy?

Deficiency of B1: It is a neurologic syndrome caused by a deficiency of vitamin b1. It is mostly confined to those with severe malnutrition, classically patients with alcoholism. It damages areas of the brain concerned with balance, eye movements and memory so those with the syndrome have difficulty walking ( ataxia) memory problems, and ey movement abnormalities. ...Read more

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What exactly is acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (adem)?

What exactly is acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (adem)?

Childhood illness: Occurs in childhood, and typically monophasic, but could be confused with MS in some cases. Typically follows viral infection or vaccination and can result in diffuse encephalopathy. Classic MRI findings of large white matter lesions which light up with contrast help confirm. Typically does NOT recur. ...Read more

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What is spongiform encephalopathy?

What is spongiform encephalopathy?

Mad cow (prion) dis: The brain in prion disease shows large distended vacuoles (bubbles) to the extent that under the microscope, the vacuoles are empty, giving the brain an appearance that is reminiscent of a sponge (or swiss cheese, for that matter). ...Read more

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Can transmissible spongiform encephalopathy be contracted?

Can transmissible spongiform encephalopathy be contracted?

Yes: Transmissible spongiform encephalopathy is caused by an infectious protein called prion. It can be transmitted through blood products or eating contaminated food or inflected organs such as brains. ...Read more

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Which are more effective in your opinion: transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt(tips) vs tranditional portal systemic shunt?

Which are more effective in your opinion: transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt(tips) vs tranditional portal systemic shunt?

Both: Both are effective. The benefit of TIPS is that it is done fairly noninvasively - with a traditional portocaval shunt the operation is bigger. Most have now gone away from doing surgical shunts in favor of the TIPS procedure. TIPS can be very effective in treating ascites (fluid) and varices (dilated veins in the esophagus). ...Read more

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What is a brain with spongiform encephalopathy?

What is a brain with spongiform encephalopathy?

Prion disease: There are a group of degenerative brain disease that start as a subacute loss of brain function, with dementia, progressing to coma and death. These disease show by a loss of cells in the brain, but no evidence of inflammation. The brain has a "swiss cheese " under the microscope, they are called spongiform encephalopathies because of this. They are caused by infectious particles called prions. ...Read more

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Is wernicke encephalopathy a disability?

Is wernicke encephalopathy a disability?

Disability?: Yes, it can become a disability if not treated quickly. However, rapid diagnosis and treatment can lead to full recovery -- supposing the person is also able to maintain healthy intake of nutrients after the crisis. (and not go on drinking alcohol, if that's what precipitated the problem to begin with). ...Read more

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Define?accute anteroseptal myocardial infarction, atherosclerotic obstructive coronary artery disease, pulmonary edema, cardiogenic shock, hypokalemia

Define?accute anteroseptal myocardial infarction, atherosclerotic obstructive coronary artery disease, pulmonary edema, cardiogenic shock, hypokalemia

Here are some...: A 400-letter space is impossible to address many indicated subjects as questioned here. Why not type in the terms as keywords to search online? Thereby you surely gain a lot of pertinent information to feed your appetite of knowledge. Or you may just ask your doc who should be able to answer your questions to the point much easier. ...Read more

Dr. Alan Ali Dr. Ali
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How does brain dysfunction occur in patient with hepatic encephalopathy?

Dr. Alan Ali Dr. Ali
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How does brain dysfunction occur in patient with hepatic encephalopathy?

Hepatic encephalopat: Nitrogenous waste products accumulate in the systemic circulation, such as Ammonia, which crosses the blood-brain barrier and is absorbed by brain cells which use ammonia to form Glutamine, which cause swelling of brain cells. ...Read more

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What is the pathophysiology of hepatic encephalopathy?

What is the pathophysiology of hepatic encephalopathy?

Toxins in bloodstrea: Bacteria in the colon release toxins as part of their normal digestion of nutrients. Typically a normal functioning liver can handle that. When someone has cirrhosis and the liver doesn't work normally those toxins can build up and get into the brain to cause the sleepiness/confusion of hepatic encephalopathy. That is why we use drugs like lactulose for diarrhea to clear the colon. ...Read more

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Wernicke encephalopathy disability treatable?

Wernicke encephalopathy disability treatable?

Yes: If diagnosed before permanent damage the disease is easily treatable with b1 vitamin supplementation. ...Read more

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What is best anticonvulsant in ptn. With hepatic encephalopathy?

What is best anticonvulsant in ptn. With hepatic encephalopathy?

??PTN: I don't know what you mean by ptn. However, hepatic encephalopathy generally refers to the confusion that patients with cirrhosis develop. The sick liver is unable to clear toxins which then affect the brain. The patient will experience memory difficulties, difficulty with sleep, alterations in personality, and at its worse, it can cause coma. ...Read more

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