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Doctor insights on: Hemolytic Anemia Jaundice

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Is autoimmune hemolytic anemia hereditary?

Is autoimmune hemolytic anemia hereditary?

No: It can be due to an underlying autoimmune disorder, such as lupus or rheumatoid arthritis. In this case, the underlying autoimmune disorder may be hereditary; but the autoimmune hemolytic anemia is not hereditary. It is simply the manifestation of the underlying disorder. There are also several causes of autoimmune hemolytic anemia that are not inherited. ...Read more

Jaundice (Definition)

Jaundice is the accumulation in the body of bilirubin. Normally it is excreted by the liver, via the bile. For a lot of different reasons, sometimes the bilirubin can accumulate. The most common reasons are a problem with the liver or the bile duct. This can make the skin and/or the whites of the eyes turn yellow. If this occurs, see your ...Read more


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Can Hemorrhagic gastritis precipitate hemolytic anemia.

Can Hemorrhagic gastritis precipitate hemolytic anemia.

Yes: You have to figure out why you are bleeding into your stomach and if there are any other places where you are bleeding and why and if you are making sufficient replacement blood and if not why not. This can be orchestrated, at least at first by your doc, and if things get really messy by a hematologist. Good luck! ...Read more

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How is autoimmune hemolytic anemia diagnosed?

How is autoimmune hemolytic anemia diagnosed?

Bloodwork: An examination may reveal an enlarged spleen. Tests include: direct coombs' test hemoglobin in the urine indirect coombs' test red blood cell count and serum hemoglobin reticulocyte count serum bilirubin levels serum haptoglobin. ...Read more

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Does autoimmune hemolytic anemia affect WBC ?

Does autoimmune hemolytic anemia affect WBC
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Not usually: It depends on the type of autoimmune disorder. In most cases autoimmune hemolytic anemia does not affect WBC. But some autoimmune disorders like SLE may cause hemolytic anemia and neutropenia as well. ...Read more

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What is hemolytic anemia?

What is hemolytic anemia?

RBC breakdown: There are many possibilities that would cause RBC breakdown. Antibodies, abnormal RBC membranes (spherocytosis), abnormal hemoglobins (sickle cell, thalassemia), abnormal RBC enzymes. If hemolytic ane is is suspected, many tests may be ordered. ...Read more

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Dr. Liawaty Ho Dr. Ho
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Does nomochromic normocytic anemia indicate renal impairment?

Dr. Liawaty Ho Dr. Ho
1 doctor agreed:
Does nomochromic normocytic anemia indicate renal impairment?

Not necessarily: Normocytic normochromic anemia can be caused by acute blood loss, early iron deficiency, bone marrow supression, anemia of chronic disease, anemia of renal insufficiency, anemia caused by endocrine problem etc. ...Read more

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Can normochromic or normocytic anemia cause leukemia?

Can normochromic or normocytic anemia cause leukemia?

No: Anemia (normochromic/cytic or not) can be a sign of leukemia (or a variety of other cancerous or non-cancerous conditions). That is it can associated with leukemia. However, it does not cause leukemia. Correlation does not equal causation. ...Read more

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What is Coombs negative hemolytic anemia with large granular lymphocytosis. ?

What is Coombs negative hemolytic anemia  with large granular lymphocytosis. ?

Multifactoral: Coombs (-) hemolytic anemia means that you have evidence of hemolysis (RBC fragmentation) that is not immune mediated. Potential causes include medications, artificial valves, microangiopathic causes, and disorders involving the RBC membrane, etc. Large granular lymphocytosis may be reactive or represent a leukemia if absolute levels are 2-20,000 and sustained for >6 mo in your peripheral blood. ...Read more

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How are aplastic and hemolytic anemia differentiated?

How are aplastic and hemolytic anemia differentiated?

See below: Aplastic anemia is when the bone marrow stops producing blood cells. Hemolytic anemia is when red blood cells are being destroyed outside of the bone marrow. ...Read more

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Ferritin13, Iron167, TIBC496, Transferrin392, %Sat.34, Hemoglobin13.9 Is this anemia or iron overload?

Neither: All laboratory results need to be interpreted in the clinical context and the doctor who ordered the tests is usually in the best position to do that. Having said that, the data you provided suggests that your iron stores at the low end, but you are not anemic.
For good health - Have a diet rich in fresh vegetables, fruits, whole grains, milk and milk products, nuts, beans, legumes, lentils and small amounts of lean meats. Avoid saturated fats. Drink enough water daily, so that your urine is mostly colorless. Exercise at least 150 minutes/week and increase the intensity of exercise gradually. Do not use tobacco, alcohol, weed or street drugs in any form.
Practice safe sex, if you have sex. ...Read more

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Ferritinin 800, iron 167. And macrocytic anemia. Liver , kidney, wbc, platelets, neutrophil, B12 normal. Why? Is it preleukemia?

Ferritinin 800, iron 167. And macrocytic anemia. Liver , kidney, wbc, platelets, neutrophil, B12 normal. Why? Is it preleukemia?

At least 2 problems: You realize that we can't diagnose you. With the very high serum ferritin and up-there serum iron, assuming the blood was not drawn during an acute illness, you have hemochromatosis until proved otherwise. How anemic you are, whether this is real macrocytosis, what your physical findings and other labs are are best known to your hematology consultation. Hope nobody gave you iron supplements. ...Read more

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Is polychromasia typically associated with microcytic anemia (iron deficient anemia)?

Is polychromasia typically associated with microcytic  anemia (iron deficient anemia)?

Iron deficiency is: Usually hypo chromic. Polychromasia is seen in rapidly changing circumstances like hemolytic anemia. ...Read more

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Normocytic hypochromic anaemia causes and symptoms?

Normocytic hypochromic anaemia causes and symptoms?

Early IDA possible: Hypochromic suggests low iron (which can be measured by ferritin, transferrin, etc). Usually this would be from blood loss. Usually iron deficiency anemia (ida) is also assoc w/ microcytic (low mcv) red blood cells (rbcs). It depends on the numbers, other tests & history, but could be early iron deficiency/blood loss &/or more than one process -- eg b12/folate deficiency & ida. See md. ...Read more

Rishi Kumar Dr. Kumar
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Why is iron deficiency anemia a microcytic anemia?

Rishi Kumar Dr. Kumar
3 doctors agreed:
Why is iron deficiency anemia a microcytic anemia?

Decreased Hemoglobin: Red blood cells (rbcs) are essentially little bags carrying lots of hemoglobin (hb). Iron is an important constituent of the hb molecule. Low iron = low hemoglobin = less packing into rbc. Since the RBC is now filled less, a microcytic anemia results. ...Read more

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What causes sickle cell anemia besides malaria?

What causes sickle cell anemia besides malaria?

Malaria doesnt cause: Sickle cell anemia is a hereditary disease caused by a mutation in the dna coding for hemoglobin. Scientists have long known that sickle cell anemia protects carriers from malaria infections, which could be advantageous in certain parts of the world. Malaria does not cause sickle cell anemia. ...Read more

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Dr. Liawaty Ho Dr. Ho
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How serious is iron deficiency anemia?

Dr. Liawaty Ho Dr. Ho
1 doctor agreed:

Severity and cause: Will depend on how severe it is and whether you are pregnant or not. If you only have mild deficiency-you probably don't have any symptom. If severe enough, tired, fatigue, dizziness, chest pain, shortness of breath can be the symptoms. In pregnancy iron is very important for the fetus. It is crucial to know what is the cause. Bleeding? Malabsorption, cancer? Etc- this needs to be found out. ...Read more

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Can hemolytic anemia be prevented?

Possibly: Hemolytic anemia may have numerous causes including toxins, infections, genetic diseases, autoimmune diseases, drugs, certain types of food, etc. So theoretically if you know what the cause is then it can be avoided. Therefore an adequate diagnostic workup by your doctor is necessary. ...Read more

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Is malaria and sickle cell anemia related?

Is malaria and sickle cell anemia related?

Sickle cell Trait: can offer some protective value regarding severity of malarial disease. In a person who has sickle-cell trait – the red blood cells are destroyed prematurely before the Plamodium can reproduce. According to one study “Sickle cell trait provides 60% protection against overall mortality. Most of this protection occurs between 2-16 months of life, before the onset of clinical immunity..." ...Read more

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Dr. Robert Rahimi
386 doctors shared insights

Jaundice (Definition)

Jaundice is the accumulation in the body of bilirubin. Normally it is excreted by the liver, via the bile. For a lot of different reasons, sometimes the bilirubin can accumulate. The most common reasons are a problem with the liver or the bile duct. This can make the skin and/or the whites of the eyes turn yellow. If this occurs, see your ...Read more


Dr. James Ball
90 doctors shared insights

Anemia, Hemolytic (Definition)

A condition in which red blood cells are broken and removed from the bloodstream before their normal lifespan is over. ...Read more