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Doctor insights on: Hemochromatosis Diet Plan

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 is there a special diet I should eat or foods I should avoid for hemochromatosis?

 is there a special diet I should eat or foods I should avoid for hemochromatosis?

Certainly: Red meats are known for iron content in them, so avoid those, avoid foods high in vitamin c, as it increases iron absorption. Foods high in sugar should be avoided, as it increases iron absorption. Avoid raw shellfish.Alcohol in moderation, better off - none. Should eat - nuts, veggies, grains, rice, beans. Coffee and tea are fine if not consumed in excessive amounts. ...Read more

Dr. Arthur Heller
2,585 Doctors shared insights

Diet (Definition)

Refers to all the physical matter humans (like all living creatures) must take in on a recurring basis; only partially for energy. Like all life on planet humans are open systems which keep tearing down their structure & require intake of atoms/molecules from which to rebuild their structure. Intestinal lining cells replaced ~every 3 days. CaPO4 in bones ~every 6 years, ...Read more


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I have been doing phlebotomy for hemochromatosis. I got my ferritin down to 50 then it went back up to 300! why?! do not drink low iron diet

I have been doing phlebotomy for hemochromatosis. I got my ferritin down to 50 then it went back up to 300! why?! do not drink low iron diet

Iron accumulates: In Hemochromatosis, your body absorbs too much iron. Even if your diet is low iron, as it should be, you can still over time accumulate iron in your tissues again since the underlying problem with iron metabolism is ever present.

Ferritin is also a marker of inflammation, and often rises during infection etc. If you have had any such issues lately, it could be a result of that as well. ...Read more

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Could I go into the army with hemochromatosis?

Could I go into the army with hemochromatosis?

No: AR 40-501 Ch 2-e (5) "current or history of metabolic liver disease, including but not limited to hemochromatosis..." No chance of a waiver for that one. ...Read more

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What are some of the symptoms of hemochromatosis?

What are some of the symptoms of hemochromatosis?

A few: Lack of energy, abdominal pain, memory fog, loss of sex drive, heart flutters, irregular heart beat. When symptoms are associated with hemochromatosis, these usually begin in men in their late 20’s to early 30’s. In women, symptoms usually start about 10-15 years after they stop having a period due to menopause, birth control pills or hysterectomy. ...Read more

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Could you explain what is hemochromatosis illness?

Could you explain what is hemochromatosis illness?

Iron overload: This is a genetic tendency to absorb iron too readily through the gut, overloading and damaging the organs. Of all the common, deadly diseases that disable and kill young adults, this is by far the easiest to manage by removing blood and thus iron. Consider yourself fortunate. Secondary hemochromatosis is due to repeated transfusions and is more difficult to care for. Glad you're diagnosed. ...Read more

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Hemochromatosis. How do you get hemochromatosis?

Inherited: Inherited disorder of any one of a number of genes that are involved in iron transport and storage. The vast majority of hemochromatosis is type! A point mutation in the hfe gene, (c282y) on the short arm of chromosome 6. ...Read more

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I want to know what's the impact of hemochromatosis?

Get treated or die: It's as simple as that. Common hereditary hemochromatosis is by far the easiest to manage of all the common, deadly diseases of young people. It announces itself as elevated liver enzymes, impotence, an odd skin color, sore joints at the base of the thumbs, glucose intolerance, or whatever. Accept therapeutic phlebotomy and you'll feel much better. If it's missed or neglected, it's deadly. Period. ...Read more

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What is the definition or description of: Hemochromatosis?

Hemochromatosis: Genetic metabolic disorder of the utilization of iron and can lead to tissue Fe deposits which can have serious side effects to those organs, especially the liver. ...Read more

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Is hemochromatosis considered dominant or considered recessive?

Is hemochromatosis considered dominant or considered recessive?

Recessive (sort of): The common genetic defect in the hfe gene for phenotypic hemochromatosis is the c282y/c282y homozygous. However other defects other than c282y can lead to hemochromatosis. C282y heterozgyotes with hhc are though to posses another unclassified defect. ...Read more

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Can hemochromatosis kill you?

Yes: Untreated, it's lethal. If it's unrecognized, your elevated liver enzymes may lead to your being accused of being a secret problem drinker. You'll lose your sexuality, develop arthritis, and eventually turn yellow, bloat up, and die over several years. It's not pleasant. If you are diagnosed with hemochromatosis, be aware that it's the easiest of all the killers to keep under control. ...Read more

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Is the blood dark in hemochromatosis?

No: The color is normal. Brown blood usually means methemoglobin. ...Read more

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Does stress make hemochromatosis worse?

Does stress make hemochromatosis worse?

Maybe: I see that you have this fairly common illness and I hope that you have having it managed scientifically. Physical and emotional stress are rough on the secondary diabetes that often results from hemochromatosis. If there is stress in your life, I hope it is what Selye called "eu-stress" to help you achieve & learn, and that you'll cope with "dis-tress" proactively. Best wishes. ...Read more

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Are hemochromatosis and diabetes linked?

Are hemochromatosis and diabetes linked?

Very much so: Untreated hemochromatosis ("bronze diabetes") will often cause diabetes that will self-cure when the hemochromatosis is treated. ...Read more

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Help docs! My friend has a hemochromatosis?

Glad it's diagnosed: Of all the common, dread diseases, this one is the easiest to manage. I'm going to assume this is primary hemochromatosis not secondary to transfusion for some other lifetime illness. Your friend will be treated with regular phlebotomy and will start feeling a whole lot better in a short time. ...Read more

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How can you naturally treat hereditary hemochromatosis?

Blood donation: By regularly donating blood, one can lower the iron stores in the body. ...Read more

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What is the difference between hemosiderosis & hemochromatosis?

Acquired vs.: Genetic. Hemochromatosis is the result of a mutation in the iron metabolism gene and body absorbs more iron than needed and it gets deposited in tissues and causes disease. Hemosidrosis usually occurs in people who need repeated transfusions of red cells, e.g, sickle cell disease, or thalassemia, the excess iron in transfused red cells deposits in the tissues. ...Read more

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What is the difference between hemosiderosis and hemochromatosis?

What is the difference between hemosiderosis and hemochromatosis?

Hemochrom is Genetic: Primary hemochromatosis is a genetic disorder that causes too much iron in tissues. It can be treated by removing a little blood every week or so. Hemosiderosis is not genetic. Can be caused by alcoholism or having many blood transfusions leading to excess iron in your cells. ...Read more

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What is the difference between hemosiderosis and hemochromatosis?

Iron overload: Both are forms of iron overload disorders with different etiologies and pathophysiology. Hereditary hemochromatosis is caused by a gene mutation and involves deposition of hemosiderin (storage form of iron) in the organs of the body, such as the heart, liver, pancreas, and skin. The two types of hemosiderosis are idiopathic pulmonary and transfusion-related. ...Read more

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Can exposure to core samples in the oil field cause hemochromatosis?

Probably not: Hemochromatosis is a genetic disorder in which the body absorbs more iron than needed. I do not know the composition of cores you refer to, but it is not likely to cause hemochromatosis. You may consult this site for info: http://www. Mayoclinic. Org/diseases-conditions/hemochromatosis/home/ovc-20167289 ...Read more

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My friend has hemochromatosis. He has never had therapeutic phlebotomy. What should he do?

My friend has hemochromatosis. He has never had therapeutic phlebotomy. What should he do?

Depends: Hi. Hemochromatosis can be a hereditary disease from mutations in the HFE gene, or it can be from transfusion dependency (e.g., for various alpha and beta- thalassemias). You can only treat the hereditary hemochromatosis with phlebotomy...you can't phlebotomize transfusion-dependant patients! Clarify what your friend has, and if he is in fact iron-overloaded. Phlebotomy is easy and very effective ...Read more

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What do you suggest if my dad has niemann pick's disease type c and also hemochromatosis.?

Love him: Hemochromatosis is deadly if missed but very easy to manage. Niemann-Pick's C is getting picked up more often. See whether Dad wants to try to get into a study -- your physician can offer guidance. He's fortunate to have a youngster who cares. Best wishes. ...Read more

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Why doesn't anyone know anything about hereditary hemochromatosis (hh) if it is so common? I feel all alone.

Under-recognized: Actually around 1 person in 200 has it, but it often gets missed -- I've seen it enough at autopsy as a "surprise". If you're diagnosed, be thankful that of all the common, lethal disease it is by far the easiest to manage. There's no glamor, ribbon parades, or sad advertisements simply becuase it's so readily manageable with phlebotomy. ...Read more

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Can you tell me how to know if you have hemochromatosis diabetes or bronze diabetes/is there an online quiz you can take?

Can you tell me how to know if you have hemochromatosis diabetes or bronze diabetes/is there an online quiz you can take?

Real testing: Forget "online quizzes". This is the 21st century, and anything less than a real workup by your physician would be playing games with a life-and-death matter. If you have elevated liver enzymes, an elevated serum iron, ferritin, or transferrin saturation, the odd skin color or the arthritis at the base of the thumb, ask a competent physician to work you up ; rx if you have it. ...Read more

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Has anyone had adult pt grow taller from Hemochromatosis? Saw post/study saying it causes that. Not Dx w/ it but is it poss why I'm growing in late30s

Get checked!: I can understand your worries. If you read the study, carefully, you will see that it's possible to be checked to see if that's what is wrong. Please see your doctor and find out, so you can relax. Best, if you get re-measured at a doctor's office who's measured your height before. The only way to found out what's going on is to see a doctor. We cannot give you a 100% correct diagnosis here. ...Read more

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How true it is that hemochromatosis is genetic?

How true it is that hemochromatosis is genetic?

Partly true: The disorder is called hereditary hemochromatosis and it is an autosomal recessive disorder. Meaning it is passed from parent to offspring, people can be carriers of the gene, and you have to have 2 copies of the gene to have the disorder: one from the father and one from the mother. Hemochromatosis is an iron overload which can have other causes than hereditary hemochromatosis though. ...Read more

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What's the pathological physiology of hemochromatosis?

What's the pathological physiology of hemochromatosis?

Iron: 400 characters aren't enough; there are websites, books and journal articles. These folks absorb iron too easily through the gut, and it ends up in the liver, heart, and endocrine pancreas where the atoms generate free radicals that do damage. ...Read more

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Is it possible that hemochromatosis could kill patients?

Yes: Over time, excesses of iron build up in major organs such as the heart, liver, pancreas, joints and pituitary. If the extra iron is not removed, these organs can become diseased, causing conditions like diabetes mellitus, irregular heart beat or heart attack, arthritis, cirrhosis of the liver or liver cancer, gall bladder disease, depression, impotence, infertility, hypothyroidism, hypogonadism. ...Read more

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Is paranoia related to hemochromatosis?

It is possible: Hemochromatosis is a hereditary disorder which leads to iron overload in the body caused by excess iron absorption from the GI tract. The extra iron is deposited in various organs in the body including the heart, liver, joints, pancreas & thyroid glands. Iron can also be deposited in the brain & can lead to cognitive impairment. Depending on the location, it may cause paranoia. ...Read more

Dr. (Liz)Phuong Tran
320 Doctors shared insights

Hemochromatosis (Definition)

A medical condition caused by iron accumulation in the body. It can be the result of underlying hereditary disease or be due ...Read more