Top
20
Doctor insights on: H2 Receptor Blocker Medication

Share
1

1
Is there a androgen receptor blocker that only bind to pituitary?

Is there a androgen receptor blocker that only bind to pituitary?

No: There are ARs found all over the body. It's a type of nuclear receptor, that is, it binds to T or DHT in the cytoplasm and then translocates into the nucleus. ARB's like casodex will block AR's wherever they are. Enzalutamide has a greater affinity, prevents translocation & binding to DNA. You may be talking about LHRH agonists or antagonist for prostate cancer. Firmagon (degarelix) blocks in the pituitary. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer

Receptor (Definition)

An organ, cell or molecule that accepts an outside signal and causes an internal change. Eyes receive light, touch receptors send messages to the brain when stimulated by pressure and estrogen receptors bind Estradiol causing responses of normal breast, ovary and uterus cells to rising and falling levels of the female steroid hormones. Most of the time "receptor" refers to one ...Read more


2

2
Which is the most potent histamine h1 receptor blocker that causes serious sedation?

Which is the most potent histamine h1 receptor blocker that causes serious sedation?

Too many to list: There are truly dozens of h1 receptor blockers, many of the first generation of which will result in sleepiness. The tow most commonly used to treat insomina (which would result in sleeping) are Diphenhydramine and doxylamine. ...Read more

3

3
I'm taking a new asthma medication described as specific to beta 2 receptors. What does this mean?

I'm taking a new asthma medication described as specific to beta 2 receptors. What does this mean?

Beta-2 agonist: You are likely taking albuterol, or some form of it, which specifically targets the beta-2 receptors in the lungs for it's intended effects. These specific receptor medications are intended to treat disease of the lungs, without cross-reacting to beta-1 receptors in the heart. Hope this helps. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
5

5
Do psychiatric medications keep on blocking or acting on receptors after they are discontinued. Are the same number of receptors freed up again ordead?

Do psychiatric medications keep on blocking or acting on receptors after they are discontinued. Are the same number of receptors freed up again ordead?

Not exactly: Vulnerable genes only produce dire effects when the environment triggers them. Psych medications can indeed have a persistent, sometimes permanent beneficial effect after long use (1 yr +) this is because the receptor changes alter signals into the nucleus and these change the proteins that regulate the genes. In effect, they restore gene functioning to "pre-trauma" baselines. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
7

7
Can you tell me about drugs blocking the receptor site (psychology)?

Drugs blocking: which receptor site? Need clarification before this can be answered. ...Read more

8

8
There wont be any dopaminergic receptors as they are blocked by other drugs...is it not the correct answer??

There wont be any dopaminergic receptors as they are blocked by other drugs...is it not the correct answer??

Not necessarily: Drugs that block dopamine receptors do not do so 100%. We need dopamine in our system to function normallly. Dopamine blockers are given to people that have too much dopamine around to decrease the dopamine back to a normal level, not to get rid of it entirely. ...Read more

9

9
What is a drug that serves as an agonist for the 2 receptor used for?

Acetylcholine: It is an agonist for both muscarinic an nicotinic receptors. ...Read more

11

11
Which drugs act on muscarinic and nicotinic receptors?

Which drugs act on muscarinic and nicotinic receptors?

Atropine: Atropine.
For good health - Have a diet rich in fresh vegetables, fruits, whole grains, milk and milk products, nuts, beans, legumes, lentils and small amounts of lean meats. Avoid saturated fats. Drink enough water daily, so that your urine is mostly colorless. Exercise at least 150 minutes/week and increase the intensity of exercise gradually. Do not use tobacco, alcohol, weed or street drugs in any form.
Practice safe sex, if you have sex. ...Read more

12

12
Does the body always build a tolerance to a drug you take, or the receptor it affects?

Does the body always build a tolerance to a drug you take, or the receptor it affects?

Not always: The body does not necessarily build a tolerance to all medications. Some are more prone to this than others, such as pain medications and benzodiazepines (ex xanax). Persons taking these medications long term will usually require more of the medication over time to get the same response. Most other medictaions do not result in building up tolerance. ...Read more

14

14
Could a doctor please give an example of a drug that targets g protein coupled receptors?

Could a doctor please give an example of a drug that targets g protein coupled receptors?

Almost half: This will get you started. The key is to understand what these receptors are. http://pubs.acs.org/subscribe/journals/mdd/v07/i11/html/1104feature_filmore.html ...Read more

15

15
What are the side effects of drugs that block cell receptors for fsh?

What are the side effects of drugs that block cell receptors for fsh?

FSH: I can't answer that until I you give more information about " side effects of drugs that block cell receptors for fsh". If you have not yet discussed this with your gynecologist you should make another appointment. ...Read more

16

16
Name four types of receptors that blocked by phenothiazine drugs for psychosis?

Name four types of receptors that blocked by phenothiazine drugs for psychosis?

Dopamine: Psychosis is due to high levels of dopamine. Not aware of 4 different receptors. Sounds more like a TV show called Jeopardy question.
Maybe you know the answer already? ...Read more

17

17
Can you tell me the four types of receptors that are blocked by the phenothiazine drugs for psychosis.?

Can you tell me the four types of receptors that are blocked by the phenothiazine drugs for psychosis.?

Receptors: Chlorpromazine (the first phenothiazine antipsychotic) blocks more than 4 receptor types: d2, h1, m1, alpha1, alpha2, 5ht2a, and 5ht2c -- and a very small amount of 5ht1a. Other agents also block d2 receptors, but vary in histaminic, muscarinic, and serotonergic receptor effects. These differences relate to differences in side effect profiles. ...Read more

18

18
How may drugs such as beta blockers interact with a receptor and so exert and effect?

How may drugs such as beta blockers interact with a receptor and so exert and effect?

Biochemistry: I suggest you go to Amazon and buy a biochemistry textbook if you really want to know. It's a bit too complicated to answer in 400 letters. ...Read more

20

20
What happens if a certain poison/drug blocks the receptor site for a particular neurotransmitter, is it considered an agonist or an antagonist?

What happens if a certain poison/drug blocks the receptor site for a particular neurotransmitter, is it considered an agonist or an antagonist?

Could be either: We have both excitatory neurotransmitters (such as glutamate, glycine), and many inhibitory neurotransmitters (norepinephrine, acetylcholine, dopamine, serotonin), and some agents can interfere by imbalancing the homeostasis. However, mechanistically, receptor blockers really cannot be considered in either category. ...Read more

Dr. Andrew Seibert
6 doctors shared insights

H2 Receptor Blocker (Definition)

H2 receptor blockers are a kind of ...Read more