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Doctor insights on: Gray Patch Disease Agent Of Green Sea Turtle Virus

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Dr. Larry Lutwick Dr. Lutwick
Internal Medicine - Infectious Disease
45 years in practice
George Washington University Medical School
1

Virus (Definition)

A virus is a small infectious agent that can replicate only inside the living cells of an organism. Viruses can infect all types of organisms, from animals and plants ...Read more


Dr. James Rochester Dr. Rochester
Family Medicine
22 years in practice
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A Grey patch on sclera appeared a week ago. It completely covers from the edge of my iris to inner corner of eye. Could this be a serious disease?

A Grey patch on sclera appeared a week ago. It completely covers from the edge of my iris to inner corner of eye. Could this be a serious disease?

Maybe: Several things are on the list including medications, diseases of the eye as well as other systemic diseases that can cause this. See link below for more info. Best to see eye doctor for eval http://www.aao.org/publications/eyenet/200703/am_rounds.cfm Hope this helps. Best of luck. Dr R ...Read more

Dr. Bennett Machanic Dr. Machanic
Neurology
48 years in practice
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
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What is the name of the disease that results from a dormant virus in the nervous system?

What is the name of the disease that results from a dormant virus in the nervous system?

Perhaps shingles: Herpes zoster virus seems to reside in the dorsal ganglion of the spinal cord and can become active in the form of shingles, but we have learned also plays a direct role in temporal arteritis or giant cell arteritis. ...Read more

Dr. Louis Gallia Dr. Gallia
Surgery - Oral & Maxillofacial
41 years in practice
University of Washington School of Medicine
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Help! need to know if there's truly scientific data that says meniere's disease is a virus?

Help! need to know if there's truly scientific data that says meniere's disease is a virus?

No: Meniere's disease has a number of suspected causes. See http://www.Mayoclinic.Org/diseases-conditions/menieres-disease/basics/causes/con-20028251. It's likely a combination of factors. No proof it is only due to a virus. ...Read more

Dr. Bennett Machanic Dr. Machanic
Neurology
48 years in practice
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
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Can Agent Orange cause Huntington's Disease?

NO: Agent Orange has been implicated in many disorders, but Huntington's is an autosomal dominant hereditary disorder, and NEVER secondary to chemical exposure. ...Read more

Dr. Larry Lutwick Dr. Lutwick
Internal Medicine - Infectious Disease
45 years in practice
George Washington University Medical School
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Is the flu always a disease caused by a virus?

Is the flu always a disease caused by a virus?

Sure: True influenza is always caused by an influenza virus but there are lots of influenza-like viruses caused by other respiratory viruses and the stomach 'flu, not an influenza at all. ...Read more

Dr. Ladislav Volicer Dr. Volicer
Psychiatry - Geriatric
58 years in practice
Charles University in Prague Faculty of Medicine
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Dr. Theresa Redling Dr. Redling
Internal Medicine - Geriatrics
30 years in practice
University of Alberta Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry
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Please answer! what virus causes alzheimer's disease?

Please answer! what virus causes alzheimer's disease?

Not a virus: Ad is caused by an abnormal accumulation of a protein in the brain called beta amyloid. It is not known what starts the disease or how to prevent progression. There are drugs available to slow progression but no cure as of yet. ...Read more

Dr. Martin Raff Dr. Raff
Internal Medicine - Infectious Disease
52 years in practice
University of Texas Medical Branch School of Medicine
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What the difference betwen the newcastle disease virus strains?

What the difference betwen the newcastle disease virus strains?

Newcastle virus: Newcastle disease virus causes a deadly infection in many kinds of birds. In humans, it causes mild flu-like symptoms or conjunctivitis and/or laryngitis. Strains of all viruses vary in some structural components and this may increase or decrease their capacity to cause disease. Strains of NCV have been used in experiments to treat some cancers. ...Read more

Dr. Michael Finkelstein Dr. Finkelstein
Internal Medicine
33 years in practice
Ross University School of Medicine
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Can anyone tell me about Ebola virus disease and how to prevent it?

Can anyone tell me about Ebola virus disease
and how to prevent it?

Ebola: Ebola virus disease (EVD) or Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF) is the human disease caused by the Ebola virus. Symptoms typically start two days to three weeks after contracting the virus, with a fever, sore throat, muscle pains, and headaches. Typically nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea follow, along with decreased functioning of the liver and kidneys. At this point, some people begin to have bleeding problems.[1] The virus may be acquired upon contact with blood or bodily fluids of an infected animal (commonly monkeys or fruit bats).[1] Spread through the air has not been documented in the natural environment.[2] Fruit bats are believed to carry and spread the virus without being affected. Once human infection occurs, the disease may spread between people as well. Male survivors may be able to transmit the disease via semen for nearly two months. In order to make the diagnosis, typically other diseases with similar symptoms such as malaria, cholera and other viral hemorrhagic fevers are first excluded. To confirm the diagnosis blood samples are tested for viral antibodies, viral RNA, or the virus itself.[1] Prevention includes decreasing the spread of disease from infected monkeys and pigs to humans. This may be done by checking such animals for infection and killing and properly disposing of the bodies if the disease is discovered. Properly cooking meat and wearing protective clothing when handling meat may also be helpful, as are wearing protective clothing and washing hands when around a person with the disease. Samples of bodily fluids and tissues from people with the disease should be handled with special caution.[1] ...Read more

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Dr. Eric Weisman Dr. Weisman
Neurology
32 years in practice
St. George's University School of Medicine
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What are the differences between Lyme disease and the west nile virus?

What are the differences between Lyme disease and the west nile virus?

Not much in common: Lyme Disease is caused by borrelia (a bacteria). West Nile Virus is caused by a virus. The former causes a targetoid rash and can infect just about any organ system including the eye, joints,heart, and brain if left untreated. It is transmitted to humans by a deer tick. West Nile virus is transmitted by a mosquito and in most cases is asymptomatic. 20% get rash / fever. Encephalitis is rare. ...Read more

Dr. Romanth Waghmarae Dr. Waghmarae
Pain Management
35 years in practice
Faculty of Health Sciences of the University of the Witwatersrand
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Is there a difference between west nile virus and hansen disease (leprosy)?

West nile virus: West nile virus - is a mosquito transmitted virus that causes encephalitis (brain inflammation). This can cause coma and death. Leprosy is caused by a bacteria that affects peripheral nerves, skin, eye, mucosa -- secondary infections is usually the cause of death. ...Read more

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Dr. Martin Raff Dr. Raff
Internal Medicine - Infectious Disease
52 years in practice
University of Texas Medical Branch School of Medicine
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If you are a carrier of epstein barr virus, can you still transmit the disease?

If you are a carrier of epstein barr virus, can you still transmit the disease?

Yes: Although we are not absolutely certain of all the routes of transmission, ebv is a herpes virus, and as such, once you have it, it is with you for life. Some people shed the virus in respiratory secretions and other body fluids and can transmit it through intimate contact. Infectious mononucleosis has been called "the kissing disease". ...Read more

Dr. Brian Kaufman Dr. Kaufman
Internal Medicine
15 years in practice
University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine
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What kind of viruses and diseases can a lumbar puncture help determine or rule out?

What kind of viruses and diseases can a lumbar puncture help determine or rule out?

Varies: A lumbar puncture is done to evaluate for diseases carried in the cerebro-spinal fluid. These can be viruses such as herpes, west nile, eee, etc. Bacteria can also be present such as strep pneumonia, h. Influenza, and others. This is usually done when patients have symptoms of meningitis or encephalitis. Also, non infectious diagnosis such as multiple sclerosis and others. Go in good health. ...Read more

Dr. Ronald Krauser Dr. Krauser
Internal Medicine - Rheumatology
48 years in practice
Wake Forest University School of Medicine
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Can catching a virus trigger an autoimmune disease in less than two weeks? Help please?

Can catching a virus trigger an autoimmune disease in less than two weeks? Help please?

Yes: Post-viral diseases such as arthritis or certain neurologic issues can occur in less than 2 weeks after infection. ...Read more

Dr. Sahba Ferdowsi Dr. Ferdowsi
General Practice
14 years in practice
Midwestern University Chicago College of Osteopathic Medicine
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If some disease is contagious doesa that mean it has to be caused by a bacteria or virus?

If some disease is contagious doesa that mean it has to be caused by a bacteria or virus?

Both are possible: Both bacteria and viruses can be contagious. Always practice good hygiene. Washing you hands is the best prevention. Wishing you the best. ...Read more

Dr. John Leander Po Dr. Po
Internal Medicine - Infectious Disease
14 years in practice
Drexel University College of Medicine
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Is it likely for a transplanted organ to pass a disease or virus from the donor to the patient?

Most certainly!: Many examples of this scenario: hepatitis b and hepatitis c by both blood and solid organ transplants are examples. Others include hiv, hsv (herpes), west nile virus, balamuthia (amoeba), coccidioidomycosis (fungus), trypanosoma (chagas disease-a parasite), lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (lcmv), staph aureus, salmonela, are only but a few examples of what can be donor-derived infections. ...Read more

Dr. Eric Farbman Dr. Farbman
Neurology
22 years in practice
University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey - New Jersey Medical School
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Can you please explain why some vaccines only work if you have not yet contracted the virus/disease?

Antibodies: The theory behind vaccines is to prevent someone from getting the disease that is being vaccinated against. The way the immune system works for many diseases is that once you have had a disease, your own immune system will prevent you from getting the disease again. Thus you don't need the vaccine any longer. A vaccine allows you to create the necessary antibodies to help you ward off the disease. ...Read more

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