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Doctor insights on: Global Cerebral Ischemia

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Is cerebral ischemia reversible?

Is cerebral ischemia reversible?

Yes : Transient ischemic attack is cerebral ischemia that results in transient neurologic dysfunction without acute infarction. Symptoms last for minutes to 24 hr and is transient and therefore reversible. ...Read more

Dr. Cynthia Thaik
1,926 doctors shared insights

Ischemia (Definition)

Used to describe inadequate blood flow and oxygen delivery to an extremity,an organ ,or brain which ...Read more


Dr. Timothy Wu Dr. Wu
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What is transient cerebral ischemia?

Dr. Timothy Wu Dr. Wu
2 doctors agreed:
What is transient cerebral ischemia?

You mean a TIA: Transient ischemic attack (TIA) is often called a "mini-stroke, " and is considered a harbinger for a full-blown stroke. It can occur as a result of a narrowing in the carotid arteries. Unlike a stroke, TIA symptoms last anywhere from 15 minutes to 24 hours. Typically can present with blindness to one eye, paralysis, or slurred speech. You should see a vascular surgeon immediately. ...Read more

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What is unspecified transient cerebral ischemia?

What is unspecified transient cerebral ischemia?

See below: Am not familiar with "unspecified", but transient cerebral ischemia means diminished blood flow to a part of the brain causing clinical symptoms. Since this can be the first sign of an impending stroke, this needs to be fully evaluated and medication started for prevention. See a neurologist and get this fully addressed. ...Read more

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Are migraines associated with global cerebral ischemia?

Are migraines associated with global cerebral ischemia?

So complicated: In short, no - migraines are not a hypoperfusive state. The old (not correct) understanding in fact was based on the observation that blood flow often increases with migraines. Like all things in the body, our understanding now is much more complicated. There's a complex interaction between the neurons (primary problem) and the vessels and surrounding structures (secondary). ...Read more

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Transient global amnesia treatment?

Transient global amnesia treatment?

Typical no need: Tga, by virtue of being transient, resolves spontaneously without treatment. It is usually thought to be a migraine aura-based mechanism. Do no harm and reassure the person of what they are asking about would be my advise. ...Read more

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Cerebral palsy & mental illness common?

Cerebral palsy & mental illness common?

Behavior cer palsy: Behavioral problems are common in children with cerebral palsy. Child psychiatric disorders were found in 57% of the children, including 28 children meeting criteria for an attention deficit disorder, which was the most common (bjorgaas et al 2012) communication problem was significantly associated with having a psychiatric disorder. Early evaluation for children with CP may prevent severe behavio. ...Read more

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Define?accute anteroseptal myocardial infarction, atherosclerotic obstructive coronary artery disease, pulmonary edema, cardiogenic shock, hypokalemia

Define?accute anteroseptal myocardial infarction, atherosclerotic obstructive coronary artery disease, pulmonary edema, cardiogenic shock, hypokalemia

Here are some...: A 400-letter space is impossible to address many indicated subjects as questioned here. Why not type in the terms as keywords to search online? Thereby you surely gain a lot of pertinent information to feed your appetite of knowledge. Or you may just ask your doc who should be able to answer your questions to the point much easier. ...Read more

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What causes cerebral infarction?

What causes cerebral infarction?

Cerebral infarct: Cerebral infarction, or stroke, occurs due to suddenly decreased blood supply to part of the brain. This is common when a piece of arterial debris or a blood clot lodges in a small artery. The risk factors for stroke are smoking, high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol, high blood sugar, and arterial disease. ...Read more

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Is induced cerebral hypoperfusion reversible?

Is induced cerebral hypoperfusion reversible?

Maybe. Probably.: Cerebral hypoperfusion literally means "not enough blood to the brain." so whether or not it is reversible depends on the cause for the decreased blood flow, and "induced" typically refers to intentionally causing this, such as for brain surgery or diagnostically. If this is the case, then yes, it's reversible. You should ask your doctor for more information rather than "medspeak.". ...Read more

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What is global hypokinesia septal akinesia?

What is global hypokinesia septal akinesia?

Heart: These are words used to describe the motion of the heart when it is looked at under ultrasound. Global hypokinesia means the entire heart is not moving as much as it should when it beats. Septal akinesia means that the wall ofheart muscle that divides the chamber is not moving at all. This usually comes from a previous heart attack. ...Read more

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What is cerebral ischemia? Prevention?

Decreased blood flow: The classic is transient ischemic attack (tia), brief decreased blood flow to a small area of brain which can be the first sign of stroke risk. Blood flow issues may play a minor role in migraine, and low blood pressure may diffusely drop cerebral blood flow. Treat the many risks, diabetes, hypertension, high blood fats, hyperhomocysteinemia, carotid stenosis. Anti-platelet drugs protect. ...Read more

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Cerebral palsy and myoclonus related?

Cerebral palsy and myoclonus related?

Spasticity: CP and myoclonus involve over active stretch reflexes. They are caused by release of these reflexes from higher cortical brain control. ...Read more

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What is lacunar infarct in brain artery?

What is lacunar infarct in brain artery?

Infarct of the brain: Lacunar infarct is a small stroke - death of a small number of brain cells that is caused by closing of a small artery that is supplying them with oxygen. ...Read more

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What is cerebral cortical atrophy?

What is cerebral cortical atrophy?

Loss of brain cells: This is a finding on either a CT scan or MRI of the brain. It is commonly seen in the elderly and can be a normal finding as we age. We tend to lose neurons or brain cells as we get older. This process can be increased with certain disease states such as dementia, infection, or poor nutrition. Typically this finding is coupled with cognitive impairment such as decreased memory or behavior problems ...Read more

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Is ischemic microvascular brain disease related to stroke?

Is ischemic microvascular brain disease related to stroke?

See comments: Are you referring to radiology reading of an MRI of brain? In elderly, often thought that white matter lesions are associated with "microvascular angiopathy", sign of potential atherosclerosis. Maybe potential stroke risk, especially lacunar infarct, but not straightforwards. Your physician needs to assess stroke risk. Spots more likely from migraine or prior injury. ...Read more

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MRI brain results Impression- there is cerebral atrophy with subcortical WMC, consistent wit microangiopathic disease, demyelination, or giliosis?

MRI brain results  Impression- there is cerebral atrophy with subcortical WMC, consistent wit microangiopathic disease, demyelination, or giliosis?

Covering the bases: That signal that is seen in patients who age is seen very frequently. Most of the time it is what has become known as microangiopathic disease or small vessel disease. Demyelination and gliosis come with a more notable history. Gliosis or scarring and demyelination also produces symptoms that MRI is useful for. Depends on why you had the MRI in the first place. The first entity more common than 2 ...Read more

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Does ischemia or thrombosis cause myocardial infarction?

Does ischemia or thrombosis cause  myocardial infarction?

Ischemia vs MI: Cholesterol plaque develops in the heart arteries. Progressive narrowing - usually greater than 70% - can lead to lack of blood flow to the heart muscle during exercise or rest and causes angina or ischemia. Myocardial infarction is due to the rupture of a plaque which causes a blood clot to form (thrombosis) in the artery blocking blood flow to that area of the heart muscle which then dies. ...Read more

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Reversible severe myocardial ischemia 9%,ef 65 % mild infero lateral wall hypokinesia (m,55yr,80kg), what does this mean?

Findings: The first thing it means is that the patient and his doctor need to have a discussion of his status and what further steps if any are necessary. The studies reported above suggest that the patient has coronary artery disease and likely needs diet, exercise, not smoking, medications and perhaps other steps. ...Read more