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Doctor insights on: Gingivitis

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Dr. Arnold Malerman
504 Doctors shared insights

Gingivitis (Overview)

A form of gum disease that causes inflamed gums.


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How does gingivitis go away?

How does gingivitis go away?

With cleaning: Gingivitis is inflammation of the gums, which is usually due to bacteria-containing plaque and tartar at the gum line. Daily brushing & flossing prevents plaque formation. Your dentist will need to physically remove the plaque and tartar. In the absence of bacteria and plaque, the body is able to heal the inflammation. Gingivitis can also be caused by other factors, please consult your dentist. ...Read more

Dr. Arnold Malerman
504 Doctors shared insights

Gingivitis (Overview)

A form of gum disease that causes inflamed gums.


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Is bleeding gums always a symptom of gingivitis?

Is bleeding gums always a symptom of gingivitis?

No: If you are causing excessive trauma to your gums then they will bleed. If your gums are bleeding with normal brushing and flossing then you have gingivitis. Get checked by a dentist. ...Read more

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What are the symptoms/solutions for gingivitis?

What are the symptoms/solutions for gingivitis?

Bleeding gums.: If your gums bleed when you brush, floss or "poke" with a toothpic between your teeth you probably have gingivits, or worse...Periodontitis.
See a dentist right away to assess the need for treatment. Could be simple, or quite complex. ...Read more

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What signs indicate that gingivitis has become severe?

What signs indicate that gingivitis has become severe?

Spontaneous bleeding: Gingivitis is just an inflammation of the gums due to primarily bacteria, untreated, plaque will invade the lower layers of the gums mainly attacking the attachment apparatus around the teeth, bleeding become more often and you are getting into the second irreversible stage of gum disease with bone loss.
Don't wait till it get worse, get them professionally cleaned as often as possible. ...Read more

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How long does it take gingivitis resolve?

How long does it take gingivitis resolve?

Don't give up!: If your good habits at home, i.e. Brushing and flossing, don't reduce the problem, you may have more serious periodontitis rather than just gingivitis. See your dentist soon. ...Read more

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What are the tests for gingivitis?

See a periodontist: You are best seeing a dentist who can examine you and evaluate your gum condition. Signs of gingivitis are sometimes swollen gums and/or bleeding gums also possible bad breath from food particles, plaque or acid products
it is easy to treat in its early stage. ...Read more

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What is really the best way to control gingivitis at home? I've always had problems with it, but there are so many different products that say they fight gingivitis that I don't really know what to choose..

Gingivitis: If you are brushing twice daily and flossing once daily, I would recommend rinsing once daily with a cupful of the green listerine. It has been shown in studies to reduce gingivitis by like 70%. Rinse once daily with listerine for 30 seconds and spit it out. If you continue having gingivitis, ask your dentist for a prescription for chlorhexidine mouth rinse such as perioguard or peridex (chlorhexidine gluconate). ...Read more

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I want to target bacteria that causes gingivitis, not listerine. So are there any recommendations?

I want to target bacteria that causes gingivitis, not listerine. So are there any recommendations?

Oral DNA testing is: The state of the art in bacterial diagnosis. Many dentists connected to the american academy of oral systemic health do this on a regular basis in treating gum disease so that the correct antibiotic can be prescribed. ...Read more

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I once woke up with a lot of blood in my mouth prior to that I was complaining of sore gums. What culd this mean? Gingivitis?

I once woke up with a lot of blood in my mouth prior to that I was complaining of sore gums. What culd this mean? Gingivitis?

Draining abscess?: A sudden presentation of blood in the mouth is often the result of a suddenly draining infection. This is likely a more severe problem than gingivitis so you should get a dental evaluation asap. Good luck! ...Read more

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How I can treat gingivitis?

Gingivitis: Have your teeth cleaned by a dentist every 4-6 months. Brush and floss correctly and thoroughly as directed by your dentist. ...Read more

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How is gingivitis treated?

How is gingivitis treated?

Brush your gums: Most people brush their teeth but ignore their gums. Make sure to brush the gums on both sides of your teeth- even if they bleed. Floss at least 3 times a week to flush food and bacteria from your gums. Your gums may bleed - but that is okay. The gums will 'tighten up' in a couple of days of brushing. Visit your dentist every six months to make sure you are brushing and flossing correctly. ...Read more

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Can you tell what's the best choice of antibiotic for treating periodontitis and gingivitis to be perscribed for a patient?

None needed: Gingivitis and periodontitis are chromic diseases. Antibiotics are used for acute problems
we use antibiotics when we regenerate lost bone in periodontal disease
see a periodontist to treat your problem treating gingivitis takes good cleanup to get the gums healthy again and you learning how to do effective oral hygiene. ...Read more

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Is the treatment for pregnancy gingivitis different than for nonpregnant gingivitis?

Yes: Due to the large changes in hormones during pregnancy, gingivitis is not thought of as a constant but is watched for undo changes. Proper hygiene should be maintained in both conditions, or achieved for constancy in expected results. In a more stable condition outside of pregnancy, hopefully before pregnancy, a good hygiene should have already been established to know that maintenance is present. ...Read more

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What are home treatments to gingivitis?

What are home treatments to gingivitis?

Good oral hygiene: Your best and only defense is regular brushing, flossing and bi-annual dental cleanings. You should brush in the morning and at night for two minutes. Each time. Flossing before you brush is also a good idea. I personally like an ultrasonic toothbrush as well. Follow this up with a visit to your dentist twice a year at a minimum. ...Read more

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How long does it normally take to cure gingivitis?

How long does it normally take to cure gingivitis?

It Happens fast: After a professional cleaning and good homecare for a few days, your gums will return to health. In cases where gingivitis has become periodontitis, your treatment and recovery will be more involved and may take months. ...Read more

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How do you get rid of gingivitis?

Professional care: Gingivitis is caused by a buildup of bacteria called plaque on the teeth and gums. The first step is a professional deep cleaning to remove all the plaque and calculus. Then a good home oral hygiene program is needed to keep the plaque from building up again. Home care consists of effective brushing and flosiing at least 2x/day and a antimicrobial mouth rinse. ...Read more

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Is gum disease genetic? Can our children have it if a blood family member has it?

Possible predisposed: Genetic predisposition is one of several contributing factors to gum disease. Bacteria ; poor oral hygiene are the major causes. Go to www. Perioprotect. Com to read about a proven non-surgical treatment system that significantly reduces bacteria in the gum pockets. ...Read more

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Can hormonal changes affect my risk of gingivitis?

Yes: Hormonal changes during puberty, pregnancy, or from birth control pills (for example) can increase your susceptibility to gingivitis. However, if you maintain excellent oral hygiene practices and get regular dental "cleanings, " your risk should be no higher than anyone else's. Gingivitis is still caused by plaque, regardless of how susceptible you might be to inflammation. ...Read more

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Toothpaste for preventing gingivitis? Do those toothpastes and mouthwashes that claim to fight tartar also help prevent gingivitis? Are they really better than regular toothpastes?

Prevent Gingivitis: They're not better just different they contain a chemical that keeps the calcium in your saliva from hardening in your plaque. If you brush well enough the plaque will not build up to be able to solidify into tartar. If you do have an excessive amount of buildup you should have your systemic ph checked. Your body ph can be too acidic leading calcium to be leached out of your bones. ...Read more

Dr. Gary Sandler
704 Doctors shared insights

Gum Disease (Definition)

Gun disease can range from gum swelling all the way to the bone keeping the teeth in place being lost, this can be be for a number of reasons, if you think you have gum disease please visit your ...Read more